Rorate Caeli

Summer Book Suggestions - 2nd Post:
What book was important for your conversion or discovery of Tradition?

Many of those interested in or involved with Catholic Traditional rites, doctrine, and practices are converts - and many more are cradle Catholics who discovered Tradition. In both cases, texts have usually played a large role in the conversion or discovery of Tradition.

In the case of this particular convert, two books were foremost.
Fr. Alberto Colunga, O.P.

One, before any other, was discovered by accident, long ago. 

One day, while conducting research in a very large and very secular library, I came upon a different book. The strange thing was that it was a tome in a foreign language about a matter to which I had not given greater consideration: it was volume 6 of the 16-volume bilingual edition of the Summa prepared by the Biblioteca de Autores Cristianos (BAC) in the 1950s. The texts that attracted me and which I could not stop reading were the introductions to the Treaty on the Law (I-II, q. 90-97), and the introductions to each question, all written by Fr. Carlos Soria, O.P.; and the introductions to the text and questions to the Treaty on the Ancient Law (I-II, q. 99-108), all written by Fr. Alberto Colunga, O.P. (Colunga, by the way, would be a name that would appear again when discovering the Vulgate, in the famous Colunga-Turrado edition, also published by BAC and the base text of the Clementine Vulgate to which we have linked since the early days of the blog.) I was fascinated by their description of a moral order that seemed to make perfect sense, and presented a whole version of the moral order superior to anything ever proposed by Protestantism. Colunga's introductions also showed how biblical Catholicism could be, which can be quite a surprise for a Protestant raised to believe the opposite. There are few things more beautiful than Order and no faith presents and teaches it like Catholicism 

The second one was... Dom Gaspar Lefebvre's "St. Andrew Daily Missal". It still is my favorite hand missal simply because it was the book that introduced me to the Traditional Latin Mass, even before I had ever been to one.

So, what were the books that first made you consider conversion or, if you already were a Catholic, made you see Traditional rites, practices, customs in a new light? Please,  feel free to suggest books in any language and from any time period.

81 comments:

Fr Michael Brown said...

The Restoration of Christian Culture by John Senior. Read it at one sitting in 1984.

jprichard said...

Marie-Joseph Nicolas op
La Co-redemption
Revue Thomiste 1947

A wonderfully limpid Thomist exposition of how Our Lord saves us with His Sacred Humanity - and the implications for Marian theology, as the title of the article suggests.

Allison said...

While the Eyes of the Great are Elsewhere by William L. Biersach http://www.amazon.com/books/dp/0971278652

newguy40 said...

From this newbie...

Attending my first Latin Mass led to me reading...

1.) 1962 Roman Missal

2.) This is the Mass. AB Sheen.

Wow...

culbreath said...

Cardinal Newman's "Apologia Pro Vita Sua" and "Conscience, Consensus and the Development of Doctrine".

Also Chesterton's "Orthodoxy", and a compilation of the famous "Radio Replies" broadcasts.

John said...

It wasn't a book; it was Walter Matt's Remnant in its 8½ x 11 newsletter incarnation, especially the articles by Owen Roberts (Michael Davies nom de plume in the early days). I always loved the old Mass. I was upset when it was changed and devastated when it was abolished. I found the Remnant and learned I wasn't alone and tradition wasn't just an emotional attachment. We had something reasonable and cogent to say for ourselves.

thetimman said...

The Holy Mass by Dom Gueranger (which is really a version of his sections on the ordinary of Mass in The Liturgical Year).

The Ottaviani Intervention.

Judith's Marriage. A bit didactic but a devastating critique.

Lord of the World, by Benson. The Mass as the ultimate lifeline for a world gone insane.

Finally, strangely, Canticle for Leibowitz. It provided a tangible example of how a non-Vatican II Church could handle the future. Aggiornamiento my foot.

Sarah said...

St. Louis de Montfort's _The Secret of the Rosary_ led me to pray my first rosary, after which I just knew I belonged in the Catholic Church. I was nervous, at first, about telling my parents, but after I did, they went to Confession for the first time since we left the Church (I was very young at the time) and started going to Mass again before I even received my First Communion and Confirmation.

