Rorate Caeli

Traditional Latin Mass in Moscow, Russia

Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, Moscow

From Una Voce Russia, and edited for posting on Rorate:

The next 'approved' Traditional Latin Mass will be on May 31 (Pentecost), but usually it is offered every 1st Sunday of the month, at 1700 H (5:00 P.M.) in the basement chapel of the Cathedral (of the Immaculate Conception, Moscow).

The priest who offers the Mass is Fr. Augustyn Dziedziel SDB (pronounced Dzendzel and written in Polish with a special mark under the first e, ę in HTML). Catholic guests of Moscow are most welcome. (Father also speaks some English in addition to Polish and Russian, so confessions are possible before Mass.)

8 comments:

  1. Anonymous12:27 PM

    Does the priest have to actually understand the confession in order to absolve the penitent?

    Anonymous100

    ReplyDelete
  2. Anonymous5:01 PM

    Using English letters, Dziędziel is pronounced more like "Jenjel".

    ReplyDelete
  3. Wow, Traditional Latin Mass in my native Russia, how great is that? I never thought it would happen. The previous Archbishop of Moscow was a big enemy of Tradition. I guess times are changing!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Anonymous2:03 AM

    I am a convert from Russian Orthodoxy to Catholicism and i can only say GLORY TO GOD FOR ALL THINGS! The Russian people are a tradition loving people, the Tridentine mass would be far more accepted than the new I believe! Most Holy Mother of God save us!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Anonymous9:59 AM

    I hate to throw a wet blanket over the proceedings but why why why can't it be an every-Sunday Mass? Mass is the centre of the week. Having to go back and forth from one Rite to the other is like having spiritual schizophrenia. In my Mass listings, I count up dioceses having every-Sunday Traditional Latin Masses, even if at rotating locations. If a diocese doesn't have one every-Sunday, I just ignore it. Every-Sunday should be considered to be the absolute minimum; daily Mass the ideal. I am sick and tired of these bishops and priests who offer the mass once or twice or thrice a month. Frankly, if we had that in my Diocese, I'd refuse to go, and just go to the Ukrainian Byzantine Liturgy every Sunday.

    P.K.T.P.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Anonymous4:01 PM

    PKTP,
    Rather than disparaging the darkness, why not express joy in the light that is shining? Many, if not most places start with a periodic or even sporadic, then a single Sunday TLM. It often must grow organically with support of congregations and with the nurturing of a good and faithful priest and usually the support of the local hierarchy. Refusing to participate, because of limitations, is a disservice to what hope there may be. Spera in Deo.

    May God give blessings to all those who have the opportunity for this Mass in Russia and prayers for all those who are deprived of our sacred liturgical heritage.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Anonymous4:55 PM

    "Many, if not most places start with a periodic or even sporadic, then a single Sunday TLM"

    Actually, no, the great majority start with an every-Sunday T.L.M. and then some grow from there, to two or three of these per diocese or to daily. Most priests realise that at least one every Sunday is a spiritual starting-point given the obligation. I know a good deal about the numbers and actually keep track of them for one listing site. The one per month thingy is not a standard beginning, although it is certainly fairly common--unfortunately.

    P.K.T.P.

    ReplyDelete

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