Rorate Caeli

Complementary norms for the Apostolic Constitution Anglicanorum coetibus

Jurisdiction of the Holy See

Article 1

Each Ordinariate is subject to the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith. It maintains close relations with the other Roman Dicasteries in accordance with their competence.

Relations with Episcopal Conferences and Diocesan Bishops

Article 2

§1. The Ordinary follows the directives of the national Episcopal Conference insofar as this is consistent with the norms contained in the Apostolic ConstitutionAnglicanorum coetibus.

§2. The Ordinary is a member of the respective Episcopal Conference.

Article 3

The Ordinary, in the exercise of this office, must maintain close ties of communion with the Bishop of the Diocese in which the Ordinariate is present in order to coordinate its pastoral activity with the pastoral program of the Diocese.

The Ordinary

Article 4

§1. The Ordinary may be a bishop or a presbyter appointed by the Roman Pontiff ad nutum Sanctae Sedis, based on a terna presented by the Governing Council. Canons 383-388, 392-394, and 396-398 of the Code of Canon Law apply to him.

§2. The Ordinary has the faculty to incardinate in the Ordinariate former Anglican ministers who have entered into full communion with the Catholic Church, as well as candidates belonging to the Ordinariate and promoted to Holy Orders by him.

§3. Having first consulted with the Episcopal Conference and obtained the consent of the Governing Council and the approval of the Holy See, the Ordinary can erect as needed territorial deaneries supervised by a delegate of the Ordinary covering the faithful of multiple personal parishes.

The Faithful of the Ordinariate

Article 5

§1. The lay faithful originally of the Anglican tradition who wish to belong to the Ordinariate, after having made their Profession of Faith and received the Sacraments of Initiation, with due regard for Canon 845, are to be entered in the apposite register of the Ordinariate. Those baptized previously as Catholics outside the Ordinariate are not ordinarily eligible for membership, unless they are members of a family belonging to the Ordinariate.

§2. Lay faithful and members of Institutes of Consecrated Life and Societies of Apostolic Life, when they collaborate in pastoral or charitable activities, whether diocesan or parochial, are subject to the Diocesan Bishop or to the pastor of the place; in which case the power of the Diocesan Bishop or pastor is exercised jointly with that of the Ordinary and the pastor of the Ordinariate.

The Clergy

Article 6

§1. In order to admit candidates to Holy Orders the Ordinary must obtain the consent of the Governing Council. In consideration of Anglican ecclesial tradition and practice, the Ordinary may present to the Holy Father a request for the admission of married men to the presbyterate in the Ordinariate, after a process of discernment based on objective criteria and the needs of the Ordinariate. These objective criteria are determined by the Ordinary in consultation with the local Episcopal Conference and must be approved by the Holy See.

§2. Those who have been previously ordained in the Catholic Church and subsequently have become Anglicans, may not exercise sacred ministry in the Ordinariate. Anglican clergy who are in irregular marriage situations may not be accepted for Holy Orders in the Ordinariate.

§3. Presbyters incardinated in the Ordinariate receive the necessary faculties from the Ordinary.

Article 7

§1. The Ordinary must ensure that adequate remuneration be provided to the clergy incardinated in the Ordinariate, and must provide for their needs in the event of sickness, disability, and old age.

§2. The Ordinary will enter into discussion with the Episcopal Conference about resources and funds which might be made available for the care of the clergy of the Ordinariate.

§3. When necessary, priests, with the permission of the Ordinary, may engage in a secular profession compatible with the exercise of priestly ministry (cf. CIC, can. 286).

Article 8

§1. The presbyters, while constituting the presbyterate of the Ordinariate, are eligible for membership in the Presbyteral Council of the Diocese in which they exercise pastoral care of the faithful of the Ordinariate (cf. CIC, can. 498, §2).

§2. Priests and Deacons incardinated in the Ordinariate may be members of the Pastoral Council of the Diocese in which they exercise their ministry, in accordance with the manner determined by the Diocesan Bishop (cf. CIC, can. 512, §1).

