Rorate Caeli

Back to a regular Roman-style Papal Pallium


Finally, the fake archaeologist feature favored by Archbishop Piero Marini in the beginning of Pope Benedict's pontificate - the pseudo-ancient pallium - is to be retired. A new papal pallium (pictured above and very similar to the one used for most of the past centuries, up to Pope John Paul II) is to be used for the first time in the celebrations for Saints Peter and Paul.

This is the main point of the interview granted by the Master of Papal Liturgical Ceremonies, Monsignor Guido Marini, to L'Osservatore Romano (permanent link) which also includes some very interesting answers, especially on the mode of distribution of Holy Communion:
...
In the recent visit to Santa Maria di Leuca and Brindisi, the Pope has distributed communion to the kneeling faithful in the mouth. Is it a practice destined to become usual in papal celebrations?

I think so. Regarding it, it should not be forgotten that the distribution of communion in the hand still remains, from a juridical viewpoint, an indult from the universal law, granted by the Holy See to those Episcopal Conferences which have made a request for it. The mode adopted by Benedict XVI tends to underline the force of the norm valid for the entire Church. In addition, a preference could perhaps be seen for the use of this mode of distribution, which, without eliminating anything from the other, puts into light better the truth of the real presence in the Eucharist, aids the devotion of the faithful, introduces with greater ease the sense of mystery. Aspects which, in our age, pastorally speaking, it is urgent to underline and recover.

...

Still today the motu proprio Summorum Pontificum, on the use of the Roman Liturgy from before the reform effected in 1970, seems to give rise to contrasting interpretations. Celebrations presided by the Pope according to the extraordinary form, that is, the ancient one, are predictable?

It is a question which I do not know how to answer. Regarding the mentioned motu proprio, considering it with serene attention and without ideological views, together with the letter addressed by the Pope to the Bishops of the whole world to present it, a double precise understanding is brought forth. First of all, that of favoring the accomplishment of "a reconciliation in the interior of the Church"; and, in this sense, as it has been said, the motu proprio is a most beautiful act of love for the unity of the Church. In second place - and that is a datum not to be forgotten - its purpose is to favor a reciprocal enrichment between both forms of the Roman Rite: in such a way, for example, that in the celebrations according to the Missal of Paul VI (which is the ordinary form of the Roman Rite) "will be able to demonstrate more powerfully than has been the case hitherto, the sacrality which attracts many people to the former usage".

23 comments:

Anonymous said...

E' ufficiale: d'ora in poi Comunione in ginocchio per i fedeli che riceveranno l'Eucaristia dalle mani del Santo Padre

CITTA’ DEL VATICANO - L’abitudine del Papa di distribuire la comunione ai fedeli in ginocchio, cosi' come e' accaduto nella recente visita a Santa Maria di Leuca e a Brindisi, anche per recuperare il ''senso della devozione e del mistero''. Lo ha annunciato, in un'intervista all'Osservatore Romano, Monsignor Guido Marini, Maestro delle cerimonie liturgiche pontificie. Alla domanda se Benedetto XVI continuera' a distribuire l'ostia consacrata ponendola nella bocca dei fedeli inginocchiati, il cerimoniere ha risposto: ''penso proprio di sì''. ''Al riguardo - ha spiegato - non bisogna dimenticare che la distribuzione della comunione sulla mano rimane tuttora, dal punto di vista giuridico, un indulto alla legge universale, concesso dalla Santa Sede a quelle conferenze episcopali che ne abbiano fatto richiesta''. ''La modalita' adottata da Benedetto XVI tende a sottolineare la vigenza della norma valida per tutta la Chiesa. In aggiunta si potrebbe forse vedere anche una preferenza per l'uso di tale modalita' di distribuzione che, senza nulla togliere all'altra, meglio mette in luce - osserva Monsignor Marini - la verita' della presenza reale nell'Eucaristia, aiuta la devozione dei fedeli, introduce con piu' facilita' al senso del mistero. Aspetti che, nel nostro tempo, pastoralmente parlando, e' urgente sottolineare e recuperare''. Quanto alla possibilita' che Benedetto XVI celebri una Messa in latino secondo il messale di San Pio V, il cerimoniere al momento non si pronuncia: ''Si tratta - afferma - di una domanda a cui non so dare risposta''.

Fonte: Petrus

Anonymous said...

ntroibo ad Altare Dei - Inserito il primo sacerdote tradizionalista nella Diocesi di Verona

CITTA’ DEL VATICANO - La diocesi di Verona, una delle prime in Italia a celebrare la Messa secondo il rito romano antico, ora puo' vantare un sacerdote di formazione tradizionalista inserito a pieno titolo nel clero scaligero. Si tratta di don Vilmar Pavesi, brasiliano di origini lombarde, da un anno naturalizzato italiano. Ad annunciarlo e' Maurilio Cavedini, presidente di ''Una voce'', l'associazione che raccoglie i cattolici tradizionalisti. ''La sua nomina - sottolinea - e' una delle tante aperture di Papa Benedetto XVI: qualche anno fa non sarebbe stato possibile neppure pensarla''. Gia' da vari anni nella Chiesa di Santa Toscana ogni mattina alle 9:15 viene celebrata una messa - alla presenza di una cinquantina di persone - secondo i dettami del rito romano antico, che impone, oltre all'uso del latino, una ritualita' rigorosa per l'officiante, che volta le spalle ai fedeli e si muove seguendo regole precise. ''Purtroppo in altre parti del Veneto, come nel bellunese e nel vicentino - rileva Cavedini - non vi e' stata la stessa 'apertura' e la richiesta di poter avere un sacerdote tradizionalista non e' stata ancora accolta''.

