Rorate Caeli
The Australian lay sex abuse scandal

In an ongoing partnership with the traditional newspaper The Remnant comes a timely yet unfortunate account of a lay sex abuse scandal in Australia.

The author, R.J. Stove of Melbourne, was kind enough provide this linked PDF for Rorate Caeli readers, free of charge.


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4 comments:

R. J. Stove said...

Thank you very much, Mr. Paulitz, for giving this piece extra publicity.

Anonymous said...

Dear Australian Traditional Catholics,

I would be interested to know what life is like in Australia for Traditional Catholics (and large homeschooling Catholic families). I may be moving to Perth and am wondering what to expect. I know that there is a Tridentine parish in Perth and I think it is relatively welcome within the diocese (there is also an SSPX apostolate).

I realize that the majority of the world is going to he_ _; but how is Perth and/or Australia compared to Canada or the US (politics, life-issues, traditional family life, bishops, etc. etc.)

Sorry if this is not right on topic for this post (but there does not seem to be too much news from Australia on Rorate Caeli)

Any assistance would be great.

A Canadian

Joe B said...

Canadian,

I strongly suggest you get ready to homeschool by correspondence if you don't already, as my travels in Australia painted a clear picture of a disastrous public education system, even compared to ours.

Keith said...

To Anonymous: I've not been to Perth myself (I live in Melbourne). But I know that the diocesan Tridentine church there is of long standing, as, indeed, is the SSPX church in that city.

Generally speaking, one has reasonable access to diocesan Latin Masses within the mainland capital cities (Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth, Canberra, and in particular Adelaide) but elsewhere the situation is predominantly hopeless.

Outside those cities, it's pretty much either the SSPX or no Latin Mass at all. The 2007 Motu Proprio has had negligible Australian results, and to my knowledge has led to only two extra diocesan Latin Masses in the entire country: in Wollongong (New South Wales) and in Cranbourne (Victoria).

And Australian traditionalism is, by American - let alone French - standards, a very feeble plant indeed. This feebleness is partly a matter of numbers. First of all, Australia's whole population is only about 22 million. Secondly there is the antipodean temperament, the default mode of which is pagan. Father Edward Black, the SSPX's Scottish-born District Superior for Australia, remarked on the horror he felt when, shortly after arriving in Sydney, he saw a bumper sticker which read: "Everybody needs to believe in something. I believe I'll have another beer."

The SSPX's national seminary in Goulburn, New South Wales, has had to make drastic cuts to its courses recently because there simply are not enough seminarians enrolling. There is an FSSP presence in Sydney, thanks be to God, but it appears to be there only on sufferance.

Deep down, most of us Australians (and it really doesn't matter whether we call ourselves right-wing or left-wing, Catholic or Protestant or atheist) believe in the immaculate conception of Big Government. Accordingly, nothing would surprise me much about the predominant awfulness of Australian public schooling. It was dire when I went to a public school in the 1970s (I came from an atheist background) and I am sure it is far worse now.