Rorate Caeli

For the record: Parolin new Secretary of State

As speculated for months, and confirmed by leaks for several days, the Apostolic Nuncio to Venezuela, Italian Archbishop Pietro Parolin, was named by Pope Francis new Secretary of State, effective October 15. Abp. Parolin is considered very close to Cardinal Angelo Sodano, former Secretary of State.

In a sign of English as a second language of communications of the Holy See with the world, all major announcements today were made available in English directly by the Holy See Press Office together with the Italian original.


The Holy Father has accepted, in keeping with Can. 354 of the Code of Canon Law, the resignation of His Eminence, Card. Tarcisio Bertone, Secretary of State, asking him, however, to remain in office until 15 October, 2013, with all the faculties proper to the office.

At the same time, the Holy Father has nominated Archbishop Pietro Parolin, Apostolic Nuncio to Venezuela, as the new Secretary of State. He shall take possession of his office on 15 October, 2013.

On that occasion, His Holiness shall receive in audience Superiors and Officials of the Secretariat of State, in order publically to thank Cardinal Bertone for his faithful and generous service to the Holy See, and to introduce them to the new Secretary of State. [Source]
___________________________

STATEMENT BY ARCHBISHOP PIETRO PAROLIN ON THE OCCASION OF HIS APPOINTMENT AS SECRETARY OF STATE [Source]

At this moment, in which my appointment as Secretary of State is made public, I desire to express deep and affectionate gratitude to the Holy Father, Francis, for the unmerited trust he is showing me, and to make known to him once again my willingness and complete availability to work with him and under his guidance for the greater glory of God, the good of the Holy Church, and the progress and peace of humanity, that humanity might find reasons to live and to hope.

I feel very strongly the grace of this call, which is yet another and the latest of God’s surprises in my life. Above all, I feel the full weight of the responsibility placed upon me: this call entrusts to me a difficult and challenging mission, before which my powers are weak and my abilities poor. For this reason, I entrust myself to the merciful love of the Lord, from whom nothing and no one can ever separate me, and to the prayers of all. I thank all those who have shown and who, starting now, will show me understanding, as well as for any and all manner of help that anyone might desire to offer me in my new undertaking.

My thoughts go to my family and to all the persons who have been part of my life: in the parishes into which I was born and in which I served; in the dear Diocese of Vicenza; at Rome; in the countries in which I have worked – from Nigeria, to Mexico, and most recently in Venezuela, which I am sorry to leave. I think also of Pope-emeritus Benedict XVI, who ordained me bishop, I think of the Secretariat of State, which was my home for many years, of His Eminence, Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone, of the other Superiors, colleagues and collaborators and of the whole Roman Curia, as well as of all those who represent the Holy Father and the Holy See diplomatically around the world. I owe a great debt to them all.

It is with trepidation that I place myself in this new service to the Gospel, to the Church and to Pope Francis, but also with trust and serenity – disposed – as the Holy Father has asked us from the beginning – to walk, to build and to profess.

May our Lady, whom I like to invoke under her titles as Our Lady of Monte Berico, Guadalupe and Coromoto, give us, "The courage, to walk in the presence of the Lord, with the Lord’s Cross; to build the Church on the Lord’s blood which was poured out on the Cross; and to profess the one glory: Christ crucified. And in this way, the Church will go forward." And, as they say in Venezuela, "¡Que Dios les bendiga!". [May God bless you!"]

Caracas, 31 agosto 2013

22 comments:

poeta said...

Does this spell the stillbirth of the Curial reform?

David Werling said...

This appointment demonstrates who has been the real Vatican ruler for the last couple of decades... ever since 1994, and perhaps longer than that.

Dan Hunter said...

David,

Whom?

RipK said...

This this a good appointment for Tradition? does anyone know?

Jon said...

That would be Angelo Cardinal Sodano.

And Benedict resigned for this.

Robbie said...

After nearly six months of inaction, does anyone really still think the faction who voted in Bergoglio was concerned with Curial reform? Bergoglio spoke of reform in the meetings leading up to the Conclave, but it was in generalities. The best evidence he had no real plan was the committee he established to look into the issue. Committees are where plans and ideas go to die.

Bergoglio was voted in by the modernists so they could chip away at the supposedly conservative pontificates of JPII and B16. Whether or not he'll be able to be more Paul VI than Paul VI, we don't know. But it does seem clear many of the more "conservative" Cardinals who went along with the vote didn't expect the inaction Bergoglio has shown on reform. Even Dolan has said so.

Joseph Franceski said...

I am not sure I understand the thread of these comments. Is this new man an "insider" and therefore simply more of the same? His years of service outside of Rome and his relative youth would seem to indicate he is something of a change from what we have been getting, but I admit I am not versed on these types of appointments.

Gratias said...

++Parolin will be able to speak in Spanish to Pope Francis.

UnamSanctam said...

Can SOMEONE tell me:

What's with all this "walking" going on in the post-Vatican II Church? Apart from Tradition, what are they trying to shed? Some weight?

7fbc6254-eb65-11e2-85d7-000bcdcb471e said...

