Rorate Caeli

Traditional Catholic soccer professional gets serious

It is a rare thing to read about a major league sports figure who talks openly about Catholicism in a positive light.  New York Yankees first baseman Mark Teixeira did so a couple months ago in the National Catholic Register.

Even more enjoyable is to see a major league sports figure talk openly about the traditional Latin Mass in a positive light.  In the same publication, Eddie Gaven, who played this week in the Major League Soccer all-star game, said the following:


I grew up with the Novus Ordo Mass, unaware of the Latin Mass. However, when I started looking into the faith more seriously, I came across the Latin Mass, which was quite an experience to see for the first time. It was beyond anything I’d ever dreamed of. There’s so much reverence in the Latin Mass, which I attend regularly now.

I’m very thankful to Pope Benedict for making the “extraordinary form” more widely available through his motu proprio five years ago. I enjoy sharing the Latin Mass with others and often invite teammates to attend with me. It truly is, as many have said before, the most beautiful thing outside of heaven.


The full article/interview may be read here.

22 comments:

Barbara said...

Great testimony! And I'm sure there are many others similar that we don't get to hear about! Good for him and Holy Church.....which I think will ONLY be restored with true Catholic Identity through "the most beautiful thing outside of heaven" and all that goes along with it!

No longer silent... said...

I am happy for this young man. He is obviously responding to grace. Hopefully, attending the Latin Mass will lead him to fighting for the Faith. That at least has been my own experience. There is more to being a faithful Catholic than just attending the Traditional Mass. By our Confirmation we have been made Catholic soldiers. That means speaking up against the false things being put forth as Catholic. Like Blessed Titus Brandsman...we must not be mute.

"O Timothy, keep that which is committed to thy trust, avoiding the profane novelties of words, and oppositions of knowledge falsely so called."

Hopefully his story will convert some of the readers of the NCR.

Daniel said...

"I grew up with the Novus Ordo Mass, unaware of the Latin Mass. However, when I started looking into the faith more seriously, I came across the Latin Mass, which was quite an experience to see for the first time."

As I posted yesterday to a different thread, I have found that by and large, Catholics who did not grow up with the TLM have expressed the greatest interest in the TLM as they form the majority of TLM congregations.

Conversely, I have found that the majority of Catholics who had grown up with the TLM do not want anything to do with the TLM.

They don't want any part of Latin Masses in either form. They prefer vernacular Novus Ordo Masses over TLMs.

Their collective attitude toward the TLM is "been there, done that. We know better."

There are many older Catholics, priests, religious and laity, who insist that prior to Vatican II, the state of TLM litugy was appalling.

Rorate posted Bishop Robert Lynch's (St. Petersburg, Florida) memories of the awful state of TLM liturgy that he encountered decades ago.

He speaks for many older Catholics who prefer the Novus Ordo to the TLM.

On the other hand, soccer player Eddie Gaven speaks for many
"post-Vatican II" Catholics who prefer the TLM to the Novus Ordo.

I don't know what to make of the pro vs. con TLM divide that exists between older and younger Catholics.

NIANTIC said...

Whow!!!This is absolutely wonderful. Thanks for sharing this with us readers!

Jordanes551 said...

Their collective attitude toward the TLM is "been there, done that. We know better."

They've been there and done that, but they don't really know better. Many of them never had any real appreciation for what they had, for what has been lost.

There are many older Catholics, priests, religious and laity, who insist that prior to Vatican II, the state of TLM litugy was appalling.

The liturgy indeed was bad in many places. But it's far worse now.

Rorate posted Bishop Robert Lynch's (St. Petersburg, Florida) memories of the awful state of TLM liturgy that he encountered decades ago.

His memories are exaggerated and expressed tendentiously.

JMR said...

