Rorate Caeli
"In matters political Islam is a system of despotism at home and aggression abroad. The Prophet commanded absolute submission to the imâm. In no case was the sword to be raised against him. The rights of non-Moslem subjects are of the vaguest and most limited kind, and a religious war is a sacred duty whenever there is a chance of success against the 'Infidel'.



"Medieval and modern Mohammedan, especially Turkish, persecutions of both Jews and Christians are perhaps the best illustration of this fanatical religious and political spirit."
Gabriel Oussani, The Catholic Encyclopedia (1910)

More information and pictures of the Turkish persecution of the Christian Greek-speaking population in the 1890-1955 period in Asia Minor and East Thrace here.

On the Armenian Genocide, visit the websites of the Armenian National Institute and of Never Again.

On the Assyrian Genocide.

10 comments:

The Book Burner said...

shudder...

humboldt said...

I don't see the point to be dwelling on the horrible past of both Europe and Asia. In my opinion it was a terrible mistake for Benedict XVI to slap in the face the Islam religion during his speech at Regensburg. It is still more negative in view that he did this, under the patronage of the German politicians who lobbied him to engage in this way. I hope that Benedict XVI and the Roman Curia do not have the belief that Turkey 2006 is Central America in 1983. It will be a terrible mistake for them to believe this. And it will be a graver mistake to believe that the Pope has the power and the duty to intervene everywhere, specially when the methods used are not of Jesus Christ, but of the secular world, as it was evidenced in Regensburg. Let's pray for the humility of the Pope, because he needs it.

New Catholic said...

"It is still more negative in view that he did this, under the patronage of the German politicians who lobbied him to engage in this way."

I do not believe this is a fair depiction of what happened in Regensburg at all.

As for the past, it is not as if the facts mentioned here refer to the distant Crusades, but to the very formation of the modern Turkish state, in the late Ottoman and early Kemalist periods. One country, three genocides (and one ethnic cleansing in motion in Cyprus -- a fact which is terribly present-day).

humboldt said...

new catholic, just to remind you before His Holiness's trip to Germany, he was visited by Chancellor Angela Merkel to discuss the issue of Islam, then when he arrived in Germany the German president told him publicly to engage in the dialogue with Islam, and then before this trip to Turkey, again the German president visited him. The topic of discussion has always been Islam and Europe. As for the past, that is not the Christian way, the Christian way is to forgive and move on. Besides in every tragedy there are always two sides of the issue. The Church sheppeard popes, not international politicians. We need more St. Pius X, not more Alexander VIs or Julius IIs.

proklos said...

The whole episode of the Pope's speech ill-advised. Benedict XV's remarks seemed calculated to offend Muslims and to launch a Catholic offensive against the Muslim world. To me this is a mistake. There are a large number of Muslims who do not think that it is worth having a religious belief if you're not willing to die for it. I do not think the same thing can be said for Catholics. It certainly can't be said for the secularist majority in the West. A war with Islam will have to be a nuclear holocaust with devastating results for the planet or a slow war of attrition where the victor will probably be the Muslims. It will be a repeat of Vietnam. Look at poor Israel! They can't eradicate the Palestinians and they can't make peace with them either. They launched a huge attack against Lebanon and are still having to face Hizbullah.

humboldt said...

Unfortunately in view of the policy of the Holy See, regarding interreligious dialogue, since the II Vatican Council, and in view of the past life of the Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, it is very easy to believe indeed that Benedict XVI said those words in Regensburg with a deliberate intention, not that they were a minor part of a discurse on another topic. All if all the speech appeared to be the making of a lout and not the speech of a Pope. The effects of the speech are imposible to calculate, but they will be negative for everybody.

MacK said...

This is a political visit and no more. Ecumenism is being placed on a very political footing along with it. I cannot imagine anyone really believes that once muslims are in a majority in some European countries which is the distinct demographic reality in the future, they will not implement their own political programmes. These have very little, if anything, in common with Christian norms and values. Moreover, islam is a militant faith with global evangelising ambitions. This maybe ignored for the moment but this reality will be felt when the time comes.

Tito said...

GOod posting. More of this needs to be told to the post-Christian West.

Felipe A. said...

Very nice post. No one should forget these massacres (nor any other). And we must pay attention to the fact that the Turkish goverment deny these events (We can't say the same of the germans or of the Catholic Church indeed).

Jacob said...

You forgot the Kurds, the Turks' own co-religionists.