Osusanna said...

Someone gave me an old Maryknoll daily missal when I returned to the Latin Mass. (I think I grew up with the St. Andrew.) I was enraptured, and appalled, at all the beautiful prayers that had been "left behind". That was the beginning...

Brother Juniper said...

For me it wasn't a book. It was Rorate Caeli.

Dr. Timothy J. Williams said...

After suffering through four years at a Christian Brothers High School, I was an agnostic. Then, I picked up two books (at random) from my father's library: Malcolm Muggeridge "Jesus Rediscovered", followed by Cardinal Gibbons "Faith of Our Fathers." Then, I lived in France for two years and discovered the remnant clinging to the Latin Mass... with joy at what I had discovered, and grief at what we had thrown away.

A Busy UK Rook said...

Pope John's Council by Michael Davies

Chateaubriand said...

Biblia Sacra Vulgata also Colunga Torrado edition. I give like present to some friends.

Fr. Steven said...

The pamphlets of Michael Davies

Mary Kay said...

Michael Davies opened my eyes (as a very conservative/trad Catholic) to what 'the older folk' were talking about. It finally made me laugh at my university-acquired liberalism; but first it shocked me to realize I was part of the problem.
Deo gratias for Mr. Davies' great trilogy, and later works. These readings very literally changed the course of my life.

Kevin Tierney said...

Calvet's Tomorrow Christendom, but also an older work most wouldn't cite: St. Athanasius On the Incarnation of the Word. Showed the importance of the Incarnation to the Faith, and how the things of this world are used to the glory of God. Sure, others talk about that stuff nowadays, but I've only found it within traditionalism that the rammifications of that viewpoint are taken seriously.

J. said...

The Creed from the Council of Trent.

Ensayo sobre el Catolicismo, el Liberalismo, y el Socialismo by Juan Donoso Cortes.

Letter to Cardinal Fornari on the Errors of Our Times, by Juan Donoso Cortes.

ea35c738-be15-11e2-9c0f-000bcdcb2996 said...

Twelve years of post Vatican II "Catholic" education, for which my parents struggled and sacrificed, produced in me a faithless imbecile living the life glorified by the worthless popular culture, not knowing that all I was doing was waiting around to be thrown into the fire.

I knew nothing of Tradition, of my Lord's Church, or the faith into which I was born.

I reverted in my late 30's and began going to the local N.O. parish because, even after 12 years in parochial schools, I never knew anything else existed. The church hid the Mass of All Ages from people of my generation.

My reversion was coming to a grinding halt as I could not take the sappy, irreverent masses I had to endure. I kept thinking back then, "is this it?"

I happened to be reading an article about, of all people, Mel Gibson. Don't know where or why. It mentioned something called the "Latin Mass." I had never heard of it. I even thought that it sounded like it might be taboo. Taboo! That's what I actually thought. And I was an honor student in the post-conciliar Catholic school system.

The mass I was going to was destroying my fledgling, reverted faith and this reference to some Latin Mass was a draw to me because I wasn't completely ready to give up.

After much research, some false starts, and finally a bit of a lengthy Sunday morning drive, I found myself where I belong; at the "Latin Mass." I will never forget that first Mass.

It was not a book but the Liturgy formed not by a modernist committee but by the Holy Ghost led me to the Divine beauty of Catholic Tradition.

People my age and younger were robbed.

My daughter, however, was raised on the Tridentine Mass and Tradition. She is now 22. She hasn't wasted any time pursing what the secular world says you should pursue as I did when I was her age. She recently completed her studies in Catechesis and Theology and is now pursing a Masters in Education Administration so that she can teach in and eventually run a Catholic school, and nourish young souls in timeless Catholic orthodoxy.

That is the work of the Holy Ghost. He did His work in forming my daughter through the true Mass, first and foremost.

brian fackler said...

The Reform of the Liturgy (1948-1975) by Annibale Bugnini

Peccator said...