I grew up with the Latin mass. I fell away from the Church for a while in the late sixties and early seventies when the worst changes were being implemented and when I went back I found the Mass unrecognizable. My dislike of the New Mass was visceral and almost instinctive because at the time I had no understanding of the theology behind the changes.
Family members who had never missed their Sunday obligation and attended Latin Mass and then went onto the NO without interruption never seemed to have any problems with the N.O.which I found incomprehensible.However,their behaviour and values are no longer distinguishable as Catholic.
I find it interesting that two writers of the best books on the Latin Mass, Mosebach and Biersach are more or less the same age as me and had a similar history to mine in that when the worst of the changes were being implemented they were no longer attending Mass.It was only when they returned that they were horrified by the NO.
As I had always been the most rebellious member of my family,they now regard with stupefied bemusement bemusement my adherence to Traditional Catholicism. I,on the other hand am bewildered and upset at the fact that they cannot or refuse to see the damage to the Church that has been wrought by the New Mass and Vatican II

Patrick Langan said...

The feelings expressed are great to see recounted and exactly the same as myself. I am nearly 62 years of age and was an alter server as were many of my peers. The Latin Mass has always been very special to me however for most of my adult live I have attended with my family the Novus Ordo Mass which I have always felt lacking in all things Catholic. Thanks to The FSSP I can now regularlyy attend the Latin Mass and I have also attended prior to this and now, when I cannot find an FSSP chapel, Mass held by the Society of St Pius X which has been a blessing.

GMMF said...

Daniel,

I have found the same thing perplexing. I guess in some ways, those of us who can attend a TLM are spoiled, since the only priests who tend to offer it do so because they love it dearly. They offer it with the utmost devotion, reverence, rubrical precision, etc. Historically, that has not been the case (far, far from it in certain eras).

Something must have been wrong immediately preceding the Council since almost every bishop at Vatican II thought some sort of reform was necessary--even Archbishop Levebvre according to his Open Letter.

There's an alleged quote of Archbishop Bugnini tossed around where he supposedly said the liturgical reformers will have won if the new Ordo Missae can outlast those who knew the TLM. In an ironic twist, I think it will be much, much easier than it is now to re-introduce and spread the TLM once the generation that remembers it as the ordinary form of Mass has passed away.

dcs said...

Perhaps the traditional Latin Mass will draw him away from his soccer heresy. ;-)

dominic1955 said...

It probably didn't help that the innovator priests and bishops jammed the propaganda of everything pre-Vatican II as bad and deficient down the throats of the Faithful back then. I'm not surprised many "hate" the Latin Mass.

However, that isn't all of them. In our parish, there are a number of folks who would have remembered the "bad old days". That, and I've heard from others of that age group that they wished they had the old ways back.

Simeon Grimes said...

Meanwhile in Ireland we have our first "iPriest"

http://www.irishexaminer.com/ireland/tech-savvy-priest-reads-tablet-to-celebrate-imass-202155.html

"I tend to move around the congregation when giving a sermon so it much easier to have it all on the iPad rather than on sheets of paper, and to be honest, it has got a great reaction from the mass goers. "

Sunshine State said...

I relate to these comments. My parents, although very devout, were both in their twenties during the 1960's, and show no interest in attending the Tridentine Mass. My dad attended Catholic School, and my mom attended Sunday Catechism Class. They tell me that they did not understand what was being said, which does not make sense to me as it is very easy to follow along in the missal. I wonder if the catechesis involving the liturgy and meaning of the mass were not communicated properly during the 40's and 50's when they attended parochial school and catechism? Any thoughts?

Long-Skirts said...

Dominic 1955 said:

" I'm not surprised many "hate" the Latin Mass."

They don't just "hate" the Latin Mass - they HATE the WHOLE Roman Catholic Faith!

JMR said...

I was very well catechised in the 50's in a local Catholic primary school. It was the Catechism that made me reject the NO Mass and Communion in the hand.We were far better catechised than children are now.
My Catechism gave me a basic wisdom which has served me well during my life.I always understood what false gods were such as socialism and never put my faith in them. I have always tried to avoid materialism and I have never been tempted by the various passing fads of my generation such as feminism.
Most of my contemporaries accepted the NO Mass but apart from carrying out their Sunday obligation they are no longer Catholic in any of their beliefs especially regarding homosexuals, divorce and contraception. I think that the No Mass made being catholic "easier 'somehow. It is the lazy option.

