Rorate Caeli

Abuse rewarded

One of the dozens of shocking stories of neglect and institutional failure in Ireland included in the Report of The Commission to Inquire into Child Abuse, published today:

Br Dacian [fictional name of a member of the Christian Brothers] was the subject of a complaint of sexual abuse in the early 1960s in Salthill. He was transferred from Galway to a day school in Dublin and was later sent to serve in Letterfrack [Industrial School] in the 1970s.

In a letter to the Superior General, the Provincial in Salthill elaborated on the allegation. A child awoke to find someone with his hand inside his pyjamas. Although it was dark the boy identified the person as Br Dacian by his voice and size. Br Dacian admitted doing this, but offered the defence that he was checking to see if the child, who was a known bed-wetter, had wet his bed. The Provincial continued, ‘It is apparent that this does not explain everything’. A letter sent three days later to the Superior of the School noted that he was sorry for the lapse of Br Dacian and that all the members of the Council thought that a change was necessary for him, as ‘no doubt some of the boys know of this lapse’.

Br Dacian was moved to a school in Dublin less than five months later. He stayed there for nearly 10 years before being moved to Letterfrack.

He spent a year in Letterfrack before moving to another day school in Dublin where he taught for over 10 years. Br Dacian admitted sexually assaulting a boy in this day school and he had to be transferred out of it in the early 1980s. Although it did not emerge until some five years later, another allegation that abuse had occurred at the same time was made by a pupil in an Irish College where Br Dacian was working during that summer.

...

Br Dacian was appointed Principal of a rural school in 1984 less than a year after his removal from the Dublin school but, once again, he had to be removed from his position because of his sexual abuse of a young boy in 1987.

The Commission to Inquire into Child Abuse
in the Republic of Ireland

37 comments:

Anonymous said...

I highly recommend the book "The Rite of Sodomy" by Randy Engel if you have not already read it. It's worth the price and heavily footnoted so you can verify her sources.

Delphina

Anonymous said...

Here it comes. The Archbishop of Dublin warned us that the report coming from the Republic of Ireland this "summer" would be especially bad. His tone suggested that it would top the record set in such places as the U.S.A. and Newfoundland. When an Archbishop gives you advanced warning, you know that what is coming is not pleasant.

How has Benedict XVI reacted to this problem? He has signed a document--the biggest mistake of his pontificate by far--which replaced a defective 1961 seminary document with a far worse one, one which allows sexual inverts into the seminaries if they have managed not to 'get caught' for three consecutive years. This MUST go. We need an absolute ban on anyone having any past proclivities from entering seminary or proceeding to ordination; and we need a system of psychological and even polygraphy tests to weed out the weeds.

Who put this sick document on the Pope's desk? Why it was Zenon Cardinal Grocholewsky, Prefect for Education and a member of the last pope's 'Polish mafia', and Archbishop Michael Miller, Secretary of the same Congregation. Miller has since been demoted to Vancouver, kicked upstairs as its new ordinary. In the case of G., I'm betting that the Pope is waiting for a major Polish diocese to become vacant so that he can exile him to it. Because the man is a cardinal, he can't just go anywhere but must get Krakow or Warsaw or something.

But all this is closing the stable doors after the horse has bolted. I urge everyone to pray for the victims of this abuse, for the priesthood, and for the Church, especially in Ireland. I have a bad feeling that we are in for a rough ride, and that the pagans (in the extended sense, Jordanes) in the Republican Government of Ireland will now be licking their lips and relishing the thought of destroying the Church there. First to go will be the law against abortion. The devil is indeed a ravenous wolf.

P.K.T.P.

Anonymous said...

That is how it goes in the church today... Dialog, dialog and more dialog. 25-50% of the priests are homosexuals...

What about the Winnipeg statement...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winnipeg_Statement

...and all the pro-abortion catholic politicians. Dialog...

Will the Vatican do something... Dialog...

Rick DeLano said...

The Holy Father spoke of cleaning the filth from the Church before his election.

Let us cease, at last, from equivocation.

The infiltration of the religious orders, the priesthood, and the episcopacy by homosexualist evil has proceeded to the point where the Bride of Christ is now shamed in the eyes of a sinful world.

It is up to the laity.

The Church must be reformed now from the bottom up.

Those who hold the Catholic Faith must be differentiated from those who hold the masonic doctrines of the woeful, evil and perverted homosexualist cult within the Church.

Anonymous said...

