Rorate Caeli

It often pays to speak up


Congratulations to the opposition in the Slovak parliament and to the authorities of the Slovak Central Bank who, after much pressure from a populace (and a Catholic hierarchy) that was under Soviet Communism just a few short years ago, decided to press on with the special 2-euro coin for the 1150th anniversary of the arrival of the holy apostles of the Slavs, Saints Cyril and Methodius, in Great Moravia, and the beginning of the translation of the Bible in the local language.


26 Nov 2012

The €2 coins which will commemorate the 1,150th anniversary of Saints Cyril and Methodius in Great Moravia, set to be released in 2013, will contain the religious symbols that were originally proposed, the TASR newswire reported on November 23.

“The NBS [National Bank of Slovakia, country’s central bank – ed. note] Bank Council approved the original proposal of the design, even though it realises that the new approval process may lead to frustrating the original goal of releasing the commemorative coin throughout the 17-nation eurozone,” said spokesperson for the bank Petra Pauerová, as quoted by TASR.

The European Commission earlier stated that the commemorative coin cannot contain crosses and halos in order to observe the principle of religious neutrality in the European Union. Later it was revealed that it was not the EC as such, but certain eurozone members that objected to releasing the coin with religious symbols.

12 comments:

  1. Fidus et Audax12:35 AM

    It's a nice coin, such as it is until the Euro implodes as a currency.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Pater, O.S.B.9:16 AM

    According to another article, the two countries that objected to the religious symbols were France and Greece (!):

    http://spectator.sme.sk/articles/view/48319/10/european_commission_denies_responsibility_in_euro_coin_design_spat.html

    ReplyDelete
  3. Michael9:48 AM

    Excellent!

    "which countries?..."

    There is actually a link in the Spectator article you refer to where it says that the objecting countries were France (no surprise) and - of all countries - Greece.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I have a 2011 £2 coin that commemorates the 400th anniversary of the King James Bible, bearing the inscription "In the beginning was the Word." Prof. Dawkins notwithstanding, there is hope for Britain yet. Thank God we never joined the Euro.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Cruce Signatus3:58 PM

    So, the Catholic bishops in Slovakia opposed the minting of this coin? Why? It violated the new conciliar teaching of "religious liberty?"

    ReplyDelete
  6. The so-called “the principle of religious neutrality in the European Union” denies history. Europe is the Faith. You cannot argue against a fact (Aquinas).

    When will people realise what the true purpose of “Europe” is ?

    ReplyDelete
  7. Thanks be to God, they probably converted my Bulgarian ancestors...then they fell into schism :-(

    ReplyDelete
  8. Gratias6:15 AM

    Only a few years go the coat of arms of my city of Los Angeles had a cross. Catholic Enemies demanded it be removed. There was not a peep. So now no Cross.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I'd like to know how I can purchase these coins in America. Not only do I want one, but would like some to pass out to help people remember our faith is ancient and not one of the upstarts from the Reformation.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I'd like to know where and how I can purchase these coins in America. Not only do I want a couple for myself, but I would like to purchase some to pass out to Reformation.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Cruce Signatus, you need to re-read the article. The bishops and the people favor the coin.

    ReplyDelete
  12. @Father St. Clair,
    Try e-bay. I just ordered 5 (sans halos as originally designed).

    ReplyDelete

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