Rorate Caeli

A beautiful Cathedral rises in Europe


Yes, it is still possible. 

Thanks to Francesco Colafemmina of Fides et Forma for providing several inspiring images of the future cathedral of Pristina (Kosovo/Serbia), located in the main city within the current Apostolic Administration of Prizren. 

The author of this beautiful work, dedicated to Blessed Teresa of Calcutta, is Italian architect Livio Sterlicchio.

28 comments:

Jacobitess said...

Yuppi!!!! I have the same goosebumps when I saw the plans for Thomas Aquinas College's chapel (wish that had been done before I graduated). Tradition may yet be the new trend!

Anonymous said...

Ohh, very nice! Thanks for posting!

But... Isn't the big majority of Kosovo muslim?

IM

Socrates said...

Correction - Priština is not in Serbia anymore, Kosovo is an independent republic.

This one also looks great:

http://sjnknox.org/

New Catholic said...

Socrates, that is far from an accepted fact in international law - there are more countries that did not recognize it than those that did. The Holy See itself has never recognized that declaration - which is why we used the double form, without a comma, and without an opinion on the matter.

Thanks,

NC

Socrates said...

Political and ecumenical correctness in mind, becase The Holy See doesn't want to edge on relationships with Serbia. The U. S. and EU states have recognized its independence, and Serbia doesn't exercise any authority over Kosovo, so the case is closed, the only problem is that some major political forces (as Russia and China) oppose its separation bacause of political consequences, but there is no ground for disputing its independance on international juridical terms whatsoever.

Knight of Malta said...

Beautiful!

And to think the Diocese of Orange County is thinking of bidding on The Crystal 'cathedral'!

That monstrosity makes the Taj Mahoney look downright Romanesque in comparison!

New Catholic said...

Not all E.U. states. Spain, for instance, and quite understandably, has not recognized it, and neither have Greece or Cyprus, which have experience in these matters... Other than those permanent members of the UNSC mentioned by you, India, Brazil, Mexico, most of Latin America, and South Africa have also refused to recognize it - so it is not exactly an unrepresentative portion of sovereign states.

I really do not presume to understand the motives of the Holy See in such a delicate matter - the construction of the Cathedral has been, nonetheless, negotiated with local authorities, which seems to show that the Holy See can navigate, as it has traditionally done, troubled waters, while protecting the interests of Catholics and the liberty of the Church.

NC

Anonymous said...

While having almost finished my studies in public international law I can tell you that it is not juridically 100% clear.

Meanwhile, one has to deal with a political reality, which tends to be that Kosovo exists as a separate state.

Nevertheless, this is not a blog for that kind of discussion. It's prudent of you to put both names.

What I heard from a friend who has recently visited Kosovo is that the cathedral is actually situated between a very busy road with lots of traffic and a shopping street.

Oh well, the more ppl come close to it, the more ppl may receive some graces that pass out thru the window or an open door ;)

IM

dcs said...

Knight of Malta,

The Diocese of Orange is bidding on the property ... it's not at all clear that they want the Crystal "Cathedral" building itself. The CC is selling the property and hopes to lease some of it back -- my guess is that this would include the property on which the CC is located.

Anonymous said...

Kosovo's independence is illegal under international law as has been ably documented: http://www.chroniclesmagazine.org/2007/07/05/kosovo-and-its-impact-on-us-foreign-policy/

Also I have to wonder if it will suffer the same fate as many other churches in Kosovo. By that I mean destroyed by peace-loving Albanian Muslims.

Anonymous said...

That church is beautiful!!!!!!

Anonymous said...

I recall that when national geographic was making a world map, there was some dispute over whether certain islands belonged to Russia or Japan. Both sides claimed the islands; I believe Japan claimed Russia illegally stole them after WWII.

National Geographic ended the debate by asking: who stamps my passport when I go there and who arrests me if I committ a crime there. When the rubber hits thats who runs the country, international law aside.

New Catholic said...

Well, that is unclear as well... Is it the UN? The E.U., through its Rule of Law Mission? Is it Kosovars?... What a mess...

Jordanes551 said...

Socrates is welcome to his personal opinion that Kosovo is an independent republic, but as New Catholic and others have pointed out, only a few nations agree with Socrates' personal opinion (and Serbia obviously does not and will never recognise the gang that calls itself the government of a purportedly independent Kosovo), which in any case has absolutely nothing to do with the fact that a beautiful new cathedral is being built in Priština.

Anonymous said...

How many catholics are in Albania & Kosovo today? I've heard that number is rapidly increasing...

Tripun said...

How many catholics are in Kosovo? And in Albania? I've heard that number is increasing last years...

Anthony said...

Kosovo is an integral part of Serbia. It's "independence" is indeed illegal under international law. That is why the Holy See does not recognize it. In addition, the Holy See knows that the entire Orthodox world sees the forcible dismemberment of Serbia by NATO as illegal, a criminal act carried out in contravention of the UN Charter, the North Atlantic Treaty and the US Constitution. I am not Orthodox but our Eastern brethren are right about this. It would do vast damage to any effort at Catholic/Orthodox rapprochement if the Holy See were to recognize Kosovo. The only way it could do so without damaging its own interests would be if Serbia were to recognize the legitimacy of "independent" Kosovo. Even the current Belgrade regime, eager to join Washington's hive of compliant states through NATO and EU membership, has not dared to recognize Kosovo's putative independence. As for the state of Christianity in the breakaway province, the seat of Serbian Orthodoxy, hundreds of Christian churches and shrines have been burned to the ground, many of great beauty and antiquity, to the complete indifference of the rest of the world.