No. The only thing Christ warns us to do is to repent our own sins and pray and keep watch. We must keep watch over our own sinful souls and let God manage all of this. Do not let the devil lure you away from your own repentence. Christ warned these things will come. Do not fear though for this beautiful Catholic Church remains Christ as our current Godhead, she WILL withstand this to God's greater glory. Do not be deceived away from confession of your own sins, penance. Please leave God in charge of all this.
We are in a very very very dangerous game with cunning evil to lure each of us into his evils and away from virtuously persevering in our private battles of our own sins. Look not at others, please, remain focused on your own evil soul. God Bless You, Nancy

Catholic Observer said...

Remember all the names given in the report are FALSE. The Christian Brothers successfully sued the Commission to prevent the names of convicted abusers from being named in this report.

It's already elicited calls for church property to be confiscated.

Plinko said...

Anon #4 said: "The only thing Christ warns us to do is to repent our own sins and pray and keep watch. We must keep watch over our own sinful souls and let God manage all of this. Do not let the devil lure you away from your own repentence."

This is actually not correct. Yes, we must be vigilant of our own salvation, but we are also commanded to look out for one another. The Gospels are full of Christ's instructions about how we are to act in relation to the community. We are comunal, not islands.

Anonymous said...

Sorry, just another thought on my first. In the 4th comment down, the gentleman's last paragraph, 'Those who hold the Catholic faith...'
Do you not see how we are judging? Does not Christ love even moreso the sinner than the just? You see where one can head, cunningly straying from repenting your own souls by lurings to the evils of others? Yes the church is showing sin, Christ himself placed His Church on the shoulders of sinners. We must pray for great holy wisdom that Christ knows this current display of evil. Do not get lured by Satan himself to judge the sinners, when you are missing God's love showing you you are the sinner He cares about. Repent and pray and understand God's charity can save these sinners if we would just cooperate with Him.

He also requires us to be at peace, we must be obedient to this also! How? By leaving these evils and in silence learn to love examinations of our own consciense, pray, confess and we will obey this command also.

The devil is your worse enemy much much greater than any homosexual priest doing the worse. The devil hates you thoroughly in and out and will do anything for you to continue hating for you are naively being worse than him. Repent! Nancy

Anonymous said...

Rick said: "The infiltration of the religious orders, the priesthood, and the episcopacy by homosexualist evil has proceeded to the point where the Bride of Christ is now shamed in the eyes of a sinful world."

Shamed because it is now so well known. Let's not kid ourselves into thinking that homosexuality is some new phenomenon in the church.

Anonymous said...

Plinko,

I'd go much further. The first spiritual Act of Mercy is "to admonish the sinner". Nancy's comments sound all too much like the liberals' constant error regarding judgement, in which they say that we can judge the sin but not the sinner. They normally misinterpret our Lord's words on this: Judge not, &c.

That is NOT the Catholic teaching. We can and should and are sometimes duty-bound to judge the sinner's character and not just the sin. What we may not do is to judge his culpability. What does this mean? Simply put, it means that we can and MUST judge the rapist to be a rapist (and, at times, we must call him a rapist and a pervert) but we must not suggest that we are better than the rapist, for only God knows where everyone stands. Hence our Lord adds that, by what judgement you judge, you shall be judged yourself.

Nancy is right insofar as she is reminding us that we should never say or even imply, "I am better than the child abuser". She is wrong insofar as she says, "We must not call the child abuser a child abuser". There are times when we must do so. For example, it may be necessary to warn innocents about the abuser or to remonstrate with the abuser for his own good. It may also be necessary to accuse the abuser in order to prevent the abuse of other children. Had someone done so in this first Irish case here, this abuser might not have gone on to abuse more and more children. This would have helped both the children AND the abuser.

Nancy is also wrong insofar as she says that we must look only to our own sins. No, we are our brothers' keepers. We try to save ourselves but others also.

It is true that we may elect to concentrate on healing ourselves and turn to a life of mortification and prayer, only praying for others' sins in general. In an extreme case, a hermit does not even look to the particular sins of other religious. But we are also called to defend the innocent and punish absuers. God is just and not only merciful.

We are now facing massive abuse cases all because the people who should have taken action to stop it covered it up instead.

P.K.T.P.

Louis E. said...

Given the Christian Brothers' determination to protect the malefactors among them,they should be told by any from whom they seek support that this will be withheld until the guilty are named and shamed.

Cardinal Grochelewski is only months younger than the Archbishop of Krakow and a decade older than the Arcbbishop of Warsaw,so do not look for him to get either see.The only prominent Polish post with a holder past retirement age is the ancient Primatial see of Gniezno,and I expect Archbishop Muszynski will stay on past Cardinal Glemp's 80th birthday in December when the Primacy formally is returned to that see (once joined with Warsaw).

