Rorate Caeli

Caravaggio 1610-2010
The Taking of Christ


In this month of the 400th anniversary of the death of Caravaggio (Michelangelo Merisi), watch this beautiful documentary on his life, on Milan and Rome in the late 16th and early 17th centuries, and on one of his masterpieces, The Taking of Christ - in five parts.

The Taking of Christ belongs to the Society of Jesus in Ireland, in whose Dublin house it was rediscovered in the early 1990s, and is currently housed in the National Gallery of Ireland.

[Update: Father Finigan has thankfully placed the entire documentary in a continuous playlist: Click here, or watch in in five separate parts below.]

Part 1/5:



Part 2/5:




Part 3/5:




Part 4/5:




Part 5/5:


3 comments:

  1. Thanks for posting this. I remember making a trip up to Boston College to see this painting in 1999. I read a story about it in, of all places, America Magazine. The same issue also contained a previously unpublished Gerard Manley Hopkins poem. Probably the only worthwhile issue of that rag in 40 years.

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  2. Caravaggio is the ultimate realist IMHO and I enjoy his paintings of biblical themes very much. Too bad his personal life took such a horrendous turn.

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  3. M. A.4:06 AM

    Thank you for posting this. It was thoroughly enjoyable.

    I offer a prayer for the soul of this master, Carravagio.

    ReplyDelete

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