The Spirit of the Liturgy, Joseph Ratzinger

The Reform of the Roman Liturgy: Its Problems and Background, Klaus Gamber

After Writing: On the Liturgical Consummation of Philosophy, Catherine Pickstock

The Organic Development of the Liturgy, Alcuin Reid

and of course Rorate Caeli!

Giovanni A. Cattaneo said...

The spirit of the liturgy by Cardinal Ratzinger

7ddd379a-f026-11e2-99fc-000bcdcb2996 said...

THEOLOGY AND SANITY by F.J. Sheed

BELIEF IN THE DIVINITY OF JESUS CHRIST by Fr. Didon

These were important in my conversion from Atheism.

Louis

Edward More said...

For me, it started by reading a book on Our Lady of Fatima (can't remember the title)... From there, "The Fatima Crusader". Until that time I didn't even know there was such a thing as Catholic tradition, the Tridentine mass, etc.

Virtudes said...

The Practice of Perfection and Christian Virtues, by Fr. Alphonsus Rodriguez, S.J., translated directly into English from the original Spanish by Fr. Joseph Rickaby of the same Society.

The British printing in the 1920s combined the complete three volumes into a two volume set. You can read it online and/or download it in full: Volume I, Volume II.

Alan Aversa said...

Abp. Lefebvre's Open Letter to Confused Catholics and Romano Amerio's Iota Unum

MarvinDante33 said...

What Went Wrong With Vatican II by Ralph McInerny. He made some excellent points--and then pulled his punch at the end. I was so puzzled by this that I had to learn more.

Alan Aversa said...

Yes, the St. Andrew's Missal is very good. Deo gratias that FSSP Publishing has it reprinted.

Gratias said...

One day I received a compilmentary copy of "The Latin Mass" magazine. I subscribed and then found a Diocesan Latin Mass in Ventura, 90 min from home in West LA.

The magazine arrived a couple of weeks after I thanked our music director at our still awful Vatican II parish for singing a beautiful hymn in Latin. So I think he must have given my name.

Whichever way this miraculous appearance in the mail originated, it changed my life.

If you have friends that might be on the fence, buy then a subscription to the Latin Mass Magazine. They need all the subscribers they can get because times are tough for Catholic publications.

This happened in 2004. I only found Rorate Caeli after Summorum Pontificum, when you had an amazing signature request jointly with Messa in Latino to influence the outcome of Universae Ecclesiae.

Gratias said...

New Catholic, like you I have spent many hours in research libraries. It is amazing what one picked up by just roaming around the book stacks. Very glad your conversion worked so well for us your readers.

Gratias said...

My Catholic education continued by purchasing many of the books recommended over the years by Rorate readers, such as those by Michael Davies, Malachi Martin, Diane Moczar and Gironela. To my fellow readers I would say: follow attentively the recommendations that appear in these pages we are so privileged to have.

Zdravko Ćurić said...

It was the Letter from Cardinals Ottaviani and Bacci to His Holiness Pope Paul VI - the famous Ottaviani Intervention.

Angelo said...

My eyes were opened to Tradition when I was 15 Years old, am now 54. All the books I read were from Tan Book Publishing. At 17 I joined the Charismatic Movement and was assured that all I had come to believe was outdated and discarded by Vatican Council ll. At age 19 we had a change of priests. This priest was a great Theologian and instructed me to "get out of the Charismatic Movement". So when confronted with liberalism I was well armed and defended the Church. I owe it all to Tan Books and to this Holy Priest.

Miles said...

- "Open Letter to Confused Catholics", Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre;

- "Charitable Anathema", Dietrich von Hildebrand;

- "The Catholic Mass", Martin von Cochem.

Angelo said...

I just looked at the SSPX website. The SSPX directs one to a Video by His Excellency Bishop Athanasius Scheider who is a Bishop considered in good standing in the Church. The Bishop speaks on how Vatican ll must be corrected. The Council did in fact use ambiguous language. He cites examples of passages that must be reinterpreted correctly. He stated that even Cardinal Casper said that Vatican ll must be reinterpreted correctly. The SSPX rightly calls this a vindication of their stand on the Council. It is Bishops such as this one that confirms me in my Traditional Catholic faith.

