Rorate Caeli

Pope: 'Sound education in faith' is 'most urgent challenge' of the Church in America

From the address pronounced by the Holy Father today before the Bishops of the United States (Regions X-XIII -TX/OK/AR and West/Pacific) in their ad limina visit; theological dissent in Catholic colleges and universities is a major problem for the Church in the United States, the Pope says.

On the level of higher education, many of you have pointed to a growing recognition on the part of Catholic colleges and universities of the need to reaffirm their distinctive identity in fidelity to their founding ideals and the Church’s mission in service of the Gospel. Yet much remains to be done, especially in such basic areas as compliance with the mandate laid down in Canon 812 for those who teach theological disciplines. The importance of this canonical norm as a tangible expression of ecclesial communion and solidarity in the Church’s educational apostolate becomes all the more evident when we consider the confusion created by instances of apparent dissidence between some representatives of Catholic institutions and the Church’s pastoral leadership: such discord harms the Church’s witness and, as experience has shown, can easily be exploited to compromise her authority and her freedom.


It is no exaggeration to say that providing young people with a sound education in the faith represents the most urgent internal challenge facing the Catholic community in your country. The deposit of faith is a priceless treasure which each generation must pass on to the next by winning hearts to Jesus Christ and shaping minds in the knowledge, understanding and love of his Church. It is gratifying to realize that, in our day too, the Christian vision, presented in its breadth and integrity, proves immensely appealing to the imagination, idealism and aspirations of the young, who have a right to encounter the faith in all its beauty, its intellectual richness and its radical demands.

Here I would simply propose several points which I trust will prove helpful for your discernment in meeting this challenge.

First, as we know, the essential task of authentic education at every level is not simply that of passing on knowledge, essential as this is, but also of shaping hearts. There is a constant need to balance intellectual rigor in communicating effectively, attractively and integrally, the richness of the Church’s faith with forming the young in the love of God, the praxis of the Christian moral and sacramental life and, not least, the cultivation of personal and liturgical prayer

It follows that the question of Catholic identity, not least at the university level, entails much more than the teaching of religion or the mere presence of a chaplaincy on campus. All too often, it seems, Catholic schools and colleges have failed to challenge students to reappropriate their faith as part of the exciting intellectual discoveries which mark the experience of higher education. The fact that so many new students find themselves dissociated from the family, school and community support systems that previously facilitated the transmission of the faith should continually spur Catholic institutions of learning to create new and effective networks of support. In every aspect of their education, students need to be encouraged to articulate a vision of the harmony of faith and reason capable of guiding a life-long pursuit of knowledge and virtue. As ever, an essential role in this process is played by teachers who inspire others by their evident love of Christ, their witness of sound devotion and their commitment to that sapientia Christiana which integrates faith and life, intellectual passion and reverence for the splendor of truth both human and divine.

In effect, faith by its very nature demands a constant and all-embracing conversion to the fullness of truth revealed in Christ. He is the creative Logos, in whom all things were made and in whom all reality "holds together" (Col 1:17); he is the new Adam who reveals the ultimate truth about man and the world in which we live. In a period of great cultural change and societal displacement not unlike our own, Augustine pointed to this intrinsic connection between faith and the human intellectual enterprise by appealing to Plato, who held, he says, that "to love wisdom is to love God" (cf. De Civitate Dei, VIII, 8). The Christian commitment to learning, which gave birth to the medieval universities, was based upon this conviction that the one God, as the source of all truth and goodness, is likewise the source of the intellect’s passionate desire to know and the will’s yearning for fulfilment in love.

Only in this light can we appreciate the distinctive contribution of Catholic education, which engages in a "diakonia of truth" inspired by an intellectual charity which knows that leading others to the truth is ultimately an act of love (cf. Address to Catholic Educators, Washington, 17 April 2008). Faith’s recognition of the essential unity of all knowledge provides a bulwark against the alienation and fragmentation which occurs when the use of reason is detached from the pursuit of truth and virtue; in this sense, Catholic institutions have a specific role to play in helping to overcome the crisis of universities today. Firmly grounded in this vision of the intrinsic interplay of faith, reason and the pursuit of human excellence, every Christian intellectual and all the Church’s educational institutions must be convinced, and desirous of convincing others, that no aspect of reality remains alien to, or untouched by, the mystery of the redemption and the Risen Lord’s dominion over all creation.

During my Pastoral Visit to the United States, I spoke of the need for the Church in America to cultivate "a mindset, an intellectual culture which is genuinely Catholic" (cf. Homily at Nationals Stadium, Washington, 17 April 2008). Taking up this task certainly involves a renewal of apologetics and an emphasis on Catholic distinctiveness; ultimately however it must be aimed at proclaiming the liberating truth of Christ and stimulating greater dialogue and cooperation in building a society ever more solidly grounded in an authentic humanism inspired by the Gospel and faithful to the highest values of America’s civic and cultural heritage. At the present moment of your nation’s history, this is the challenge and opportunity awaiting the entire Catholic community, and it is one which the Church’s educational institutions should be the first to acknowledge and embrace.

5 comments:

Gratias said...

The Pope advises, but Cardinal Wuerl allows Sec. Kathleen Sebelius to bring her deathly ObamaCare to Georgetown University.

At least we have Thomas Aquinas College, and a few others, which do teach our Catholic Faith.

Hugh said...

In perfect agreement with Pope Benedict XVI on this particular issue. It is not only in USA however, but everywhere. The ignorance of The Faith by Catholics is absolutely shocking. many seem to be almost protestant in belief: for example, knowledge about The Sacraments is skeletal. many doubt the use of Confirmation and many priests neglect Confession. The loss of catholicism in Catholic schools has not helped this at all.

Supertradmum said...

The sad part of all this is twofold. One, some priests do not want catechesis and two, some laity do not want catechesis.

I have volunteered for over a year in three parishes to do catechesis for free, with a degree and much experience. I am orthodox, very. No one wants me. My pastor told me his adult education class could not get started up as the parishioners told him that they did not need to learn anything. another priest started a class and ended it when only one person showed up. Other priests do not want to rock the boat and actually fear their congregations.

There are many Catholics who are heretics. There are many Catholics who cannot pursue the life of virtue or perfection, because they do not believe in some of the basic teachings of the Catholic Church. I meet with this daily. I try to do what I can in a very small arena. I blog. I talk. However, until a certain generation of priests retires, us orthodox teachers do not have a chance of teaching in most parishes. And, until the contracepting generation of Catholics stop holding control over parishes, I am not used as I could be.

Alan Aversa said...

And Card. Burke is leading the solution: The Marian Catechist Apostolate

Bill G. said...

The best way to kill the faith of the flock is to not teach the flock about their faith.

Same holds true for the US Constitution and self sufficiency.