Rorate Caeli

Veni Praecelsa Domina


Come, o Supreme Lady,
O Mary, do thou visit us,
enlighten our sickly souls
by the example of thy life.

Come, O Salvatrix of the world,
take away the filth of sin;
by visiting thy people,
remove their peril.

Come, O Queen of nations,
extinguish the flames of guilt,
rectify what is wrong,
give us to live innocently.

Come, and visit the sick,
O Mary, fortify the strong
with thy holy vigor,
so that the brave fail not.

Come, O thou Star, and Light of Seas,
shed thy ray of peace on us;
let the heart of John exult
with joy before the Lord.
Veni Praecelsa Domina
(an ancient Sequence for the Traditional Feast of the Visitation,
in honor of the Feast of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Queen)

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

Even as a fairly traditional Catholic, I have a problem with the ''salvatrix'' title when it does not coincide with the respectable notion of coredemption.

Jesus is the Savior, but Mary is the ''Mother of the Savior'', so the title should read ''Mater Salvatorris.

New Catholic said...

De Maria nunquam satis. NUNQUAM!

I should add that this sequence is usually translated in English by the substitution of the original "Salvatrix" for "Co-Redemptrix". The meaning is, of course, the same.

As St. Bernard said, "Intuere, O homo, consilium Dei, consilium pietatis: redempturus humanum genus, pretium universum contulit in Mariam".

"UNIVERSUM". She is thus rightly called "Salvatrix saeculi" in the sequence, present in so many ancient Western Missals.

NC

Anonymous said...

Present in so many ANCIENT Western Missals New Catholic? Hardly ancient. The mediaeval period does not qualify in the history of the Church as "ancient". And this sequence is certainly not typical of the more venerable sequences which have been preserved in the Roman Missal.

Jordanes said...

The mediaeval period does not qualify in the history of the Church as "ancient".

Thus saith Anonymous. You're referring to a period that began about 1,500 years ago and ended about 500 years ago. It certainly wasn't last night or last week.

And this sequence is certainly not typical of the more venerable sequences which have been preserved in the Roman Missal.

I suppose we'll have to take your word for it. In the meantime, this ancient sequence is beautiful and may not be attacked or impugned by anyone who dares call himself a Catholic.