Mark of the Vineyard said...

Books that helped bring about my reversion:

- Dostoevsky's novels
- Fear and Trembling, Kierkeegard

Lynne said...

I second Alison's recommendation of William Biersach's book, While the Eyes of the Great are Elsewhere. It is truly amazing. I discovered that not only did the new churchmen create a new Mass, they also hid Mary. Read the book!

Frank Carleton said...

Amongst so many: The Ottaviani intervention, unanswered to this day by the protagonists of the desacralizing liturgical revolution dubbed "reform" just as the 16th century Protestant revolt against the Church was misnamed the Reformation AND The Decomp[osition of Catholicism by Fr. Louis Bouyer, a disappointed progressist but a morally and intellectually honest man

PHILOTHEA said...

Michael Davies changed my life. The first book I read was Apologia Pro Marcel Lefebvre. The book itself was more a collection of important documents from Rome, Sermons, Condemnations and history of the 'Lefebvre Affair' with a commentary by Michael Davies. Brilliant.

Which I promptly followed up with his 'Liturgical Revolution Trilogy'. After reading those books and following it up with 'Rhine Flows into the Tiber' among others.

No going back now, I know to much.

Dan Hunter said...

"The Devastated Vineyard" by Dietrich Von Hildebrand.

George said...

These sermons:

http://www.audiosancto.org/

poeta said...

I was already a traditional Catholic when I read it, but How Christ Said the First Mass by Fr. Meagher helped me see Traditional rites and practices in a new light by explaining just how ancient they are.

John R said...

I was brought to Tradition at the age of 10 by my father's rediscovery of it which had been prompted by the SSPV's one-time TV show in the late '80's/early 90's (on the BET network of all places!) called "What Catholics Believe".

Books which have firmed up my growing in Traditions are:
1. "Pope Paul's New Mass" by Michael Davies
2. "Open Letter to Confused Catholics" by Archbishop Lefebvre
3. "The Rhine Flows into the Tiber" by Fr. Wiltgren
4. Last but not least, several hand Missals and a deep discovery and appreciation for the Traditional Divine Office

Fr. Cekada's "Work of Human Hands" is next on my list to read, and I look forward to a deeper analysis on this matter than Davies' great work.

John R said...

Forgot to mention numerous Papal encyclicals which informed and continue to inform Traditional Catholic social doctrine, especially "Mirari Vos" by Greogry XVI, "Quanta Cura" by Pus IX, "Libertas" and "Rerum Novarum" by Leo XIII, "Lamentabile" by Pius X, "Quas Primas" by Pius XI, and "Humani Generis" by Pius XII.

JFM said...


The camel's nose in the tent was an article on Frank Sheed written by James McLucas and printed in LATIN MASS Magazine. I don't know how I got on the magazine's mailing list, but it was a Godsend. As is Rorate-Caeli.

"The Rhine Flows Into the Tiber" lets you know something is afoot.

"Commentary on the Documents of Vatican II," in 5 volumes, edited by Vorgrimler, unintentionally/exponentially amplifies your misgivings.
Especially with a backdrop of "The Church Confronts Modernity," by Thomas E. Woods Jr.

"Iota Unum," by Romano Amerio, hits with a sonic boom.





Gerard Brady said...

"Cranmer's Godly Order" by Michael Davies (my copy is signed by the Author - May he rest in Peace)and "Literary Converts" by Joseph Pearce. As I am re reading Romano Amerio's fantastic "Iota Unum" at the moment I can also recommend this volume for those who have not read it.

PHILOTHEA said...

John R,

I'm sure you must include Pascendi and the oath against modernism in your list.

Angelo said...

The Desolate City: Revolution in the Catholic Church

Anne Roche Muggeridge

J. said...

On conversion to the Faith: David Currie's Born Fundamentalist, Born Again Catholic. It's not a great book, but it did some basic, essential work in leveling the path out of Protestantism.