Article 9

§1. The clerics incardinated in the Ordinariate should be available to assist the Diocese in which they have a domicile or quasi-domicile, where it is deemed suitable for the pastoral care of the faithful. In such cases they are subject to the Diocesan Bishop in respect to that which pertains to the pastoral charge or office they receive.

§2. Where and when it is deemed suitable, clergy incardinated in a Diocese or in an Institute of Consecrated Life or a Society of Apostolic Life, with the written consent of their respective Diocesan Bishop or their Superior, can collaborate in the pastoral care of the Ordinariate. In such case they are subject to the Ordinary in respect to that which pertains to the pastoral charge or office they receive.

§3. In the cases treated in the preceding paragraphs there should be a written agreement between the Ordinary and the Diocesan Bishop or the Superior of the Institute of Consecrated Life or the Moderator of the Society of Apostolic Life, in which the terms of collaboration and all that pertains to the means of support are clearly established.

Article 10

§1. Formation of the clergy of the Ordinariate should accomplish two objectives: 1) joint formation with diocesan seminarians in accordance with local circumstances; 2) formation, in full harmony with Catholic tradition, in those aspects of the Anglican patrimony that are of particular value.

§2. Candidates for priestly ordination will receive their theological formation with other seminarians at a seminary or a theological faculty in conformity with an agreement concluded between the Ordinary and, respectively, the Diocesan Bishop or Bishops concerned. Candidates may receive other aspects of priestly formation at a seminary program or house of formation established, with the consent of the Governing Council, expressly for the purpose of transmitting Anglican patrimony.

§3. The Ordinariate must have its own Program of Priestly Formation, approved by the Holy See; each house of formation should draw up its own rule, approved by the Ordinary (cf. CIC, can. 242, §1).

§4. The Ordinary may accept as seminarians only those faithful who belong to a personal parish of the Ordinariate or who were previously Anglican and have established full communion with the Catholic Church.

§5. The Ordinariate sees to the continuing formation of its clergy, through their participation in local programs provided by the Episcopal Conference and the Diocesan Bishop.

Former Anglican Bishops

Article 11

§1. A married former Anglican Bishop is eligible to be appointed Ordinary. In such a case he is to be ordained a priest in the Catholic Church and then exercises pastoral and sacramental ministry within the Ordinariate with full jurisdictional authority.

§2. A former Anglican Bishop who belongs to the Ordinariate may be called upon to assist the Ordinary in the administration of the Ordinariate.

§3. A former Anglican Bishop who belongs to the Ordinariate may be invited to participate in the meetings of the Bishops’ Conference of the respective territory, with the equivalent status of a retired bishop.

§4. A former Anglican Bishop who belongs to the Ordinariate and who has not been ordained as a bishop in the Catholic Church, may request permission from the Holy See to use the insignia of the episcopal office.

The Governing Council

Article 12

§1. The Governing Council, in accord with Statutes which the Ordinary must approve, will have the rights and responsibilities accorded by the Code of Canon Law to the College of Consultors and the Presbyteral Council.

§2. In addition to these responsibilities, the Ordinary needs the consent of the Governing Council to:

a) admit a candidate to Holy Orders;

b) erect or suppress a personal parish;

c) erect or suppress a house of formation;

d) approve a program of formation.

§3. The Ordinary also consults the Governing Council concerning the pastoral activities of the Ordinariate and the principles governing the formation of clergy.

§4. The Governing Council has a deliberative vote:

a. when choosing a terna of names to submit to the Holy See for the appointment of the Ordinary;

b. when proposing changes to the Complementary Norms of the Ordinariate to present to the Holy See;

c. when formulating the Statutes of the Governing Council, the Statutes of the Pastoral Council, and the Rule for houses of formation.

§ 5. The Governing Council is composed according to the Statutes of the Council. Half of the membership is elected by the priests of the Ordinariate.

The Pastoral Council

Article 13

§1. The Pastoral Council, constituted by the Ordinary, offers advice regarding the pastoral activity of the Ordinariate.

