Rorate Caeli

First Anglican Ordinariate erected

As expected, under the provisions of the Apostolic Constitution Anglicanorum coetibus, the Holy Father today erected the first Personal Ordinariate for Anglicans entering the Catholic Church, the Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham, under the patronage of Blessed John Henry Newman, with Father Keith Newton appointed as the ordinary. As a married priest, he will not be ordained a bishop.

Full note of the Holy See Press Office:

"In accordance with the provisions of the Apostolic Constitution 'Anglicanorum coetibus' of Pope Benedict XVI (4 November 2009) and after careful consultation with the Catholic Bishops Conference of England and Wales, the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith has today erected a Personal Ordinariate within the territory of England and Wales for those groups of Anglican clergy and faithful who have expressed their desire to enter into full visible communion with the Catholic Church", reads an English-language communique released today. "The Decree of Erection specifies that the Ordinariate will be known as the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham and will be placed under the patronage of Blessed John Henry Newman.
"A Personal Ordinariate is a canonical structure that provides for corporate reunion in such a way that allows former Anglicans to enter full communion with the Catholic Church while preserving elements of their distinctive Anglican patrimony. With this structure, the Apostolic Constitution 'Anglicanorum coetibus' seeks to balance on the one hand the concern to preserve the worthy Anglican liturgical, spiritual and pastoral traditions and, on the other hand, the concern that these groups and their clergy will be fully integrated into the Catholic Church.
"For doctrinal reasons the Church does not, in any circumstances, allow the ordination of married men as bishops. However, the Apostolic Constitution does provide, under certain conditions, for the ordination as Catholic priests of former Anglican married clergy. Today at Westminster Cathedral in London, Archbishop Vincent Nichols of Westminster, ordained to the Catholic priesthood three former Anglican bishops: Reverend Andrew Burnham, Reverend Keith Newton, and Reverend John Broadhurst.
"Also today Pope Benedict XVI has nominated Reverend Keith Newton as the first Ordinary of the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham. Together with Reverend Burnham and Reverend Broadhurst, Reverend Newton will oversee the catechetical preparation of the first groups of Anglicans in England and Wales who will be received into the Catholic Church together with their pastors at Easter, and will accompany the clergy preparing for ordination to the Catholic priesthood around Pentecost.
"The provision of this new structure is consistent with the commitment to ecumenical dialogue, which continues to be a priority for the Catholic Church. The initiative leading to the publication of the Apostolic Constitution and the erection of this Personal Ordinariate came from a number of different groups of Anglicans who have declared that they share the common Catholic faith as it is expressed in the Catechism of the Catholic Church and accept the Petrine ministry as something Christ willed for the Church. For them, the time has now come to express this implicit unity in the visible form of full communion".

37 comments:

Mitre said...

"A former Anglican Bishop who belongs to the Ordinariate and who has not been ordained as a bishop in the Catholic Church, may request permission from the Holy See to use the insignia of the episcopal office." -- Complementary norms 11§4

If I am reading this correctly, the use of pontificals by non-bishops is making a comeback. It was once granted to some grades of 'monsignor'.

Non-bishop cardinals, like Cardinal Bartolucci, can also wear pontificals. All cardinals were to be consecrated bishops, but they're not.

Looks like Bugnini's 'principle of authenticity' (if I remember his phrase correctly) is down the drain.

Cruise the Groove. said...

Wonderful news!

Maybe this will pave the way for full regularisation with the FSSPX very shortly.

Anonymous said...

"...in such a way that allows former Anglicans to enter full communion with the Catholic Church while preserving elements of their distinctive Anglican patrimony...."

Will some kind soul explain this to me? Does this mean you can be an Anglican and a Catholic at the same time? In other words, have your cake and eat it too?

Delphina

Mickey said...

If anybody is in favor of rebuilding the ruins of the Walsingham Priory destroyed by Henry the 8th, say AYE!

if not in favor Say Naye!

That the Personal Ordinariate would setup house there say AYE!

In not in favor Say Naye!

Anonymous said...

This is a great day. A 475 year breach has been healed, one between the Church and an Anglican culture much of which has always yearned for reconciliation with Eternal Rome and a return to its roots. Congratulations to Frs. John Broadhurst and Andrew Burnham and their families and especially to Fr. Keith Newton and his wife. And a warm welcome to all incoming Anglicans: we love you and your influence will help the Church in this day.