On conversion to Traditionalism: Dietrich von Hildebrand's The Devastated Vineyard. I had been considering traditional Catholicism for some time, but von Hildebrand's book pushed me over the edge. I figured if someone even John Paul II admired could publicly defend Traditionalism, it must be worthwhile. And of course it's just a fantastic book in general.

John R said...

Philothea (if you're male, your name should be "Philotheos", but I digress)...indeed, I meant Pascendi/Lamentabile and the Oath.

Bill said...

I didn't need any book to convert me to it. Liturgical abuse and heterodoxy did the trick. But I love "The Great Facade" by Ferrara and Woods and Archbishop Lefebvre's book "They Have Uncrowned Him." As much as those books helped me reject the conciliar and post-conciliar novelties, the most helpful book of all was TAN's edition of the "Ottaviani Intervention." Since TAN discontinued it, the translator, Fr. Anthony Cekada, published another edition of it. From my perspective, anyone who thinks the Novus Ordo is a good thing needs to read that book.

luceroct said...

Open Letter to Confused Catholics and They Have Uncrowned Him; both by Abp. Lefevbre.

Woody said...

"They Have Uncrowned Him" and "Against the Heresies" both by Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre. The latter book is basically the old "Acts of the Magisterium" course he taught at Econe.

Gratias said...

The Cypresses Believe in God - Jose Maria Gironella

The Jesuits: the Society of Jesus and the betrayal of the Roman Catholic Church - Malachi Martin

In the Beginning... A Catholic Understanding of the story of Creation and the Fall - Joseph Ratzinger

poetcomic1 said...

Chesterton. A convert from Judaism, I went to find the church that Chesterton gloried in and IT WASN'T THERE ANYMORE. It just about broke my heart. I have reconciled myself to the Mass of the Ages being an 'odd offshoot' of Catholicism and will never get over the feeling of being 'tolerated but just barely'.

backtothefuture said...

Michael Davies "Pope Paul's new mass", but Davies writings in general.

Jeanne Holler said...

Great comments....
I "stumbled" across this beautiful Cathedral Church ....it said Saint Francis de Sales Oratory .
I searched and found their web site..said they had the Latim Mass...what the Latin Mass I thought that was gone forever .
I attended , it was life changing .
THEN I started reading everything I could on Vatican II and what happened ...Michael Davies all his great articles , America Needs Fatima, The Remnant , Catholic Family News and so much more !
I am now faithful to the Traditional Latim Mass , The Mass, where heaven and earth meet and we have that little glimpse of heaven and the supernatural!

Barbara said...

The books that led to my conversion to Catholicism were the Seven Story Mountain and No Man is an Island by Thomas Merton coupled with the The Imitation of Christ and Orthodoxy by Chesterton. There were others during that period too as I was reading everything I could get my hands on pertaining to Catholicism - but these stand out.

My discovery of Tradition - I have to thank Father Timothy Finigan of the Hermeneutic Of Continuity Blog when I JUST "happened" on his blog the week of 7th of July 2007 and viewed his wonderful video! Wow! I still remember how the scales fell from my eyes with that little film! I was going through a particularly difficult time trying to reconcile the parish reality that I found myself in and all the the books on the lives of the saints that I was reading. There were other confusing factors as I have always had a strong sense of Catholic Magisterium since my conversion - from reading encyclicals Llike Evangelium Vitae and Humane Vitae.

Finding Father Finigans blog lead to the network of other Catholic Blogs and and many great discoveries.
I read the "Heresy of Formlessness" by Martin Mosebach and "Iota Unum" by Romano Amerio (which for me at that time read as a thriller - and have notes galore everywhere on it).
I remember feeling somewhat angy and duped by unknown forces( at that time I didn't want to name the guilty aloud).
I have read a lot since then and Rorate Caeli has played an enormous part in solidifying my Catholic Identiy which can only be found in my view, with the adherence to true Catholic Tradition.

