Rorate Caeli

You Report & Comment: Saving an English Seminary

Concerned readers send us the following piece on the closing of the Ushaw Seminary. [We note in passing that, in addition to what our friends write, Ushaw Seminary seems a magnificent building for the works and as a formation house for the new Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham - the necessities of our new Anglican-Catholic brethren, most of them without assets or property, certainly need to be taken into consideration from now on regarding each and every case of closing of a Catholic building in Britain, as a matter of charity and common sense.]

The Trustees of Ushaw College, a 200-year-old Catholic seminary in the north of England standing in over 500 acres, announced on 8th October 2010 that the seminary would close at the end of the academic year (ie June 2011) if a development partner could not be found. Presumably, this meant that they were looking for a business to take over part of the site and relieve the college of some of the running costs of a large complex of buildings. In 1962 there were over 400 students there and priestly ordinations were running at over 20 per year. Now there are just 26 seminarians in total but the closure announcement has dismayed many as no warning was given about this decision. However, it is a magnificent complex set in over 500 acres and a group of lay people is trying to save it. 
Following a further meeting of the Trustees it was announced on 14th December 2010 that the ancillary businesses, including the hosting of conferences, would cease at the end of December 2010, and that all bookings after this date would be cancelled. By eliminating the conference activities, and the healthy income stream that they generated, the Trustees, who are the bishops of northern England, have struck a severe blow at any possibility of a rescue plan that they were supposedly seeking. It seems that this decision was ill-judged, premature, taken without wide consultation, and without any regard to the financial consequences. It was also dismissive of a sound business proposal that was put forward some weeks ago.
Ushaw College has very fine buildings, many designed by distinguished architects including members of the Pugin and Hansom families; St Cuthbert’s Chapel and the library being particularly notable. It also occupies a major place in the cultural, religious and educational heritage of the Catholicism in the north of England. Many are dismayed that its future is being dismissed without consultation and that there seems to be scant regard for those who have supported it during the past 200 years.
An on-line petition has been launched and some hard-hitting comments from clergy and previous seminarians give a clear indication why this seminary has failed. It is also known that some bishops will no longer send their young men to study there. If it is saved from closure then it is imperative for its future development that the current culture is changed and orthodoxy and obedience to the Magisterium are restored once again. It is only this that will attract young men once again to return, and bishops once again to feel comfortable in sending their young men there for their formation.
Anyone sharing this dismay at closure is invited to sign a petition which can be found at:
www.ipetitions.com/petition/ushaw/


13 comments:

Tom the Milkman said...

St. Cuthbert's Chapel is exquisite, as are the buildings of Upshaw College in general. I was there a number of times when I lived in England. I signed the petition, and pray others will take the time to do the same.

Anonymous said...

Didn't Cardinal Merry del Val go here?

Delphina

Anonymous said...

I was just about to post the fact about the truly Great Cardinal Merry del Val attending this Seminary, when I see that someone beat me to it! However, the answer to the question in the previous comment is: Yes, he most certainly did. He loved it and maintained his contacts and friendships made there. There are some very fine photos of his visit there in the 1920's. May he help us all!

Ben Vallejo said...

The Ordinariate needs a Cathedral. St Cuthbert's can serve as one.

LeonG said...

A poignant symbol of the NO debacle.

Et Expecto said...

Not only did cardinal Merry del Val attend Ushaw College as a student, but I think that he gave the cassock of Pope Pius X to the college, which is a great treasure.

Crouchback said...

Visited last week with my wife...very moving experience....

Hope to take a priest friend there tomorrow.....

it needs £2 million pounds / year just to keep it open...that is 50 pence / year from every Nominal Catholic in England...around 4 million Catholics in England...??? surely this shouldn't be too difficult to manage...???

Anonymous said...

the issue of Ushaw is not one of NO versus Ordinariate or anything else - it's a question of finance.

Mike Hennessy said...

It's a question of the death of the Church in the UK. How can liturgy substantively come into it when so few "Catholics" attend *any* Mass? Unless, of course, it's the liturgy that has driven them (or their parents) away - and made them think light of these holy things.

Carlos Antonio Palad said...

The Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham IS Catholic, and its members are Catholics. Let no one deny this!

Anonymous said...

Vi raccomando questo articolo sull'Ordinariato apparso sul prestigioso blog italiano Cantale Antonianum: "Confusioni anglicane e precisazioni Cattoliche"

http://www.cantualeantonianum.com/2011/01/confusioni-anglicane-e-precisazioni_18.html

Alessandro di Roma

Et Expecto said...

Concerning the finances of Ushaw College, I have the following to say.

I have had an opportunity to examine the books, although I am not allowed to disclose any information. I can, however, say thay until the end of 2010, much of the college was used as a conference centre and for tourist accommodation. This brought in good revenue, so the additional money required is very much less than indicated by Crouchback.

Crouchback said...

Glad to hear that.....I was quoting a rough estimate of a third party.....

So that makes it even cheaper to run.

One thing that does bother me about the whole thing....Why do they always go for great monumental buildings....some one should have put the brakes on....there will need to be quite a bit of care and maintenance...and that won't come cheap.....have you any insight about how much will need to be spent in ....say the next 10 years..?? maybe I shouldn't ask this on a board like this..???