I have also heard that, finally!, the wheels are in motion for a Canadian Ordinaraite. Archbishop Collins of Toronto has called a first meeting of interested parties. It will be held in late March. Hooray!

P.K.T.P.

Anonymous said...

I have just received the SUPERLATIVE and amazing news that a number of former Anglicans were received in England today according to the PRE-CONCILIAR Rite of Reception and with a Traditional Latin Mass. This event took place at the very same time as the ordinations at Westminster but at a different venue. UNBELIEVABLE!

Alleluia! Alleluia! Alleluia!

This proves my point to Mr. McFarland and company: some of these incomers will be our allies in every respect. Already, one of the incoming priests for Canada has announced that he will be offering the T.L.M. once he's in. And there is no T.L.M. from any source (inclulding the S.S.P.X) anywhere near the diocese where he will be.

Meanwhile, Bishop Mercer, who is being rudely ignorned by the secular press--they don't even include him in their count of incoming bishops for England, incredibly,--has sent out a notice regarding a Mass at the TAC cathedral. I don't know any more than that. Given today's events at the second venue, I am wondering if he will be received according to the pre-conciliar rites. It would likely be his preference.

P.K.T.P.

Anonymous said...

Delphina:

No, these incomers are fully Catholic and must accept in faith and in law whatever is essential to the Catholic Faith. They are Catholics. Many of them were 99% with us even before today. The one isssue was the branch theory but let's not go there today. I'm off to buy champagne. Henry VIII: you lose!

P.K.T.P.

Anonymous said...

AYE!

AYE!

Anonymous said...

@ Delphina 18:13

No.

Members of the Ordinariate are not Anglicans,they're Anglican-Use Roman Catholics. That is, Roman Catholic who, thanks to the magnanimous munificence of the Holy Father are allowed to avail themselves of some Anglican customs and practices, especially in matters liturgical.

Anonymous said...

@ Mitre
In the past prothontaries apostolic de numero (the highest rank of "monsignor") could use pontificals, as could some canons who were members of a few specially privileged cathedral colleges.

Anonymous said...

This is great news but what would be greater news is that Rome looked after their own and fully regulated the Sons Of The Holy Redeemer. They have been waiting for a Canonical Structure for over two years. That is what the FSSPX should be looking at and be warned.

Anonymous said...

This is indeed great news, may their numbers increase, lets hope their liturgy will be beautiful but first things first their conversion was the #1 priority, I see that they ordained him deacon, then priest , then Bishop clarifying that what Pope Leo 13th said that Anglican orders were INVALID. So they were educated laymen all those years really. Now its time for the Pope to reward the FSSP by naming a couple of Bishops from them.

Jack said...

Delphina: Some of the last vestiges of pre-Reformation English spirituality are to be found among old-fashioned Anglo-Catholics: preference for Gregorian Chant, older ceremonial, and the like.

I believe that THESE are examples of the "Anglican patrimony" that the Ordinariate will bring with it.

PKTP: I hope by "eternal Rome" you're not indulging in the Protestant heresy of the invisible vs. visible Church, such as some sede-vacantists do with distinguishing "eternal Rome" from "conciliar Rome".

BTW--Since we know when Rome was founded, it's not eternal. Only God is eternal.

A Sinner said...

"For doctrinal reasons the Church does not, in any circumstances, allow the ordination of married men as bishops."

For "doctrinal reasons"?? It's an ancient tradition to be sure, of both East and West, and not one to discard. But it's odd to claim it is doctrinal, Paul himself clearly mentions bishops married to one wife. This stopped very early, but it is theologically POSSIBLE, at least.

Jack said...

Among examples of the pre-reformation Anglican patrimony that can be restored to the Latin Church are the many excellent Office books, such as Canon Winfred Douglas's MONASTIC DIURNAL and MONASTIC DIURNAL NOTED and the companion volume translated by an Anglican convent, MONASTIC MATINS

These take the traditional prayers, translated in to excellent English, and adapted to the authentic chant.

It's a shame that these and similar books were not consulted by compilers and translators of the Roman rite into English.

There are many other examples I could give, but you get the idea.