Steve said...

"I relate to these comments. My parents, although very devout, were both in their twenties during the 1960's, and show no interest in attending the Tridentine Mass. My dad attended Catholic School, and my mom attended Sunday Catechism Class. They tell me that they did not understand what was being said, which does not make sense to me as it is very easy to follow along in the missal."

I've heard that constantly from my parents, grandparents, aunts and uncles who remembered the TLM.

They all said they didn't understand what was being said. They were thrilled when the new Mass in English came along.

Frank said...

"Something must have been wrong immediately preceding the Council since almost every bishop at Vatican II thought some sort of reform was necessary--even Archbishop Levebvre according to his Open Letter."

In a 1998 speech, Cardinal Ratzinger painted a bleak picture of what the TLM was like at the time of Council.

He said so many Catholics were never in touch with the TLM and didn't care one bit when it left the scene.

Popes Paul VI, John Paul II and Benedict XVI all rejoiced at how the liturgical reform enriched the Church.

Here's what Pope Benedict XVI said in 1998 when he was Cardinal.

"On the other hand one has to admit that the celebration of the ancient liturgy was too lost in the realm of the individual and the private.

"One must admit that the communion between the priest and the faithful was lacking. I have great respect for our ancestors who during the Low Mass, said the prayers "during Mass" which their prayer book recommended.

"Certainly one cannot consider that as the ideal of the liturgical celebration!

"Perhaps, these reduced forms of celebration are the fundamental reason why the disappearance of the ancient liturgical books had no importance in many countries and caused no pain.

"There was never any contact with the liturgy itself."

That's why Catholics who are old enough to remember the TLM are very happy that the Mass was reformed.

New Catholic said...

Most Catholics who are alive and old enough to remember the TLM simply don't go to Mass regularly anymore, or are not Catholics altogether. The vast majority of them, all over the world. And they did go regularly before the reforms. So there you have it.

Naturally, those who stayed, and, when regular assistants, became the "Readers", the EMHC, the "pioneering" "empowered" laity, are so invested in the reform they just love it. But never forget: they were force-fed the reform by those who did all they could to extinguish the Traditional Mass. And they almost accomplished this.

New Catholic said...

Last commentator, I don't think you get it: those who do not like the Traditional Mass are not welcome here. Therefore, you are not welcome here. Go, and never return, please. Thank you.

NC

Tom said...

"Perhaps, these reduced forms of celebration are the fundamental reason why the disappearance of the ancient liturgical books had no importance in many countries and caused no pain."

There wasn't any pain when the Traditional Roman Mass disappeared?

The Faithful were never any contact with the liturgy itself?

Then why did tens of millions of Catholics cease to go to Mass when robbed of their beloved Traditional Roman Mass?

Tom

Joseph said...

Can you please post the upcoming traditional Dominican Rite Mass in Columbus?

http://dominican-liturgy.blogspot.com/2012/07/dominican-rite-masses-in-near-future.html

Jordanes551 said...

I grew up with the Latin mass. I fell away from the Church for a while in the late sixties and early seventies when the worst changes were being implemented and when I went back I found the Mass unrecognizable.

I've encountered Catholics like you -- for whom the reform Mass had the same effect. One man in my parish simply stopped going to Mass when the traditional Latin Mass ended, and for decades he vowed never to come back to Church until the old Mass returned. His wife eventually convinced him to start coming to Mass again a few years ago, but even so I don't believe he's a regular Mass-goer -- after all this time, I think he's in the habit of not living his faith. The liturgical reform was such a stumblingblock that his faith suffered a mortal wound from it, or an all but mortal wound.

eric frankovitch said...

I'm concerned that someone that participates is a communist activity such as soccer is an adherent of the TLM. Some thing is not adding up. He should immediately cease any participation in soccer or stop attending the TLM.

Rad Trad