It might be seen as a blow to the "Polish mafia",however,that is youngest prominent member,Kristof Nitkiewicz,Undersecretary of the Congregation for Oriental Churches,now has an even younger Secretary over him (Cyril Vasil,who also displaced JP II's former secreteary Archbishop Mokrzycki of Lviv as the youngest Archbishop in the entire Church).

Jordanes said...

She is wrong insofar as she says, "We must not call the child abuser a child abuser". There are times when we must do so. For example, it may be necessary to warn innocents about the abuser or to remonstrate with the abuser for his own good. It may also be necessary to accuse the abuser in order to prevent the abuse of other children. . . . Nancy is also wrong insofar as she says that we must look only to our own sins. No, we are our brothers' keepers. We try to save ourselves but others also.*** She’d be wrong if that’s really what she were saying. It’s not apparent that is her intent. Hopefully it’s not.

Anonymous said...

Thank you for your thoughtfulness. Yes, yes, children must be always protected and the truth always must be stated. 'You are a harm' must be acknowledged. I admit the justice and administration of order is far above me.

Honestly, these comments hit right on home as to my own recent sins. Today, a mistreatment by someone I don't care for and I refused to comply to a request - I secretly judged them unworthy and so I sinfully refused to submit to their will (their request). I know I essentially refused God's will in this. I am blessed to see I judged this person, hated and so I would not condescend to their request.
Forgiveness, understanding myself how easy and secretly I can judge another - and I then cannot be kind, submit my will to theirs to learn humility and I disobeyed rebelliously God's trial for me.
This is the essense of my thought to repent - despite the evils we see around us. Sin is so cleverly hidden, I am so mistakenly righteous hiding my evil.
This was my only intent in my comment - forgiveness is the foundation, mercy to all sinners. Christ bled to death to offer this to us and I'd like to live this way myself. Repent and just begin to try and understand mercy. Nancy

Paul Haley said...

The whole point of this thread, I think, is that sexual abuse must not be tolerated, not by clergy and not by us. Yes, we are all sinners but that doesn't mean that we should condone or excuse the evil or the evil-doers.

Anonymous said...

to Paul H. +1

Anonymous said...

"Who put this sick document on the Pope's desk?"

Why is it always someone else? The Pope does not know anything...Hmmm.

The infiltration of the Church by spurious elements is a subject of such complexity that it will take me at least ten years to grasp it all.

Anonymous said...

On your last comment about Nancy, Jordanes, I apologise for not clarifying. I tried to use 'insofar' but that was not the right word here. I meant that there is a parallel between those who say that we should only look to our own sins and those who say that we should not judge the character of others. I did not mean that Nancy necessarily takes the second view here but I have noticed that many people take both lines.

To re-state this: 1. No, Nancy we need to look to others' sins and not only our own; we do not simply leave God to manage the rest; 2. Similarly (although Nancy has not asserted this), we need to judge others' characters and not only their acts. We judge their characters but not the degree of their culpability.

P.K.T.P.

Anonymous said...

Beware! Do not let scandals become an occasion for sin.
Punishing and judging is for those in authority, the rest of us would do well to keep our eyes on Christ.

Anonymous said...

Truly shameful.

Anonymous said...

Nancy,

You don't want us to judge child abusers yet you utter the following statement:

"Repent and just begin to try and understand mercy."

HOw is that anything other than a judgement, and as such, contrary to your apparent principles??

It's quite clear that you position is one fuelled by emotion, which is just not good enough in this dire situation.

Anonymous said...

It seems to me that there are certain deeds which are manifestly evil. There are those which are good. These are to be judged as such. There are some acts which are ambiguous. These should be given the benefit of the doubt and judgement left to God. The abuse which is the topic of these posts obviously falls into the first catagory.

Anonymous said...

Do we have distribution of victims by age and sex?

Anonymous said...

I think most craddle Catholics have known of this sort of thing and yet not known as well. Within the Church groups such as the Irish Christian Brothers, Marist Brothers and the religious Orders protect and excuse there own in action but maybe not words. This sort of covering up and excusing is endemic. Look at how little influence the local bishop had when Notre Dame (Congregation of the Holy Cross)gave Obama his doctorate. My own school currently has 6 priest and brothers before the courts. It happened because it was thought tolerant not to heed the warning signs. Clergy and religious rarely break ranks. Why? Because the good ones theologically, morally, liturgically, in every ideal way are dragged down by the others!

M.A. said...

