Rorate Caeli

Towards a Global War? Ducunt fata volentem, nolentem trahunt - by Roberto de Mattei

Corrispondenza Romana
April 17, 2024


As missiles and drones ply the skies from the Black Sea to the Mediterranean, the concern of Western diplomacies seems to be to procrastinate as much as possible a general conflagration that everyone believes is inevitable. One reason for this pessimism is the apparent lack of a way forward in the face of increasingly intractable international issues, such as those in Ukraine and the Middle East. Only an axiological view of politics could offer a glimmer of light, but today every state, every coalition, makes Carl Schmitt's categories its own, according to which it is up to those who guide the destinies of peoples to decide from time to time who is the friend and who is the enemy. To the traditional social order, based on the Augustinian "tranquility in order"(De Civitate Dei, lib. 19, c. 12, 1), Schmitt opposes, as the norm of politics, the principle of disorder, based on Hobbes' theory of homo homini lupus . However, in the age of international disorder, nothing can be predicted and calculated with certainty, and politics turns into a game of chance, whose only rule is the imponderable. Probably neither Russia had calculated well the risk of the invasion of Ukraine, nor Hamas the consequences of the October 7 attack. The process of subsequent events is fraught with uncertainty and randomness.

ABORTION AND POLITICS - by Archbishop Héctor Agüer

      April 17, 2024


The question of abortion continues to be an important object of debate in many countries. The worldwide wave of approval of the "abominable crime", as the Second Vatican Council called it, is driven by feminist movements, progressive sectors, and the left in the nations; and "Catholic" groups, which submit to the neo-pagan conception of life, supported by alleged anti-human "rights", and contrary to the Law of God.

Gregorius Magnus: new edition published

Gregorius Magnus is the twice-yearly magazine of Una Voce International (FIUV), which groups together 41 lay-led Una Voce and Latin Mass Society groups from every part of the world.

This edition has a photographic report on the Summorum Pontificum Ad Petri Sedem pilgrimage, articles from new contributors, and contributions from the the magazines of the FIUV's member associations.
  • Pope Benedict, one year on: Caroline Farey on 'The Way of Beauty'; Andrew Cusack on the liberation of the Old Mass.
  • 120 year anniversary of Evelyn Waugh
  • St Thomas Becket, by Thomas Colsey
  • T.S. Eliot, by Robert Lazu Kmita
  • Cardinal Ambongo on Fiducia supplicans, by Michael Haynes
  • A Traditional Catholic school in Nigeria

The Eucharist: What is said and done around this sacrament and during its celebration

A book review 
by Clemens Victor Oldendorf of Urban Hannon's Thomistic Mystagogy: St. Thomas Aquinas's Commentaries on the MassTranslated from German by Peter Kwasniewski.

Born in 1225, St. Thomas Aquinas died 750 years ago this past March 7. Those who observe the liturgical calendar that corresponds to the traditional Roman rite celebrate the feast of Aquinas on this date every year and therefore celebrated it just over a month ago.

On the occasion of such a remarkable historical commemoration, it is fitting to once again take a conscientious look at the life and teachings of the Doctor Communis, and this examination can be quite intense, because throughout the next year we will be commemorating the 800th anniversary of the birth of this authoritative theologian prince from the Dominican order. In 2024 and 2025, we will once again have a seamlessly merging double jubilee for St. Thomas Aquinas and all those who venerate him and draw on his philosophical and theological achievements.

Vatican II and the Re-emergence of the Traditional Latin Mass

 



It is often assumed that there is a deep and irreconcilable tension between allowing the continued celebration of the traditional Latin Mass and the Second Vatican Council. After all, the reform of the liturgy was itself set in motion by the Vatican II document Sacrosanctum Concilium.  Thus, Pope Francis stated in his apostolic letter Desiderio Desideravi,  “I do not see how it is possible to say that one recognizes the validity of the Council — though it amazes me that a Catholic might presume not to do so — and at the same time not accept the liturgical reform born out of Sacrosanctum Concilium, a document that expresses the reality of the Liturgy intimately joined to the vision of Church so admirably described in Lumen Gentium.” It was for this reason, Pope Francis explained, that he felt it “his duty” to issue his motu proprio Traditionis Custodes, restricting the celebration of the traditional Latin Mass.

Joseph Shaw on Traditionis Custodes and the Future of the TLM

 

Last Sunday, Dr. Joseph Shaw delivered a lecture for the Arlington Latin Mass Society titled Traditionis Custodes and the Future of the Traditional Latin Mass. In it, he provides an update on the status of Latin Mass restrictions and their future, and answers audience questions. We are delighted to share this lecture at the following link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PHay2Vl0I2A.

Divine dignity alone is strictly infinite - Edward Feser, for Rorate Cæli

Edward Feser

for Rorate Cæli


Saint Thomas Aquinas, by Juan de Peñalosa


The Declaration Dignitas Infinita begins with the assertion that “every human person possesses an infinite dignity, inalienably grounded in his or her very being,” and claims also that this “is fully recognizable even by reason alone.”  The second assertion is nearly as striking as the first, because the Declaration’s opening line is in fact radically counterintuitive.  On any natural reading of the phrase “infinite dignity,” human beings clearly do not have it.  Only God does.  