Fonte: Petrus.org

Anonymous said...

This doesn't look like the old pallium. Pointed ends, different size, red crosses. It's a whole different animal.

New Catholic said...

True: it does, however, compared with the intervening Piero-Marini-Pallium.

Winston said...

anonymouse @ 21:33

My gosh, you are right! How could they go from black to red? And from a rounded bottom to a pointed on?

Will a clearly invalid pallium like this one nullify all acts of the Holy Father? I am quite concerned.

Sancte Custos Palliarum, ora

Jordanes said...

Celebrations presided by the Pope according to the extraordinary form, that is, the ancient one, are predictable?

It is a question which I do not know now to answer.


Hmm. That's . . . interesting . . . Should that be "how," or is he implying that something is in the works and he just can't talk about it yet?

Anonymous said...

Will a clearly invalid pallium like this one nullify all acts of the Holy Father? I am quite concerned.

just wondering how a piece of material could nullify all acts of the Holy Father? Is'nt it just a piece of material?

New Catholic said...

Sorry, it was a typo, Jordanes (now fixed). In a strictly literal translation, he said, "It is a question to which I do not know [how] to give an answer".

Anonymous said...

"This doesn't look like the old pallium. Pointed ends, different size, red crosses. It's a whole different animal."

Much better than the scarf that the Pope uses now which is hideous.

Symeon said...

It'd be great if the Pope took the opportunity (when changing "back" the design of the pallium) to also start putting the fanon back into usage...

I liked the "new" pallium because it made it possible to immediately tell that the mitre-wearer was the Pope, even from a distance.

I want to be able to tell wether a person 30 meters away is the Pope or a bishop, even without my glasses. Bring back exclusively papal liturgical clothes! The "new" papal cross is great, but the newer (2nd of BXVI) pallium isn't different enough from the ones of the archbishops, and without fanon, tiara or sedia it's hard to tell him from any other white-haired archbishop from a distance. The only really distinct thing he has now is the "new" papal cross.

Mitchell Bond said...

The fact that it is a direct and obvious development of the Roman pallium, rather than a shameless antiquarianism, is in perfect accordance with Benedict's need to shove the hard fact that continuity and not rupture must be a universal truth down both traditionalist and liberal throats. Anyone who says, 'he changed the pallium, he isn't adhering to those styles popular during the peak of civilisation (a.k.a. the 1950s and not really the peak of civilisation, but don't tell a hardline traditionalist that), he's a modernist heretick!' needs to be lined up against the wall and pelted with rotten vegetables and possibly shot. Utter stupidity.

This pallium seems more natural to me that something which is also just an antique pulled out of a crate in the attic, because its alive, neither artificial nor petrified. This is what Catholic traditionalists have lost sight of, the seek so solidly to preserve a single moment in ecclesial history as a static expression of orthdox faith, forgetting that the faith is alive. What we need to do is take tradition and let it grow, let us build upon our grand inheritance in liturgical ceremonial, art, architecture and music, without becoming too purist. When we start saying things like, 'well, I don't like it because he was true to the original design' then we have becoe curators in a realm of death and dust, rather than in the living tradition of the church, and, no, I don't mean living like the modernists do, I mean living as in Christ is life, nothing of his can be dead. Let's stop trying to press the flower between the pages of dusty volume and let it grow.

This pallium hopefully is a start in that direction

Anonymous said...

"Will a clearly invalid pallium like this one nullify all acts of the Holy Father? I am quite concerned.

just wondering how a piece of material could nullify all acts of the Holy Father? Is'nt it just a piece of material?"

Wow, the internet truly is poor medium for irony . . .

~Tobias

Anonymous said...

Some things really needn't change. The tonsure, for example, has been a crown of various thicknesses for centuries. I would hate to see someone modify it just to show that our faith is "alive." The vibrancy of tradition isn't determined by how quickly it changes by its use and acceptance. The pallium, the rosary, the stations of the cross, none of these things need to be recast for the faith to live.

Father G said...

"Finally, the fake archaeologist feature favored by Archbishop Piero Marini in the beginning of Pope Benedict's pontificate - the pseudo-ancient pallium - is to be retired."

Good!!!

Jordanes said...

Sorry, it was a typo, Jordanes (now fixed). In a strictly literal translation, he said, "It is a question to which I do not know [how] to give an answer".

Oh, I was afraid of that. Serves me right for getting my hopes up.

Giangaleazzo said...