§2. The Pastoral Council, whose president is the Ordinary, is governed by Statutes approved by the Ordinary.

The Personal Parishes

Article 14

§1. The pastor may be assisted in the pastoral care of the parish by a parochial vicar, appointed by the Ordinary; a pastoral council and a finance council must be established in the parish.

§2. If there is no vicar, in the event of absence, incapacity, or death of the pastor, the pastor of the territorial parish in which the church of the personal parish is located can exercise his faculties as pastor so as to supply what is needed.

§3. For the pastoral care of the faithful who live within the boundaries of a Diocese in which no personal parish has been erected, the Ordinary, having heard the opinion of the local Diocesan Bishop, can make provisions for quasi-parishes (cf. CIC, can. 516, §1).

The Supreme Pontiff Benedict XVI, at the Audience granted to the undersigned Cardinal Prefect, approved these Complementary Norms for the Apostolic Constitution Anglicanorum coetibus, adopted in the Ordinary Session of the Congregation, and ordered their publication.

Rome, from the Offices of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, November 4, 2009, the Memorial of St. Charles Borromeo.

William Card. Levada
Prefect

+ Luis. F. Ladaria, S.I.
Titular Archbishop of Thibica
Secretary

17 comments:

Anonymous said...

Um, look at this complementary norm, Section 2:

"Those who have been previously ordained in the Catholic Church and subsequently have become Anglicans, may not exercise sacred ministry in the Ordinariate. Anglican clergy who are in irregular marriage situations may not be accepted for Holy Orders in the Ordinariate."

The first sentence here would appear to exclude Archbishop Hepworth entirely here, along with certain of their priests.

Am I reading this aright? Does it mean that those among their clerics who, say, started as Anglicans, converted to Catholicism and received a Holy Order (even the diaconate) and then left the Latin Church and went on to the TAC are excluded entirely?

P.K.T.P.

Jon said...

Mr. Perkins,

This is known as the "Cutie" section.

Joshua said...

Look at the norms for former Anglican bishops - which Hepworth will be... perhaps there is a gracious loophole supplied, even if he will be as it were taking early retirement (he's 65).

He has previously said he works for unity, even at the cost of laying aside his mitre and all - in charity, this is a noble example of self-sacrifice, whatever may be thought of his leaving the Catholic Church for the Anglicans back in 1976. God writes straight with crooked lines...

beng said...

As I understand, Hepworth has irregular marriage (he remarried).

Not only that would exclude him from the priesthood, that would also exclude him from communion until he get an annulment or separate with his current "wife."

But since, according to Anglicanus coetibus this new Anglican Ordinariate could set up their own marriage tribunal when they could.... [I'll let you all fill in the blank].

Joshua said...

Pretty obviously, Hepworth wouldn't be the prime mover in seeking reunion with Rome if he hadn't got advice that his situation can be regularized...

We should be glad about this, not grumpy and suspicious.

Anonymous said...

We should be glad that this Constitution is so hard-line Catholic, and not wishy-wishy sentimentalist for the Anglican way of doing things!

NO to a married clergy (except by rare exception)

NO to married seminarians.

NO to the exclusive use of just Anglican forms of worship.

NO to their present Anglican prayerbooks (until they have been purified by Rome)

NO to former Catholics/now Anglicans serving as priests

and finally, NO to married Anglican Bishops.

Seems to be that a lot of the things the TAC and other Anglicans wanted a pass for (married clergy, seminarians, maintaining solely their Anglican heritage etc.) they instead got a big rejection.

HURRAY!!!

Anonymous said...

I wonder if the last poster is even capable of reading English:

He/she/it writes:

"NO to a married clergy (except by rare exception)

NO to married seminarians."

If you think the apostolic constitution means this, you need to peruse this document much more closely. The norms to be approved by the Apostolic See need only be 'compatible' with current norms on these things. New norms are to be proposed by the ordinariates in consultation with (not by approval of) the episcopal conferences. Then Rome decids the matter.