“Dignitas Infinita” as a Naturalistic Vision of Mankind — Article by Jeanne Smits

(source)

Following the presentation in Rome of the Declaration on Human Dignity, Dignitas infinita, the most frequent reactions, including in so-called conservative circles, are focused on its reminder of the prohibition of abortion, surrogate motherhood, euthanasia, assisted suicide, gender theory and sex reassignment, not to mention its plea for respect for the disabled. None of this is new, nor should it be. What needs to be analyzed, however, are the arguments deployed and the principles asserted. As might be expected, the Declaration Dignitas Infinita (“infinite dignity”) is, despite many traditional assertions, in line with a naturalistic vision of man. While it quotes extensively from Vatican II, Paul VI, John Paul II, Benedict XVI and—in abundance—Pope Francis, the magisterium of earlier popes is virtually absent.

The Declaration Dignitas infinita and the Mystery of the Church in our time - by Roberto de Mattei



by Roberto de Mattei
April 10, 2024


On April 8, 2024, the Dicastery for the Doctrine of the Faith, headed by Cardinal Víctor Manuel Fernández, published the Declaration Dignitas infinita on Human Dignity, with the "ex audientia" approval of Pope Francis. Cardinal Fernández, dwelling in the Introduction of the Declaration on its genesis, clarifies that the first draft of the text, which dates back to 2019, is due to his predecessor, Cardinal Luis Francisco Ladaria Ferrer.

Fontgombault Sermon for the Annunciation: "Who sows the Fiat reaps the Magnificat"

Feast of the Annunciation 


Jubilee of Profession of 
Dom François Convert 
and Br. Louis-Marie Pavageau 


Sermon of the Right Reverend Dom Jean Pateau 
Father Abbot of Our Lady of Fontgombault
Fontgombault, April 8, 2024

Qui seminant in lacrimis, in exsultatione metent. 
They that sow in tears shall reap in joy. 
(Ps 125:5) 

Dear Brothers and Sisters, 
My dearly beloved Sons, 
and most especially you, who are celebrating your jubilee of profession, 


Why do we head the homily of a Marian feast with this verse, a quotation taken from Psalm 125? We should recall that our two jubilarians are among the few who have had the privilege, according to some, the austere trial, according to others, to pronounce their vows of religion during Lent. They have therefore sown in tears. But God, Who orders all things in measure, and number, and weight, (Cf. Wis 11:2) grants them today to jubilate during Eastertide. 

Declaration “Dignitas Infinita”, on Human Dignity - Dicastery for the Doctrine of the Faith

Declaration “Dignitas Infinita”

on Human Dignity

Presentation


During the Congresso of 15 March 2019, the then-Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith decided to commence “the drafting of a text highlighting the indispensable nature of the dignity of the human person in Christian anthropology and illustrating the significance and beneficial implications of the concept in the social, political, and economic realms—while also taking into account the latest developments on the subject in academia and the ambivalent ways in which the concept is understood today.” An initial draft of the text was prepared with the help of some experts in 2019 but a Consulta Ristretta of the Congregation, convened on 8 October of the same year, found it to be unsatisfactory.


The Doctrinal Office then prepared another draft ex novo, based on the contribution of various experts, which was presented and discussed in a Consulta Ristretta held on 4 October 2021. In January 2022, the new draft was presented during the Plenary Session of the Congregation, during which the Members took steps to shorten and simplify the text.


Following this, on 6 February 2023, the amended version of the new draft was reviewed by a Consulta Ristretta, which proposed some additional modifications. An updated version was then submitted for the Members’ consideration during the Ordinary Session of the Dicastery (Feria IV) on 3 May 2023, where Members agreed that the document, with some adjustments, could be published. Subsequently, Pope Francis approved the deliberations of that session during the Audience granted to me on 13 November 2023. On this occasion, he also asked that the document highlight topics closely connected to the theme of dignity, such as poverty, the situation of migrants, violence against women, human trafficking, war, and other themes. To honor the Holy Father’s directions, the Doctrinal Section of the Dicastery dedicated a Congresso to an in-depth study of the Encyclical Fratelli Tutti, which offers an original analysis and further consideration of the theme of human dignity “beyond all circumstances.”

Francis: a Pontificate filled with Bad Omens - The Icon of Christ the Redeemer Falls Down During Vatican Easter Mass



The fallen Christ the Redeemer in front of Pope Francis, what does it mean? Omens and alleged mysterious signs.


A certainly unforeseen anomaly that has inevitably been juxtaposed with other signs that have occurred in recent years coinciding with major Vatican changes


by Franca Giansoldati
Il Messagero
Tuesday, April 2, 2024

[Main excerpt]


On Easter Day, during Mass at the Vatican, a gust of wind more powerful than the others caused the ancient icon of the Christ the Redeemer on the courtyard facing St. Peter's Basilica to fall ruinously to the ground. Two attendants immediately intervened to put back up the heavy support that had collapsed just a few meters from the Pope during the Easter ceremony. An anomalous and curious episode on which many have dwelt trying to identify messages, as if that fact could be a heavenly sign, capable of unveiling future events.