"Old" vestments? That is a small matter... How about some "old" theology and real Catholic spirit from before the 60s revolution?

Anonymous said...

"This doesn't look like the old pallium. Pointed ends, different size, red crosses. It's a whole different animal."


This is ridiculous. To quibble about the colors of the crosses, or pointed ends on a pallium which is a return to a much more traditional style is a waste of time.
Rather, be happy that this form of the pallium IS a return to more traditional Papal vesture (even JP II had an odd pallium which was a throwback to early Medieval times for awhile). The new Papal pallium will give the opportunity for Benedict XVI to possible (hopefully) wear Roman fiddleback Papal vestments (which were impossible with the previous pallium), and also to restore the Papal fanon (which was also impossible to wear with Pope Benedict's original pallium....which granted was a return to 3rd-9th century Papal palliums, was adopted as an excuse by the infamous former Papal Maestro of Ceremonies, Piero Marini so that precicely Pope Benedict XVI would not be able to wear confortably either the Roman fiddleback vestments, nor the fanon....both of which Benedict XVI loves...but which Piero Marini despised!

Cerimoniere said...

Perhaps we could concentrate with a little greater joy on the fact that the Vicar of Christ will now be seen administering Holy Communion exclusively on the tongue to kneeling communicants? And that Mgr. Marini has reminded the world that Communion in the hand remains legal only by indult?

attende said...

I agree entirely with comments of Symeon and Mitchel Bond that the new pallium is a welcome return to the traditional western style of pallium whilst preserving some of the best elements of elements of the current Archbishop Bugnni style pallium, viz red, rather than black, crosses for the wounds of our Lord.

I also agree we need to develop more distinctively papal vesture, which was bid argument in favour of the Byzantine style pallium – at least among Western bishops you could spot he Pope at 50 yeards! At a minimum we need to restore the fanon but we need to go further. The obvious solution would be to restore the predecessor of the papal tiara, the camelaucum or to adopt the early medieval version of the tiara which was basically closed mire. Such a closed mire would be distinctively ecclesiastical and would have none of the resonance of secular kingship which, sadly, seems to so offend the modern sensibility. Another possibility would be for the traditional tiara to be placed on the altar when the pope celebrates but not to have him actually wear it. Among the surviving monarchies of Europe only t British monarch actually wears a crown at the coronation at the annual state opening of parliament. The others mere have the crown present at their installation ceremony.

Anonymous said...

"The obvious solution would be to restore the predecessor of the papal tiara, the camelaucum or to adopt the early medieval version of the tiara which was basically closed mire."

Attende,

Benedict has already made clear that he doesn't believe in archaeologist vestments. If he's not going to wear an ninth century pallium, why would he wear ninth century head gear? It's true that with an antique mitre you could spot the Holy Father from a hundred yards away, but nothing would be as effective as the sedia.

Anonymous said...

"This is ridiculous. To quibble about the colors of the crosses, or pointed ends on a pallium which is a return to a much more traditional style is a waste of time.
Rather, be happy that this form of the pallium IS a return to more traditional Papal vesture (even JP II had an odd pallium which was a throwback to early Medieval times for awhile)."

JPII continued to wear the traditional pallium until he died. This might resemble a traditional pallium but it isn't one. Rather, it's a synthesis of the traditional form and Marini's pallium. Benedict has done the same with his coat of arms. Someone gets rid of the tiara and adds a pallium, Benedict restores the tiara but keeps the pallium. This pope is not content with simply restoring traditions. He puts his stamp on them first and then brings them back. He does seem to believe that everything must change in response to Vatican II, but diasgress with past pontiffs and reformers on how far things should change.

Anonymous said...

I have to say that I liked the pallium that Benedict XVI has been using. It is good to have something that differs the office of the papacy from an archbishop and it also showed Benedict's love of the classical vestments. I was hoping it would be a mainstay of the papacy because it is a throwback pallium that shows how the pallium has changed over the thousands of years. The picture of his new pallium just doesn't look "right" to me. I'm sure by the time that I come to accept it, the Don will change it again.

Anonymous said...

"JPII continued to wear the traditional pallium until he died."

That's not true, actually. Toward the end, John Paul II began to sport a new pallium, same in form as the 'traditional' version, but much larger. The fabric was also much coarser. It wasn't at all attractive, to be honest, and I'm glad it didn't survive him.

I've seem images of Benedict XVI in which he has (very unhappily) paired his over-the-shoulder style pallium with a Roman-style chasuble. The combination looks horrendous; they do not play well together at all.

That having been said, I do like Benedict's first pallium a great deal. But I also love the fact that he's reintroduced the Renaissance and Baroque-era designs with respect to vestments. When wearing them, he, of course, should wear his latest pallium.

But since he's ditched the pallium he was invested with anyway, why the need to wear only one pallium all the time. This newest pallium has no significance to his pontificate. Why not wear them interchangeably? Wear the larger one when wearing ample vestments and the smaller one when wearing Roman vestments.

And bring back the fanon. A pope wearing a Roman chasuble without a fanon just looks incomplete.

James
Buffalo, New York