Rorate Caeli

Zielinski in Rome


Congratulations to Father Zielinski, O.S.B. Oliv., Abbot of Our Lady of Guadalupe, in Pecos, New Mexico, and a great friend of Tradition (see previous post) for his designation as Vice-President of both the Pontifical Commission for Sacred Archeology and the Pontifical Commission for the Cultural Heritage of the Church (in the picture, Zielinski in the 2007 Si Si No No Conference, in Paris).

19 comments:

  1. This is an excellent sign. To appoint a Traditionalist churchman who is also a friend of the SSPX is certainly a step forward.

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  2. Indeed. And in the light of the current President's recent appointment to another position, one wonders whether the Abbot will succeed him after a transitional period.

    I imagine that this appointment will require him to reside in Rome and therefore resign the Abbacy at Pecos?

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  3. Does his Abbey use the 1962 Missal?

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  4. Anonymous2:51 PM

    The "Si Si No No" Conference, hee hee.

    I wonder if one can make retreats at his monastery.

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  5. Anonymous3:09 PM

    Perhaps I am mistaken and this can be glorified. When I checked out the Abbey on the web, it looked a bit new agey to me. Is TLM even said at this Abbey?

    Miguel

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  6. Anonymous3:09 PM

    I live in New Mexico and have been trying to find out more about Abbot Zielinski ever since his first interview came out. We wanted to invite him to offer the indult TLM in Albuquerque, but so far we haven't succeeded in contacting him in person. To my knowledge the Abbey in Pecos uses the 1970 Missal. Still, it is wonderful to see supporters of tradition popping up all over the place, where you would least expect it.

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  7. New Mexico anonymous: Have you ever been to the traditional benedictines in Silver City, NM? They seem to be thriving.

    In any case, I'm glad to see this Abbot receive a Papal Appointment.

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  8. Anonymous5:18 PM

    Amigos lo han ascendido a vicepresidente de una pequeña comisión cargo creado para el.Para quitarle del puesto de abad de una floreciente abadia y tenerlo controlado en Roma.

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  9. Anonymous7:33 PM

    I could be mistaken, but I thought this particular abbey in New Mexico was way-liberal. A bit on the new-agey side, even.

    In fact, isn't this the abbey that practices the unheard of -- women (who called themselves Nuns) eating, working and praying with the monks. The Vatican recently told them as such -- not acceptable, especially considering that the women are not nuns, although dress like one.

    It just seems incredibly curious that this could be the same abbey that is being referenced here?

    Thanks for any enlightenment anyone can give me.

    God bless,

    Elizabeth

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  10. Anonymous7:34 PM

    I could be mistaken, but I thought this particular abbey in New Mexico was way-liberal. A bit on the new-agey side, even.

    In fact, isn't this the abbey that practices the unheard of -- women (who called themselves Nuns) eating, working and praying with the monks. The Vatican recently told them as such -- not acceptable, especially considering that the women are not nuns, although dress like nuns.

    It just seems incredibly curious that this could be the same abbey that is being referenced here?

    Thanks for any enlightenment anyone can give me.

    God bless,

    Elizabeth

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  11. Anonymous7:39 PM

    As far as I know, Pecos had been for a long time rather out there. Abbot Zielinsky himself has himself (I believe) only fairly recently discovered tradition more deeply.

    So it should be no surprise if the monastery still looks a little bit wacky - he has after all only been abbot there for three years.

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  12. Anonymous7:49 PM

    Abbot Zielinski was sent to Pecos by his Superiors in Rome several years ago to clean it up. It's been a long slow process -- it's also been a very difficult and challenging assignment for him.

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  13. Anonymous8:00 PM

    Another encouraging sign. Today I spoke to my bishop. He knows that I am desperate for the Motu Proprio, want to celebrate the traditional Mass and had expressed disappointment over Sacramentum Caritatis. He told me today that my disappointment over the lack of the Motu Proprio may have been premature. Although he wouldn`t say more I got the distinct impression that the Motu Proprio has arrived on his desk.

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  14. Anonymous9:53 PM

    Father Anonymous,

    You're not friend's with your bishop's cleaning lady by any chance?

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  15. Fr. Anonymous,

    If you bishop is sympathetic to your plight, I wonder why he doesn't give you a 'wide and generous' use of the 1988 Indult.
    It is certainly within his power. Then you wouldn't have to wait on the Motu.

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  16. Anonymous10:56 PM

    I know an example of a bishop (not my own) who is personally very sympathetic to the TLM and actually would like to issue an indult, but who hasn't done so because of adamant opposition by all his senior pastors.

    Bishops are often subject to pressures the rest of us don't often think of. As are popes. I recall a story of Pope Pius XII who had some problem with (as I recall it) the archpriest of St. Peter's, regarding some practice in the Basilica. Pius XII was asked, If this has been bothering you so long, why don't you just settle the matter with a snap of you finger. He replied, Well I'm only the Pope, you know. We have very little real power.

    Imagine how much less "real power" Benedict has! He too has to scheme and contrive to make it happen. For instance, to lay the foundation for a motu proprio so it actually has a tangible effect after it's promulgated.

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  17. Anonymous1:45 AM

    I've been to mass at the Benedictine Monastery in Pecos; a mixed bag, to be sure.

    No kneelers but also no guitars!

    I saw a group of Monks from there at the screening for "Into Great Silence".

    There is only one place in New Mexico that allows the Tridentine mass: at a small parish in one of the poorest parts of Albuquerque.

    I personally wrote to the Archbishop to allow a Latin mass in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and the Archbishop replied that the local "Dean" (Msgr. Jerome Martinez 'y Alire) was so against it, that, he too, would not allow it!

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  18. Anonymous10:14 AM

    Franz Josef, I should have added that my bishop although a good man is not sympathetic to the TLM.

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  19. Fr. Anon: Yes, I know another bishop like that. He's teaches the orthodox faith, has nothing but reverent liturgies in the Cathedral, is quick to stop the more outlandish abuses, and still he only allows the TLM once a month in the afternoon in as obscure village a good distance from his See city. I just don't understand it.

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