As PHILOTEA said - there is no going back now _ I know too much.

Dear Father Finigan and all great Catholic Priests on the net that are now familiar to me - I thank you from the bottom of my heart and each one of you are written on my prayer list that I take with me to Adoration.

All of this has helped me live my Catholic life each day with great joy and certainty despite the present storms that rock the amazing Barque of Peter which I love with all my heart and will till my dying day.

Dr. Mabuse said...

Angelo beat me to it: I too read 'The Desolate City', even before I'd converted to Catholicism, and I knew that she was right. I was seeing the modernist heresy play out on a smaller stage in the Anglican Church, but it was the same story.

mbg said...

mfg said The Baltimore Catechism, study of which began in 1936 in Sister Gemma's classroom in St. Joseph's School, Santa Ana, CA, and continued through 14 years of Catholic education. My current copy is April 6, 1885, James Gibbon, Archbishop of Baltimore. Still new and shining. Now my grandchildren are repeating the answers to me. They say they don't learn anything like this in (Catholic) school. They love memorizing. Now they sure know Who made them and Why He made them.

Caeremonarius said...

The Reform of the Roman Liturgy: Its Problems and Background by Mons. Klaus Gamber

Kathleen said...

I'm a cradle Catholic, born during the month that VII opened. I fell away from the Church upon reaching adulthood as there was nothing to hold me in the N.O. and wandered the dark woods until just after the start of the new millennium.

It wasn't a book that steered me towards traditionalism, more a combination of factors and Internet sources together with an extremely hard working guardian angel that guided me out of the dark woods into traditionalism – the N.O wouldn't have had anything to bring me back, just as it hadn't held me.

I have since been merrily working my way through big stacks of books though.

On this topic I look forward to my next book being:

The Second Vatican Council - an unwritten story, By Professor Roberto deMattei ( http://www.loretopubs.org/the-second-vatican-council.html ) thanks to the excellent related articles here at Rorate Caeli.

UnamSanctam said...

Years ago: Michael Davies' trilogy on the Nervous Ordeal; more recently, Iota Unum.

veneremurcernui said...

OK, mine may sound lame so don't laugh, but it was John Salza's Biblical Basis of the Catholic Faith and Biblical Basis for the Eucharist. Those two books really juxtaposed the extraordinary beauty of the Catholic Faith, and it's glorious cohesiveness, while also exposing the utter dreck I had experienced up until that point.

Even though he's nutty on a couple of issues (geocentrism), I will always be in Mr. Salza's debt, and I admire so much of his work. It was transformational for me.

Andrew Rivera said...

"A Brief Catechism for Adults" - its contrast with the goings-on at our local parish prompted a search to discover where the contradictions might lay.

John Ambs said...

13 yrs old -- Our Lady Speaks (Fatima)
15 yrs old -- Pre-VII Missal (WOW!)
15 yrs old -- Michael Davies trilogy (Apologia Pro Marcel LeFebvre, etc.)

49 yrs old -- Have three Traditional Catholic kids (including two altar boys), aged 15, 12, and 10.

John F. Ambs

onakiser said...

St. Francis of Sales' "Treatise on the Love of God" was part of what moved me to ask to be baptized. I read that before I even started reading the Bible. My dear old lay Carmelite catechist who taught me Latin prayers, Gregorian chant and made me join him in reading Vespers after each session was an influence in finding out about and falling in love with the Traditional Latin Mass.

Unknown said...

While the Eyes of the Great were Elsewhere.

JFM said...

"The gates of hell: The struggle for the Catholic Church"
ANNE ROCHE

I should have added this one, which may be the best book on Vatican II and its liturgical legacy I have read to date. Done in 75, before her much more celebrated DESOLATE CITY, this is for my money actually a far better book.

J-U-S-T T-E-R-R-I-F-I-C.

Someone needs to republish it.

Just another mad Catholic said...