Knight of Malta said...

dcs, according to the LA Times:

"A new and intriguing prospect for the Crystal Cathedral emerged Wednesday when the Roman Catholic Diocese of Orange said it was considering buying the bankrupt church in Garden Grove and converting it to a Catholic cathedral."

John McFarland said...

Did the LA Times say whether the Crystal Cathedral deal would include a Megachurch Use Ordinariate for such of Rev. Schuller and his flock as might be interested?

Titus said...

"The U. S. and EU states have recognized its independence, and Serbia doesn't exercise any authority over Kosovo"

Of course they did: they spent billions of dollars dropping bombs on it in the middle of a conflict they had no business being involved in, on a side they chose solely because it lacked an easily demonized strongman.

Malta said...

Did the LA Times say whether the Crystal Cathedral deal would include a Megachurch Use Ordinariate for such of Rev. Schuller and his flock as might be interested?

No, but I am envisioning a protestant-catholic ecumenical service ala Taiz, where all can receive fruit juice and crackers, whether catholic or hindu, protestant, whatever!

Louis E. said...

The failure of the government of the USA to realize that an acceptable solution for Kosovo
must stop somewhere,anywhere,short of complete independence from Serbia is appalling.The importance of Kosovo to Serbian history is too important to tolerate the EU/USA recognition,which ranks with the Russian assertion of Abkhazia's independence from Georgia.

Anonymous said...

The Albanian [insert what term you wish: terrorists, separatists, freedom-fighters] in Kosovo attack *Serbian* Orthodox churches, not, apparently, Christian churches indiscriminately. Serbian Orthodox churches belong, naturally enough, to Serbs, who, naturally enough, tend to oppose the creation of Kosovo as an Albanian state(let). So the question becomes: are they attacking the churches because they are Christian or because they are Serbian? Among the Kosovar Albanians is a Catholic minority which is not, to my knowledge, subjected to violence by Albanian or foreign Mohammedans in Kosovo. Additionally, there seems to be a movement among Albanians in Kosovo to abandon Mohammedanism for (Latin-Rite) Catholicism, among other reasons because they claim to have been Catholic before the Ottomans invaded and because a number of Albanian Mohammedans were crypto-Catholics for centuries. While the Church did not approve of the outward conformity to Mohammedanism (obviously), I'm sure the Church is pleased to see the descendants of crypto-Catholics make a decisive choice for Catholicism and against Mohammedanism. There seem to be national/patriotic undertones to this: the Albanian hero Skanderbeg renounced Mohammedanism, converted (reverted?) to Catholicism, and became a hero in the resistance to the Turk. Also, the Serbs are Orthodox, not Catholic. From what I see, the Catholic Albanians in Kosovo are just as opposed to Serbian rule as are the Mohammedans. Had the Serbs prevailed in Kosovo in the 90s, I wonder how many mosques would have been abandoned (along with their villages) and whether a new Catholic cathedral would be under construction in Pristina. Maybe there is nothing in reality to lend force to that hypothetical, maybe there is. The present reality is bad; that doesn't mean it's the worse imagineable. The Serbs have been the historical enemies of Catholic Croatia as well as of the Mohammedan, a fact Catholics should remember. "Don't make a badger a bishop" -- a plucky underdog may not be any more virtuous than the would-be Goliath, but, since he's the underdog, we don't get to see how he'd act were he the stronger in the contest. The Western powers should have thought of that before intervening to protect the KLA "underdog," with all their terrorist and jihadi affiliations. The paleocons (and Catholics especially) might want to remember this, too, before falling virtually for everything an advocate for Greater Serbia could hope for.

It is sad, in any case, that an Albanian triumph in Kosovo has often meant not only the defeat of Serbian national/patriotic objectives (whatever their morality) but also the destruction of Christian churches blessed by the Real Presence and the presence of icons. Would that this were not so!

~Bonifacius

Anonymous said...

Stunning, now thats Catholic!!!

Anonymous said...

Why would the Vatican take the side of Muslim thugs in a situation in which, as many have pointed out, is far from clear?

That the U.S. government and the E.U. actively push for a Muslim nation governed by terrorists/drug traffickers in the center of Europe is quite puzzling.

kellow said...

The construction on new churches in Eastern Europe is invaribly highly, highly political. Money is mysteriously found for expensive churches when there is a crying need for hospitals and schools. The doubling up of the towers is probably to emphasise the cathedral's presense and give two fingers to the Orthodox church. The very Italianate style in the Balkans is all politically loaded.

J. G. Ratkaj said...

The secession of Kosova was right and just, as it finally hit the brutish pan-greater-servian blood and soil nationalism, which has tormented the peoples of the western balkans for more than a century. Catholics in Kosova can exercise their religion freely, evangelize and support the new regime.

New Catholic said...

Well, I cannot say this was not a good debate - spirited, but mostly respectful. It seems it can be adequately closed now. Thank you.

NC