Anonymous said...

Thank you Mr. Perkins and Anonymous!

Delphina

P.S. Mr. Perkins, don't drink too much. Tomorrow's Sunday, and you don't want a hangover!

Anonymous said...

These are good news and welcome in these times with Assisi III, de Aviz, the frenzy of making popes blessed in a giff, the dreadful appointments for the weird Fisichella Council ...
I concur with P.K.T.P. that the new ordinariates will be more on the side of trads than with Bp Roche or the Mahony clique.

Anyhow I have 2 questions for those who may know : the new ordinariate is carefully avoiding Scotland and Northern Ireland. Does it mean that among the Scottish "Pikies" nobody is tempted to join ? or they are less than a few and will have to go south of the border.

Plus the new Ordinary is a married priest and that implies the ordinariate will have to require a "plain" Roman Catholic bishop for ordaining her future priests ; it gives also a new powerful right to BritChurch to oversee the Catholic Anglican autonomous quasi-diocese : the Ordinary will only be able to propose candidates but won't be able to make the decision himself.
It could become a threat on too traditional candidates in the future.

It's an impediment I had not thought of when the Constitution was issued in 2009. What does P.K.T.P. (and others) think about it ?

Alsaticus

David in Toronto said...

PKTP:

After the meeting with Archbishop Collins at Queen of Apostles Renewal Centre in Mississauga, I think we might need to pick them up off the floor.

http://www.qoa.ca/

Anonymous said...

As Fr. Chadwick pointed out on another blog, since the new man is an ordinary of a canonical structure (as even a vicar-general is), he is Msgr. Keith Newton and will remain so until retirement, when he would revert to 'Fr.'. However, if H.H. appoints the three (or any of them) as prelates of honour, they'll be Monsignori for life. That was done for Fr. Graham Leonard, former Anglican Bishop of London, who converted.

These three will look good in purple. I could mail them some purple socks.

What a great day this is!

P.K.T.P.

Anonymous said...

"I have just received the SUPERLATIVE and amazing news that a number of former Anglicans were received in England today according to the PRE-CONCILIAR Rite of Reception and with a Traditional Latin Mass."

Sorry to disappoint, Mr. Perkins, but it sure doesn't look that way to me:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/catholicism/page4/

~ Belloc

Jordanes551 said...

But it's odd to claim it is doctrinal, Paul himself clearly mentions bishops married to one wife. This stopped very early, but it is theologically POSSIBLE, at least.

St. Paul's words are held to mean that a bishop may have been married no more than one time in his life, not that married bishops are possible -- so from the days of the apostles, marriage in the episcopate was discouraged. The ancient practice was that if a married priest ever became a bishop, he and his wife were to maintain celibacy for the rest of their lives.

Ben Vallejo said...

To call the three priests "former Anglicans" is grossly inaccurate and refers only to their change of institutional spiritual allegiance. They will continue to worship in an Anglican way as Catholics.

The best way to describe them is they are Anglican Roman Catholics. Anglicans in their particular heritage, Roman in the essentials and Catholics as God willed them to be.

But the Catholic Church in England and Wales and the Church of England and would rather call them members of the Ordinariate! T

Andrew said...

Belloc,

I believe that Mr. Perkins is not referring to the Westminster ordinations, but to the reception at the Oxford Oratory:

http://liturgicalnotes.blogspot.com/2011/01/westminster-cathedral-and-ordinariate.html

Anonymous said...

Jack is at least consistent in being always dead wrong.

No, they are mainly not bringing pre-Reformation practices to the Church but, rather, those post-Reformation liturgies, hymnody and traditions of governance which are compatible with the Church. Do you always publish on subject about which you have no knowledge, Jack?

Eternal Rome is the Rome of the Eternal Church, which is fundamentally the same 'yesterday, today and tomorrow'. It is a perfectly legitimate expression and, no, I wasn't thinking of Conciliar Rome at the time I wrote it.

P.K.T.P.

Anonymous said...

Dear Alsaticus:

To answer your first question, Fr. Stork, General Secretary of the English Bishops Conference, already answered it. The Ordinariate geographically embraces only England and Wales. However, since it is personal in character, a group of Scots Anglo-Catholics will be able to join it. This sounds like a contradiction but all it means is that the Personal Ordinary will sit and have a vote in the Bishops Conference of England and Wales but not the separate Conference of Scottish Bishops.