From Atheism
"Catholicism for dummies" Fr Jay Finelli

"Case for Christ" & "Case for the real Jesus" - Lee Strobel (protestant)

The Holy Spirit

To Traditionalism

"Open Letter to Confused Catholics" - Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre

The Holy Spirit

Timothy Finigan said...

I was asked to celebrate a funeral in the traditional rite for a parishioner. I agreed and then had to learn the rite in two weeks! The late Michael Davies came to the Mass and afterwards gave me an instruction booklet and some altar cards. As I began saying private Masses the rite itself converted me rapidly and with great power.

Afterwards, a little devotional book for priests called "Clericus Devotus" (though it could have been any of hundreds that seminarians and priests used to use) taught me what was expected of priests spiritually, in accord with the reforms of the Council of Trent.

I thank God with all my heart for His divine and inscrutable providence.


(Barbara [19 July 16.54] for your kind words which leave me humbled and grateful to have been used by the good Lord.)

Timothy Finigan said...

I was asked to celebrate a funeral in the traditional rite for a parishioner. I agreed and then had to learn the rite in two weeks! The late Michael Davies came to the Mass and afterwards gave me an instruction booklet and some altar cards. As I began saying private Masses the rite itself converted me rapidly and with great power.

Afterwards, a little devotional book for priests called "Clericus Devotus" (though it could have been any of hundreds that seminarians and priests used to use) taught me what was expected of priests spiritually, in accord with the reforms of the Council of Trent.

I thank God with all my heart for His divine and inscrutable providence.


(Barbara [19 July 16.54] for your kind words which leave me humbled and grateful to have been used by the good Lord.)

Angelo said...

"Hidden Treasure by St. Leonard" This book taught me what is really going on at Mass. It confirms what a priest said about the Mass, it not being a human act but a Divine act. When attending a Novus Ordo I block out all the silliness and think of the truth of the Mass as taught by St. Leonard. I have a new source that encourages me in being a Traditionalist. And it is this thread on Rorate Caeli and the reasons all those who have commented have given for being true Catholics. It could only be the work of God the Holy Ghost, that we were all led in a very similar direction. Deo Gratias!

Andrew Markich said...

DEATH, JUDGMENT, HEAVEN, AND HELL:
MEDITATIONS ON THE FOUR LAST THINGS
BY
SAINT ALPHONSUS DE LIGUORI
DOCTOR OF THE CHURCH

Sue Sims said...

Similarly to the experience of Poetcomic 1 above, I was a convert from Judaism. For 28 years an evangelical Protestant, I came into the Church through reading Ronald Knox's The Belief of Catholics, but found that those beliefs were not actually believed by most of the Catholics around me. I came to the traditional rite via a dear friend who had hated the N.O. from the beginning: she couldn't drive, so I would take her to the occsasional indult Masses in our locality and was gradually drawn in.

Roman Catholic said...

Rome Sweet Home: Our Journey to Catholicism by Dr. Scott and Kimberly Hahn

Nicholas Ugap said...

Dignity and Duties of Priest by St.Alphonsus Liguori, when I'm 14 years old and at that time know almost nothing about Catholicism nor Tradition.

Bill Standley said...

Anything by Michael Davies, especially Cranmer's Godly Order" . . . and Latin Mass Magazine.

El Cid said...

"Father Elijah: An Apocalypse," by Michael O'Brien

"An Exorcist Tells His Story," by Fr. Gabriel Amorth

"City of God," by Saint Augustine of Hippo

"The Desert Fathers: Sayings of the Early Christian Monks"

"Faith and Reason," by Pope John Paul II

Jacob Biddle said...

THE most important book for my coversion to tradition was Padre Pio The Stigmatist by Fr. Charles Mortimer Carty

wolfy-pdx said...

The Holy Mass Worthily Celebrated - Rev. Father Chaignon S.J. 1897

The most beautiful teaching aid for priests and lay that I have ever read. This book not only taught me a greater way to participate in the Holy Mass but it has also strengthened my prayer life tremendously.

Roman Missal 1962 Baronius Press

The Catechism of The Council of Trent


Mitchell said...

Iota Unum.....Romano Amerio.