So you are dead wrong. You need to read and think. Your attempts to steer the document in the direction of your choice will not work.

McFarland probably agrees with me on this but for very different reasons. In his case, he no doubt deplores the fact that this door has not been closed.

P.K.T.P.

Anonymous said...

Hooray then writes this:

"NO to the exclusive use of just Anglican forms of worship."


We shall see. Once the new Liturgy is approved (planned for next month), the ordinaries will be able to impose it on their priests to celebrate for the needs of the Anglican parishioners (cf. III: "so as to maintain the liturgical, spiritual and pastoral traditions of the Anglican Communion within the Catholic Church"). For additional Masses, Anglican clergy could indeed use other liturgies if and only if their ordinaries do not impose Canon 905 to prevent them from celebrating more than once a day. It is clear that, as moderator of the liturgy in his circumscription (cf. Redemptionis Sacramentum 19), and given the stated purpose of the ordinariates, the ordinaries can require that all their parish priests, church rectors, and chaplains, use the coming Anglican Liturgy; and Canon 905 makes it possible to do so restrictedly. So Hooray is wrong, except for the case of retired priests and those holding no appointment.


"NO to their present Anglican prayerbooks (until they have been purified by Rome)"


I agree! And this is a good thing, not a bad one. But this purification may come before you can pour yourself a cup of tea. It is supposedly coming next month--before these chaps even enter. If it comes before they enter, they can go directly to the new Anglican Liturgy from their present prayerbooks (except in India, where it will time to translate everything).



"NO to former Catholics/now Anglicans serving as priests"

Wrong! Totally wrong, as the Rev'd Up here discovered. Those who went from Catholic to Anglican cannot get incardinated into the new ordinariates. However, they can get incardinated into local Latin dioceses and then serve in the ordinariates and, when they do so, they are subject to the ordinary in all that concerns the ordinariate. True, the local Latin bishop may refuse them. But there is no general reason he should do so.


"and finally, NO to married Anglican Bishops._

Finally, Hooray is right about something. A good ending anyway

P.K.T.P.

Anonymous said...

Beng:

No, Hepworth cannot set up his own tribunal and then exonerate himself with a grant of nullity.

He will have to apply to the Church for the grant of nullity. But even so, there are problems for him, such as converting from Catholicism *back* to Anglicanims. But Rev'd Up has found the parachute clause which could get him around this.

The educational requirements in the new constitution are a separate problem. They essentially exclude most TAC priests. I expect that an exemptin package for existing priests will have to come.

P.K.T.P.

Anonymous said...

What should be made of this section?:

Those baptized previously as Catholics outside the Ordinariate are not ordinarily eligible for membership, unless they are members of a family belonging to the Ordinariate.

--

Should we assume that if you want to attend an ordinariate parish, you'd have to change rites like when a Latin goes to a Byzantine Catholic church?

Anonymous said...

Anon. writes:

"Should we assume that if you want to attend an ordinariate parish, you'd have to change rites like when a Latin goes to a Byzantine Catholic church?"


Now I had one rather mad uncle who occasionally banged his head against the wall. I am starting to know how he felt. How many times do I have to say it? You do NOT have to switch rites. Anyone can fulfil his Sunday obligation and/or go to confession in ANY RITE--and it fulfils the obligation. In other words, you can stay Latin and go only to Byzantine or Armenian Masses for years and years. I ought to know. I did exactly that for many years in my City, after our Latin Mass was cancelled. Now, finally, we've got it back.

In the case of Baptism, Marriage and burial, if you want to receive these in the ordinariate or in another write, it can be done by permission of your own bishop and the bishop of the church where it is to be done. Simple. Easy.

P.K.T.P.

Jordanes said...

Pretty obviously, Hepworth wouldn't be the prime mover in seeking reunion with Rome if he hadn't got advice that his situation can be regularized...

That is, he'll be able to receive Communion, and perhaps he might even be able to function as a priest -- but not as a bishop or ordinary.

Anonymous said...