PKTP: "...No, Nancy we need to look to others' sins and not only our own;"

I agree with this comment only in so far as we "look to others' sins" so as to make reparation for their offenses against God, this along with reparation for our own sins, of course.

There are so many good people who are rightfully scandalized, but very, very few understand that God is owed reparation-PUBLIC reparation at that! Why aren't Catholics organizing rosary processions of reparation in the towns where they live? If reparation is not made, God will punish this world as we justly deserve, sparing neither the good nor the bad.

REPARATION, people! REPARATION! Our Lady cries because God is so greatly offended and there are very few souls who love him enough to make reparations for the sins of others.

Anonymous said...

Annonymous, P.K.T.P., said that the Archbishop of Dublin had warned people about this report.The report discussed is NOT the report he warned about ; it is on abuse within the Archdiocese of Dublin [yesterday's was about institutions in Ireland]. The Dublin report - which we have been warned will be horrific will be published next month. The Irish and violently anti-Catholic newspapers and media are having a vicious gloat today. Yet, the Orders, with the exception of one, seemed to have been unwilling to co-operate in the report's research.
Alan Robinson

rev'd up said...

Ireland is famous for its Jansenism/Puritanism; which always leads to perverted sexuality. The international sex scandal absolutely destroys the Church's credibility in the eyes of both believers and non-believers. And the Pope is silent! Nay, he rather offers praise for Obama's ND speech!

It's simple. The early Church had to explain false notions of canibalism; the modern Church has to explain buggery.

The Church: guilty of the whoredoms of Israel. We can look forward to the prophecy of Josiah (II Paralipomenon(Chronicles) xxxiv.21).

SALVA NOS DOMINE!

Anonymous said...

One anonymous writer writes:

"Beware! Do not let scandals become an occasion for sin.
Punishing and judging is for those in authority, the rest of us would do well to keep our eyes on Christ."

Punishing is indeed for those in authority. Judging, however, is not restricted to those in authority. That notion is false. We are all called upon to judge the character of the sinner in order to protect the innocent and correct the malefactor. Again, we are allowed and sometimes even required to judge the sinner's character and not only his act. What we must not do is to judge the degree of his culpability in comparison with that of ourselves or others. *That* is where the distinction is to be made. It is absolutely correct to call a rapist a rapist. What is wrong is to assert that I am better than the rapist. Only God knows where each of us stands.

The modern liberal says--even from the pulpit--that it is bad to call a rapist a rapist. That is DEAD WRONG.

Another writer says that we should look to others' sins only in order to make reparation for them. This is also mistaken. Making reparation for them is certainly good and even necessary but it is not the only end of judging others' characters. We also do it to pray for the reformation of the sinner, to warn innocents to avoid the sinner's company, to warn society that the sinner's actions are dangerous or bad, and to reprove the sinner in the hope of reforming him and thereby saving his soul. I am sick and tired of these pansies dressed in peace-symbol chasubles who tell us that we musn't call a spade a spade or a rapist a rapist. They are dead wrong and don't know the faith. The saying 'judge the sin but not the sinner' is totally incorrect.

P.K.T.P.

Anonymous said...

Dear Mr. Robinson:

Thank for the clarification, although I suppose we'd all rather not know that there will be even more bad news coming. Let us just pray that the Church is not completely disempowered by all of this. The European politicos are just waiting to swoop in and bring abortion to Ireland. The way to do it is to eliminate the competition, which is Holy Church.

P.K.T.P.

Rick DeLano said...

Nancy:

Thank you. Believe me, I hear you. It is absolutely true that when I am called to give an account of my stewardship, there will be very much indeed for which I will have nothing to do but tremble.

But I promise you Nancy that the Lord will find no occasion to spew me out of His Mouth for lukewarmness.

I thank the poster who suggested a procession in reparation.

That sounds to me like an excellent example of what I had inchoately in mind when I spoke of reforming the Church from the bottom up.

Anonymous said...

Rick DeLano, thanks for writing, I beg forgiveness for calling you out on your thoughts. I too am working out my salvation with hopeful true contrition and trembling - it's all that is important to me, the Will of God (which I can only discern for myself).
Let us continue to labor with each other towards God's Will, His Love, His Way. It is darkness down here and without Him I make daily, many many mistakes. Forgive me, Sister in Christ, Nancy

John McFarland said...

Those who counsel acts of reparation counsel well. Whatever the truth of the matter, there is surely plenty to make reparation for.

But I wouldn't take the report at anything like face value. According to the New York Times article on the report, there's been some serious money handed out in Ireland in connection with the scandals; and where there's money to be had for horror stories, there will be more than a few prepared to say what it takes to get some. (It's also not terribly clear from the Times story where a good chunk of the money is coming from.)

