Rorate Caeli

The number of priests and seminarians per French diocese


SOURCE

14 comments:

Mornac said...

The figure on the left of each triptych indicates the number of priests incardinated in the department, the figure in the middle indicates the number of seminarians, and the figure on the right, the number of retired priests. The lower legend indicates the number of inhabitants per priest in each department.

Johnny Domer said...

I notice that Frejus-Toulon (on the Mediterranean coast by the Italian border, near Marseilles) boasts more seminarians than any other diocese save the Archdiocese of Paris. I also saw on the diocesan website that Mgr. Rey will be ordaining 13 more priests next month.

Anthony said...

58 in Frejus-Toulon? Who is the bishop and what is he doing?

Casa Santa Lidia said...

Wow -- worse than I thought.

Guy Fawkes said...

If I remember correctly, the bishop of Toulon has a very friendly approach to both FSSP and Neocathecumenals. This explains that. For the other dioceses, no comment is needed. Take a look at Evreux where Thiberville happens to stand in.

Anonymous said...

Bp Rey (Toulon-Fréjus) is one of the very few excellent Catholic bishops in France.
He has ordained last year the first trad. diocesan priest in the world !

Abp Rouet (Poitiers, a bigger diocese) is supposedly the "model" of FrenChurch, a sort of French Mahony : look at the desperate situation of his vocations ...

It speaks volume. But overall the situation of France after 40 years of raging "Renewal" is dire : the Church is dying in Western Europe, slowly killed by the neo-mods. Still these loonies are claiming for ... more neo-modernism !

Alsaticus

Afonso Miguel said...

Ritus Bracarensis back in Portugal!

Canons Regular of Saint John Cantius will offer Bracarensis Mass in Fátima.

See here: http://tribunaonline.blogs.sapo.pt/117081.html

Anonymous said...

"The figure on the left of each triptych indicates the number of priests incardinated in the department, the figure in the middle indicates the number of seminarians, and the figure on the right, the number of retired priests."

So, number of priests incardinated minus number of retired priests = the shockingly low number of active priests in France (many of them retiring as well in the next few years).

LeonG said...

The figure for active priests disguises the fact that retirement is not far off for many of them. When I was studying this several years ago, for example, more than half of the active priests in Paris were over 50 years of age. This has to be factored in also.

Carlos Antonio Palad said...

Hopefully someone can put up a similar chart for Germany, Belgium and Holland.

Et Expecto said...

Does anyone have the time to put thid information onto a spread sheet, so that the figures can be more easily analysed? Maybe, it already exists in that form.

Eric said...

I'm assuming this doesn't include the numbers of FSSPX priests in France?

Anonymous said...

Dear CAP and friends,

It would appear that the color coding seems to be off.

Unless I am reading this incorrectly, the blue/green-to-red spectrum is inversed. That is, the red areas appear to be the healthiest (least number of inhabitants per priest), whereas the blue/green areas are the least healthy (spiritually speaking).

Is this a correct reading of this map?

This would indicate that Paris is the most spiritually challenged in all of France, which is no surprise. And not a few dioceses exist where there is a priest for a population of less than 2500.

Sincerely,
MKT

Anonymous said...

Carlos, have you been to EUROPE?