Fr Hepworth married after he had been validly ordained priest in the Roman Catholic Church. Therefore his both marriages are undoubtly invalid - you don't need an annulment to know that.

Anonymous said...

PKTP,

Yes, that is obvious, but what about membership? It appears from what you are saying that I'll have to get permission from the bishop of each jurisdiction to become a parishioner of a personal parish.

The more interesting question on the ground will be whether parishes actually refuse parish membership (not mass attendance) to those who do not come from an Anglican background.

Jordanes said...

Yes, that is obvious, but what about membership? It appears from what you are saying that I'll have to get permission from the bishop of each jurisdiction to become a parishioner of a personal parish.

No, he didn't say anything of the sort. According to this apostolic constitution, if you're not an Anglican convert or a family member of a convert, you cannot be a member of an Anglican-Catholic ordinariate, and thus you cannot become a member of an Anglican-Catholic parish.

You may, however, freely assist at their liturgies, and participate in their parish life except in those ways that require parish membership.

The more interesting question on the ground will be whether parishes actually refuse parish membership (not mass attendance) to those who do not come from an Anglican background.

It's quite possible that some Anglican-Catholic parishes will violate the law and accept ineligible persons as members. But that won't change what the law says.

Anonymous said...

Jordanes, helping my explanations, writes:

"No, he didn't say anything of the sort. According to this apostolic constitution, if you're not an Anglican convert or a family member of a convert, you cannot be a member of an Anglican-Catholic ordinariate, and thus you cannot become a member of an Anglican-Catholic parish."

That's *almost* right, Jordanes. In fact, there is also a distinction between being a parishioner and a 'parish member'. Only former Anglicans could be members of the ordinariate and therefore parishioners in Anglican personal parishes. However, others can be 'parish members', which means that they can sit on parish councils and vote in parish council elections. Just a small clarification. I once sat on a Ukrainian Byzantine parish council and participated in elections for that. I was a 'parish member' there but not a parishioner.

But Jordanes's point is sound. The point is that, even though Latins cannot normally become members of the ordinariate or parishioners in its personal parishes, they can behave mostly as if they could. They can fulfil their Sunday obligation at the ordinariate's Masses, confess to their priests, and receive Extreme Unction from their priests. Even for the other Sacraments, they can receive them from the Ordinariate but only if they have permission from their own bishop.

De facto, it means that Latin conservatives and those Latin trads who don't have a T.L.M. available can escape to the Anglican ordinariate to avoid NewMass, NewOffertory, NewEucharisticPrayerNumberTwo, new songs on the banjo, hugathons at the Pax, and so forth.

P.K.T.P.

Anonymous said...

On Archbishop Hepworth:

The parachute clause found by Rev'd Up's brilliant and imaginative analysis means that Hepworth could theoretically end up as the ordinary for all of Australia or for Southern Australila (depending on what they ask for); and he would serve in that capacity as a simple priest.

However, I must say that this is extremely unlikely at this point. If there were only one thing against him in this constitution, well, that would be one thing. But there are two and both are serious. There is the marriage *after* consecration as a bishop and then a re-marriage. There is also the problem of having converted *twice*, and once to leave the Catholic Church. I think he'll get his annulment (who is ever refused?) and they will offer to make him a priest serving in an ordinariate, but not as the ordinary.

For some reason, I feel sorry for him and wish he could serve as ordinary. But my more rational side says that this would be unthikable and scandalous.

Instead of blaming him, however, I'd like to point out that much of the blame here belongs with his Anglican-Catholic Church of Australia, the TAC body there. Why why why did they elect a man with that record, esp. when they knew that union with Rome is desired.

I live in Victoria and all the TAC priests here are excellent, as far as I know. But I do know of a priest elsewhere in the Canadian TAC who is divorced. However, he's not remarried. I suppose that, in a case like that, the fault could have been entirely his wife's, so he cannot be faulted. But it points to the fact that Rome will have to investigate all sorts of things. I am wondering to what extent men joined the TAC because they wanted to get around Roman marriage rules. Just a thought.

P.K.T.P.