Rorate Caeli

The Redemption of History

The resurrection of Christ is not the fruit of speculation or mystical experience: it is an event which, while it surpasses history, nevertheless happens at a precise moment in history and leaves an indelible mark upon it. The light which dazzled the guards keeping watch over Jesus’ tomb has traversed time and space. It is a different kind of light, a divine light, that has rent asunder the darkness of death and has brought to the world the splendour of God, the splendour of Truth and Goodness. 
Just as the sun’s rays in springtime cause the buds on the branches of the trees to sprout and open up, so the radiance that streams forth from Christ’s resurrection gives strength and meaning to every human hope, to every expectation, wish and plan. Hence the entire cosmos is rejoicing today, caught up in the springtime of humanity, which gives voice to creation’s silent hymn of praise. The Easter Alleluia, resounding in the Church as she makes her pilgrim way through the world, expresses the silent exultation of the universe and above all the longing of every human soul that is sincerely open to God, giving thanks to him for his infinite goodness, beauty and truth. 
"In your resurrection, O Christ, let heaven and earth rejoice." To this summons to praise, which arises today from the heart of the Church, the "heavens" respond fully: the hosts of angels, saints and blessed souls join with one voice in our exultant song. In heaven all is peace and gladness. But alas, it is not so on earth! Here, in this world of ours, the Easter alleluia still contrasts with the cries and laments that arise from so many painful situations: deprivation, hunger, disease, war, violence. Yet it was for this that Christ died and rose again! He died on account of sin, including ours today, he rose for the redemption of history, including our own.
Benedict XVI
Easter Sunday, 2011

12 comments:

  1. Anonymous1:01 AM

    I wish the Blessing at Easter would incorporate the use of the Tiara and Flabellum in the backround on the balcony. Instead of being in a museum having them used on the balcony for Easter and maybe Christmas would be a good way to remain in continuity with the past. Not used in Processions and the such but I think the world could stand twice a year. The Flabelli always made for a beautiful backdrop. Think iPhone wallpaper ! A modern way to utilize symbols of our Catholic past. Happy Easter..

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  2. "All men, from the beginning of the world until its end, have been redeemed by Christ and his cross." John Paul II on his universal salvation hypothesis. One can detect in the notion "The redemption of history" here a palimpsest of the same liberal modernist signification. Bearing in mind the devotion one had for the other one can only analyse the same intention.

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  3. One can detect in the notion "The redemption of history" here a palimpsest of the same liberal modernist signification.

    I think it's a real stretch to get from Christ's redemption of human history to any form of apocatastasis.

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  4. Understand the language and comprehend the interrelationship then no stretch is involved. With liberal modernist philosophies the connexion is a very real one.

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  5. There is absolutely no stretch of the intellect to connect the two. They are intimately interrelated.

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  6. Anonymous10:00 PM

    Jordanes:

    You confuse me here. All men are redeemed by Christ, but not all men are saved because some men reject Him. But in theory everyone could have accepted Him, or else we would have to say that some men were born damned, which is Calvinist, not Catholic.

    Genuine free will means that everybody could choose or could have chosen Christ. That doesn't mean we have to think that likely.

    Tom

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  7. Anonymous11:40 PM

    Jordanes:

    I meant of course to address LeoG. Sorry.

    And to avoid being accused of some form of Pelagianism: I should have said "some men born unable to avoid damnation, which is Calvinist".

    Tom

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  8. Thanks for the clarification, Tom. You had me scratching my head there.

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  9. Then let us talk plainly about the redemption of man since the other contains seeds of ambiguity and closely allies with empty speculation in universal salvation. The liberal mental leap is not a very difficult one to make.

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  10. The History of Redemption certainly.

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  11. Picard11:39 PM

    "... it surpasses history ... has traversed time and space..."


    -> !!!!???!!!!!

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  12. @Picard: Yes since it is divine it cannot be limited to the constraints of time and space. And your point is?

    Scrooge

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