The same could be extended to Ireland but there are so far no applicants there. Irish Protestants of all stripes, even High Anglicans, tend to be very anti-Catholic. The tiny TAC in Ireland declined to apply to accept the Pope's offer. It has only three parishes: one in the Republic and the other two in the Six Counties.

On the other question, the five Church of England bishops who are coming into the Ordinariate are all married and therefore ineligible to be consecrated as bishops. However, the sole Bishop from the TAC in England, Robert Mercer, is a celibate and a religious. He can be consecrated bishop for them to do ordinatinons. But because he is not coming from the Church of England but from the breakaway TAC, I expect that Rome will also pick a Church of England priest who is unmarried and make him a titular bishop for ordinations. He would have the power to ordain but would be ruled by Msgr. Newton.

P.K.T.P.

Anonymous said...

Andrew:

Yes, that's right but I believe the converts might only be one person. Nevertheless, it is incredible news and a precedent that can be followed by others.

P.K.T.P.

Anonymous said...

"For doctrinal reasons the Church does not, in any circumstances, allow the ordination of married men as bishops."

I remembered that a South American validly consecrated married bishop who later joined the Catholic Church took part in the Second Vatican Council but could not remember his name, so did a Google search. He was Bishop Salomao Ferraz and I think he also had children:

http://www.tboyle.net/Catholicism/Costa_Consecrations.html

Dan G.

Anonymous said...

The odd case of Bp Salomao Ferraz a Brazilian indeed titular bishop from 1963 to 1969 as a convert in 1958 from a sort of independent "Catholic" Church called ICAB in Portuguese. Thanks for bringing it in to attention.

I would like to know how it was done because it is against the Latin Canon law. Some cases were encountered with Eastern Europe clandestine bishops after the fall of communism ; I think the Vatican didn't recognized any bishop but accepted the married priests through the Eastern Churches discipline.

The Ferraz case is undoubtedly a curiosity.
Anyway "Anglicanorum coetibus" is, if I'm right, excluding any married Ordinaries.

Alsaticus

Andrew said...

It would seem that the correct way to understand the whole married bishop thing would be to say that canonically it is not allowed, however, it is not as if marriage makes a man incapable of receiving the fullness of Orders.

So, by law, married men are not made bishops but as a law it "could" be changed (not that it should) or dispensations can be granted in special cases.

Thus, it would be inaccurate to say that there are "doctrinal" or "theological" barriers to married bishops as that seems to imply that a married man is somehow sacramentally incapable of receiving episcopal consecration. If he can be ordained to the diaconate and priesthood, then certainly he can also be consecrated a bishop.

Anonymous said...

@ Alsaticus 16.I.11 6.25

AC does not exclude married ordinaries. In fact the first ordinary of the newly established Anglican-Use Ordinariate, Fr. Keith Newton, is married.

AC expressly excludes married bishops. So, the Anglican-Use Ordinariate is not likely to have a bishop as its ordinary till such time as an unmarried priest is appointed to the post.

This means that at least in the near future all candidates for ordination to the diaconate and priesthood in the Ordinariate will most probably be ordained by a member of the English & Wales hierarchy.

Andrew said...

"Anyway "Anglicanorum coetibus" is, if I'm right, excluding any married Ordinaries."

Alsaticus, you are not. The first Ordinary of England, Fr. Keith Newton, is married and has three children.

Ben Vallejo said...

It was said by several Vatican insiders during the time when the apostolic constitution was being drafted, that the Pope was willing to give a dispensation to allow married Anglican bishops to be consecrated as Catholic bishops.

However, the Russian Orthodox Church sent its concerns. Rome had to defer to Orthodox sensibilities. While mandatory priestly celibacy is not held throughout the Church, the celibacy of bishops is.

Any change in the law of mandatory celibacy in bishops will require the consent of the Orthodox Churches (which have a different take on the relationship of bishops with their dioceses). The Orthodox bishops are all monks and are wedded to their dioceses.

Anonymous said...

Andrew said:

"Thus, it would be inaccurate to say that there are 'doctrinal' or 'theological' barriers to married bishops as that seems to imply that a married man is somehow sacramentally incapable of receiving episcopal consecration."

