Rorate Caeli

The Gospel transcends the world

Precisely because the Gospel is not an ideology, it does not presume to lock evolving socio-political realities into rigid schemas. Rather, it transcends the vicissitudes of this world and casts new light on the dignity of the human person in every age. Dear friends, let us ask the Lord to implant within us a spirit of courage to share the timeless saving truths which have shaped, and will continue to shape, the social and cultural progress of this continent.

The salvation wrought by Jesus’s suffering, death, resurrection and ascension into heaven not only transforms us who believe in him, but urges us to share this Good News with others. Enlightened by the Spirit’s gifts of knowledge, wisdom and understanding (cf. Is 11:1-2; Ex 35:31), may our capacity to grasp the truth taught by Jesus Christ impel us to work tirelessly for the unity he desires for all his children reborn through Baptism, and indeed for the whole human race.
Benedict XVI
September 27, 2009

4 comments:

John McFarland said...

"Enlightened by the Spirit’s gifts of knowledge, wisdom and understanding (cf. Is 11:1-2; Ex 35:31), may our capacity to grasp the truth taught by Jesus Christ impel us to work tirelessly for the unity he desires for all his children reborn through Baptism, and indeed for the whole human race."

What unity can the Church bring to the whole human race, when most of it has not been reborn through Baptism, and a substantial part of those who have been reborn are heretics and schismatics?

Jordanes said...

There have always been unbaptised people, heretics, and schismatics. That has never prevented the Church from enjoying the God's gift of unity which she brings and offers to the whole human race.

John McFarland said...

Jordanes,

Then why does he not say, "the unity he desires for all his children now reborn though baptism, and for all other man and women through their likewise coming to that rebirth?"

Is the problem that he is not clever enough to express the point as clearly as I can? Or as you could?

The best face you can put on this kind of Benedictine statement (and there really is no other kind)is that he's saying something equivocal so that everybody -- real Catholics, liberal Catholics, unbelievers -- can say that he pretty much agrees with them.

And if you let each of them unravel the meaning for themselves, they can indeed all be right, by their lights.

But: how can you square this with the Lord's injunction that your yes be yes, and you no, no?

Jordanes said...

Then why does he not say, "the unity he desires for all his children now reborn though baptism, and for all other man and women through their likewise coming to that rebirth?"

Because he was talking only to people who have already been baptised.

Is the problem that he is not clever enough to express the point as clearly as I can? Or as you could?

No, I think he's far more clever than we are.

The best face you can put on this kind of Benedictine statement (and there really is no other kind)is that he's saying something equivocal so that everybody -- real Catholics, liberal Catholics, unbelievers -- can say that he pretty much agrees with them.

Nonsense. It's impossible to honestly, accurately read his words in a way that liberal Catholics and unbelievers could agree with. Liberal Catholics and unbelievers don't believe there is anything special about the truth taught by Jesus Christ, nor that it is important for baptised Christians to be united, nor that the whole human race share in the same unity that Jesus Christ gave the Catholic Church.