It also appears from the Times story that the alleged victims, like the alleged abusers, are anonymous. If that's right, it might explain why the Irish Christian Brothers were successful in keeping the names of the alleged abusers confidential. I also wouldn't take for granted the veracity of those who don't identity themselves or submit to cross-examination.

Finally, I see from the Times piece that David Clohessy, America's own professional victim of clerical sexual abuse, is on the scene. Like others, I wonder what his story is, and where his money comes from.

We must be as wise as serpents, and as innocent as doves, and watch and pray.

John McFarland said...

I would also ask about Mrs. Engel's book: what is the point of reading it? Nobody doubts that at least a quarter to a half of the U.S. clergy are sodomites, and the only question about the U.S. church's governance is whether the sodomites run it, or just have veto power over it. What more is there to say on the topic, and what more is there to do but to pray?

Anonymous said...

"The infiltration of the Church by spurious elements is a subject of such complexity that it will take me at least ten years to grasp it all".

And it will need a new Trent to clean.

Anonymous said...

I wouldn't worry too much about this issue, even though it was horrible....because God in hs own good time delivers his own judgement on these paedophiles and other deviants and the accomplices who by inaction or worse aid in the crimes/sins before God.

Just look at the Vatican II Catholic Church!

Before Vatican II, and up until the Council (but mostly in the 1900's thru the mid 1950's), the Catholic Church in Ireland was exporting +1,000 priests per year, as well as 2x the number of nuns for missionary work. Ireland ordained (before Vatican II), close to 1,600 priests per year! They had at least 8 huge diosecean seminaries. Orders of nuns, cloisters, and seminaries for priests were filled. The De la Salle Christian brothers, and the Irish Christian Brothers were bursting with vocations.
Today, 40+ years after the disaster of Vatican II and it's implementation, and after the reign of 4 Vatican II Popes, there is but 1 seminary in all Ireland for diosecean priests. ONE. And that seminary, which had had 1,000 seminarians before Vatican II, has a handful today.
ALL religious Orders of nuns in Ireland have gone the way of USA nuns in their dissent and radicalization...and discarding the habit. They have closed houses by the hundreds, and have a median age like the USA, approaching 75.
Mass attendance has declined form 80% (still very high when JP II became Pope in 1978), down to less than 35% today. But then again, what can we expect?

So, God has had his judgement on these perverts. The Bishops as a whole are disgraced (but have not been disiplined enough), the priesthood is ruined. Orders of nuns are all dead, as are the Brothers.
Few go to Mass or any other Sacraments.
It will take 200 years to restore in Ireland and elsewhere, what Vatican II and what came after it destroyed in 40+ years!

The great Cardinal Giuseppe Siri once said (no lover of Vatican II or the Vatican II years that man!!), that it would take the entire Church 200 years to recover from the disaster of Vatican II.
Looking at Ireland, the USA, and elsewhere...he was right.

Anonymous said...

Anon. said:

"I think most craddle Catholics have known of this sort of thing and yet not known as well. Within the Church groups such as the Irish Christian Brothers, Marist Brothers and the religious Orders protect and excuse there own in action but maybe not words."

I suppose that this is true today but it was not true when I was taught by Brothers in elementary and high school not so very long ago. Before about 1985, most people did not even dare think that religious or ecclesiastics in teaching orders might be doing these things. From the record in Canada, I believe that the orders which had charge over reformatories and orphanages attracted the abusers, and not those running ordinary schools. But even that was 'out of sight and out of mind' for most people before 1985.

The liberals, of course, claim that this abuse was always going on and that a celibate priesthood is a natural hiding place for sexual inverts. We only know about post-conciliar cases because they are more recent and because, in the authoritarian days, cases were not believed and not reported. They then use this to argue for an end to celibacy.

This is a fallacy of reasoning known as the argumentum ad ignorantium. However, it is at least a plausible position and attracts 'suspicious minds'. These revelations will continue to deter conversions. Who wants to convert to a Church whose clergy is seemingly filled with perverts?

P.K.T.P.

Anonymous said...

Read this: http://www.olavodecarvalho.org/traducoes/pedophilia.htm

Anonymous said...

Read this: http://www.olavodecarvalho.org/traducoes/pedophilia.htm

Sick bastards, God protect our young people and our seminarians.

The fags are also complaining against the Diocese of Maine. At least Bishop Malone is making a stand.
http://www.onenewsnow.com/Culture/Default.aspx?id=539478