You are inviting a debate that will result in furious and raging exchanges. Either you want such an exchange or you fail to understand the "doctrinal" and "theological" barriers. What the Church has permitted due to exceptional historical circumstances does not sweep away the aforesaid doctrinal and theological difficulties. You brush celibacy away in such a manner which leads me to believe that your are one of our Eastern brothers.

Please do some Googling to review the arguments for the traditional Latin position. I will presume, in charity, from your sweeping statement above, that you are unfamiliar with it.

I do not believe, by the way, that Father Keith Newton is a bishop, which is the point I believe that Alsaticus is making.

Giles

Jordanes551 said...

Thus, it would be inaccurate to say that there are "doctrinal" or "theological" barriers to married bishops as that seems to imply that a married man is somehow sacramentally incapable of receiving episcopal consecration.

Under the Church's universal law and perennial practice having its origins in the first century, a non-celibate married man is incapable of receiving episcopal consecration, and apparently for almost as long a married man, celibate or not, is incapable of receiving episcopal consecration.

If he can be ordained to the diaconate and priesthood, then certainly he can also be consecrated a bishop.

Non sequitur. It does not follow that a man capable of the first two degrees of Holy Orders is also capable of the highest degree.

Anonymous said...

Thanks be to God and Our Lady of Walsingham for the return of the lost brethren from the Church of England!

I wish to echo PKTP's best wishes to our newly returned brethren and to affirm our profound love for you. We need your deep and traditional faith, and hope that you can help the entire English-speaking Catholic world return to a use of reverent liturgical language.

To PKTP:
- Thanks for the news about Archp Thomas Collins looking to set up a similar Anglican-Roman Ordinariate in Toronto. It seems like the meeting was held in Mississauga, which holds 1 million of Toronto's 4.4 million souls but to date, in spite of many requests, and my own personal ones as well, has NO EF Mass offered either on Sundays nor on any day of the week.
- The closest EF Mass offered close to Mississauga is the one offered by the SSPX at the Church of the Transfiguration in Etobicoke.
- Although Toronto has 5 EF Masses available on Sunday mornings, almost all are offered by one giant of an elderly priest, 76 year old Fr. Liam Gavigan. To tell you something of "Gav", he was shovelling his own driveway last week after the snow storm.
- There is a new EF Mass being offered in Thornhill on Wednesdays at 2pm at St. Mary Immaculate Parish, by a young Hungarian priest, who though devoted struggles with weak lungs and deserves the prayers of the entire traditional Catholic community. To my knowledge this is the only EF Mass offered on weekdays in the entire archdiocese of Toronto.

In spite of 3.5 years since SP, the above summarizes the stagnant state of the EF Mass in the Archdiocese of Toronto.

Pray for Archbp Collins and his ongoing conversion, for Fr. Gavigan, and for a wide availability of EF Masses in Mississauga, and the entire archdiocese of Toronto. And may the Anglo-Catholics who have just joined help us Torontonians to get there.

Sincerely,
Neophyte

Jack said...

\\No, they are mainly not bringing pre-Reformation practices to the Church but, rather, those post-Reformation liturgies, hymnody and traditions of governance which are compatible with the Church. Do you always publish on subject about which you have no knowledge, Jack? \\

Apparently, you're not familiar with the various translations of pre-reformation hymns, office books, and other liturgical matter made and used by Anglo-Catholics for centuries, either as supplements to the BCP or in place of it.

Names such as G. E. H. Palmer and Winfred Douglas come immediately to mind.

You can find their musical and liturgical labors on ebay all the time.

I ought to know about them, because I used them for years in my sojourn in Anglicanism.

Do you always publish on subject about which you have no knowledge, PKTP?

Jack said...

Regarding married bishops:

Yes, they did exist at one time, but it was decided that it was better for the Church that they be unmarried.

Many Orthodox bishops are widowers.

Bishops in Orthodoxy are chosen from among the monks, even if a pro-forma monastic tonsure is performed before ordination to the Episcopate.

The idea is that that bishops should first be men of prayer. He has the presbyters and deacons to take care of mundane administrative details.

I have nothing against married bishops as such, but it will take nothing less than an Ecumenical Council (from the Orthodox viewpoint) to change this discipline.