Rorate Caeli

And in Africa...

The following is from a report which appears on the blog of Fr. Bernard Pellabeuf who has just taken a position as a professor of Latin for the seminary at Natitingou in the north of Benin.

At the minor seminary of Saint Pierre there are seventy-eight seminarians (who from their earliest years have) been introduced to Latin. The Mass in Latin is offered every Thursday. In all the seminaries of Benin, there is a Mass in Latin offered every week. I will ensure 19 hours of Latin per week.

Monsignor N'koué, the bishop of Natitingou, is very committed to the promotion of the liturgy in Latin. He has, for example, had the opportunity to celebrate Mass according to the Tridentine missal in Rome during one of the recent CIEL conventions. He invited the Sisters of the Benedictine Abbey of Joucques (diocese of Aix en Provence) who have their liturgy in Latin, to establish a community in his diocese. And he is particularly keen on ensuring that seminarians are learning Latin in accordance with canon law.

He created a personal parish for the faithful who wish to have Mass in the pre-counciliar Missal. The pastor, Father Denis Le Pivain, who built Saint Jean-Baptiste Church, consulted with Monsignor N'Koué about the orientation of the altar which he wanted to position so that Mass could be said on either side. The Bishop asked that the altar be constructed all the way against the wall.

In short, the Diocese of Natitingou is a laboratory where one can see the accuracy of Benedict XVI’s positions - especially in terms of liturgy.


Merci à Gatien, Le Forum Catholique

12 comments:

Anonymous said...

This Bishop is a REAL Catholic ,may his influence grow!!!!!

Mr. WAC said...

As the West spins off into Postmodernism, Africa may well be the depository of Western Civilization.

+mcitl said...

In this, as in so many other ways, "the last, or third world, will be first."

Jacob said...

Was it not the African bishops who opposed the vernacularization of the liturgy because of the expense of translating and printing missals for each little African dialect?

It does not surprise me at all that they should so naturally take to a single language to unite one and all of the Church.

Boko Fittleworth said...

This is great news. Most of the many African priests in America at whose Masses I've assisted have had been of a decided charismatic/folksy bent, liturgically. (Grown up) Africans are grown-ups, too. I think first- and second-world white formators have patronized them. A combination of this patronizing racism and the West's self-hating suicidal tendencies has withheld the full richness of the liturgy from these peoples. No longer, I pray.

Michael said...

I agree with all of the preceding comments and I say God speed to the New Liturgical Movement in Africa! Deo gratias!

Anonymous said...

boko fittleworth puts it very well. The African common sense in religion has been, often, corrupted by some African priests that came back to Africa, after graduating in theology in very unorthodox European and American institutions.
Bp N'koué is indeed a remarkable man of God and was present during the CIEL Roman colloquium in 2006. He is celebrating usually with the Ordinary Form but has no hatred for those who prefer the Extraordinary Form. He said he cannot understand why there is this trad-hatred in Europe.

However there are several points to keep in mind :
1. Bp N'koué is leading a small diocese with an overwhelming Muslim population
2. You won't find many Bp N'koué in Africa and love of Tradition is FAR from being shared by the present African episcopate, many of them having been deeply influenced by neo-modernist theologies. The 1994 Synod for Africa was very poor for example, extremely 1970's about silly inculturation.
3. Africa is partly forgotten by the Trad movement and this is a big mistake. Priestly vocations are HIGH in Africa : late Michael Davies was striving to foster links between ICR/FSSP and Africa during his last years and he was very wise.
4. Trad. institutes should make more efforts to settle in Africa : FSSP is doing well in Nattitingou and this example should be followed. The Good Shepherd tried to settle in Latin America with scarce results but it has done nothing so far to set a foot in Africa.
The future of the Church is partly in the Black Continent : stats are here to prove it.

Anonymous said...

This is a fascinating post. When Summorum Pontificum was promulgated many liberal critics said, loud and clear, that it would only apply and be taken up by a minority in the West and would have no bearing upon India, Africa and the Third World. This presents a different story and it will be interesting to see what fruit it bears. I wish Western seminaries would take note.

Angelo said...

Catholic Apostolate in Southern Africa:

To learn more of the Catholic Apostolate carried out by the Soceity of St Pius X, please visit their website at: http://www.sspxafrica.com/

There you will see the fruits of their missionary zeal and corporal works of mercy, particularly in Zimbabwe. Please pray for these priests & the Catholic faithful whose lives are at risk from anti-christian forces.

crusader88 said...

78 seminarians who have known Latin from their earliest years- excellent!

Benedicta said...

May the influence of this Bishop grow also on Fr. Le Pivain who desired that Holy Mass be said on either side!

Son of Trypho said...

It can only have positive effects having a grounding in classical languages - it allows these folks to access the Latin Fathers and Roman literature. good for them.