Unam Sanctam asked, Can SOMEONE tell me, what's with all this "walking" going on in the post-Vatican II Church? Apart from Tradition, what are they trying to shed? Some weight?

It's the divesting of any and all vestiges of the Institutional Church. I think so anyway.

Matt

Hermit Crab said...

The reference to "walking" comes from Francis's first homily, Sistine Chapel, March 14th. Quote:

"In these readings, I see that there is something in common: it is movement. In the first reading, movement is the journey itself. In the second reading, movement is the up-building of the Church. In the third reading, in the Gospel, the movement is in the act of profession. Walking, building, professing.

"Walking. The House of Jacob. 'O house of Jacob! Come, let us walk in the light of the Lord.' This is the first thing God said to Abraham: 'Walk in my presence and be blameless.' Walking. Our life is a journey and when we stop, there is something wrong. Walking always, in the presence of the Lord, in the light of the Lord, seeking to live with that blamelessness, which God asks of Abraham, in his promise."

Quite difficult to understand exactly what he means.

Rev. Anthony Cekada said...

One of the accounts of his background contained the following intriguing nugget: Parolin's doctoral thesis at the Gregorian was on the synod of bishops.

Francis has mentioned "synodality" several times already as a way of implementing V2's notion of collegiality.

Abp. Parolin is just the man for the job.

This agenda, I think, foreshadows devolved legislative authority and a real circus of conflict and "diversity."

Robbie said...

Fr. Cekada mentioned the prospects of synodality a few months back and it appears this may be Francis' ultimate goal. Given his decision to create a committee for Curial reform, it suggests he believes the Bishops should have a large voice in every move the Church makes. In other words, he wants to devolve power away from the papacy and deliver it to world's Bishops. This was something that was too bold even for the 1960's and 1970's, but maybe not today.

LeonG said...

Personally, it looks distinctly like a continuation of the status quo ante bellum.

yoink! said...

Inaction? It has only been a few months...I hope that he takes the appropriate amount of time to perform the diligence necessary to truly reform the Curia. How silly it is to think it could be done quickly, like the flick of a light switch ...

Can you provide a reference to where Dolan commented on the Pope's inaction?

Robbie said...

As best as I can remember, Dolan spoke about the Pope's reform moves in an interview with John Allen around the time of WYD.

Brian said...

The Dolan comment is here: http://ncronline.org/blogs/ncr-today/dolan-francis-and-isnt-what-we-expected

It's a more measured criticsim than it often sounds like when paraphrased. First, Dolan praises the Pope highly for "simplicity, sincerity, humility, [and] that ability to speak from the heart," and for being "somebody with the mind of Benedict and the heart of John Paul," and also for being "the world's parish priest."

And then he says that it "hasn't been as obvious yet" that the Pope has "good leadership and management skill," but that this is probably "part of a strategy" of setting the right tone first and then pursuing more concrete reforms.

Edward said...

One blog said he was a protegee of Cardinal Casaroli, enough said

Brian said...

"Edward said...
One blog said he was a protegee of Cardinal Casaroli, enough said..."

The thing is, if anyone has had Vatican diplomatic experience and is, well, alive, he's worked for and (if he's gotten ahead in his career enough to even be considered for SegState) probably been mentored or at least promoted by, Cardinal(s) Casaroli, Sodano and/or Bertone. So, if you disqualify everyone associated with those three (and probably even if you only disqualify those associated with the first two), you disqualify anyone who is actually qualified to be in charge of the nuncios. And that means you get someone like Bertone, who was in over his head.

The choice of Parolin, whose primary experience is as a diplomat, suggests that the committee of cardinals proposes and the Pope may be leaning towards a model in which the secretary of state would not even be the one in charge of implementing curial reform; that may be the person in the new "moderator of the curia" position or in an old position with a beefed-up role. Greg Burke made this seem more likely today by emphasizing the Secretary of State's diplomatic role. So, there may not have been a need for a Secretary of State who would have come with obvious zeal to shake up the curia; that will be the job of another official.

yoink! said...

Thanks for the link to the NCR article... I just read it and must say that I do not see anything in that article that expresses dissatisfaction with how Francis has approached the first few months of his pontificate. I wouldn't even say it is measured criticism... Dolan simply says it is a matter of priorities and the changes may come after the summer lull. He even goes so far as to say that Francis has his priorities right.

You're very right in saying that the article is often misrepresented when paraphrased.

My we all espouse the virtue of assuming positive intent until proven otherwise.

yoink! said...

Thanks for the link to the NCR article... I just read it and must say that I do not see anything in that article that expresses dissatisfaction with how Francis has approached the first few months of his pontificate. I wouldn't even say it is measured criticism... Dolan simply says it is a matter of priorities and the changes may come after the summer lull. He even goes so far as to say that Francis has his priorities right.

You're very right in saying that the article is often misrepresented when paraphrased.

My we all espouse the virtue of assuming positive intent until proven otherwise.

Mitchell said...

Venezuela is the only country in Latin America to not have or have had a Tridentine Mass post SP...