Rorate Caeli

Scola back home

In the worst-kept Roman secret since Clodius's intrusion of Bona Dea's December rites, the Pope today named Cardinal Angelo Scola, up to now Patriarch of Venice, new Archbishop of Milan. Scola was born in the territory of the Ambrosian Metropolitan See, the largest in the Old World, 69 years ago. 

Over half the Popes in the past 100 years - Saint Sarto, Blessed Roncalli, Luciani (Venice); Ratti, Montini (Milan) - occupied one of both major Italian Sees in which Scola has served or is about to serve.

His latest interview, to The Universe (posted today at his personal website), is not very promising, unfortunately - nothing disturbing, it just seems to perpetuate the platitudes of the past five decades. May he be a good Pastor to his Ambrosian faithful, and generous and kind to those dedicated to the Traditional Rites of the Latin Church, as he was in Venice.

22 comments:

Joe @ Defend Us In Battle said...

I have heard that the Holy Father does not appreciate "leaks" concerning things of this nature, but to me all these "leaks" show how methodical everything is and how the H.F. makes well educated and strong moves in this regard.

I pray that good things and good Bishops will continue to be appointed in the American dioceses; there are many places in dire need.

The Guild Master said...

He might try to look a little more cheerful!

Mr. Ortiz said...

"I do not at all agree with those who say that this is a papacy which has generated crises. There have been moments when he has had to take on his own shoulders great problems of other men of the Church, and he did so by taking the lead, without ever pulling back."

From the interview noted.

Quite an understatement, and actually, I think it speaks well of Scola to say it.

Cola di Cola said...

"He might try to look a little more cheerful!"

He is not running for office like some simpleton politician, he is about serious business; saving soul's.

Anonymous said...

The Guild Master said . . .
"He might try to look a little more cheerful!"

On the contrary, he is exhibiting the Roman & respected virtue of GRAVITAS -- something lacking in not a few current bishops.

This virtue is a deep-rooted seriousness that defined Roman character and most of the world's bishops up till the time of Vatican II .

Because of this trait, the Modernists perhaps considered this virtue as undesirable , even unimaginative. Even today such notions persist, analogous to the Roman soldiers as mindless storm troopers in service to the Emperor in Star Wars.

As propganda, the virtue of gravitas underscores obedience to authority which was disseminated even in classical literary texts. In Virgil's underworld, Aeneas' father tells him that Rome's art is not her greatness, but her power to enforce Roman Law throughout the world.

"Roman, remember by your strength to rule
Earth's peoples--for your arts are to be these:
To pacify, to impose the rule of law,
to spare the conquered, battle down the proud (VI. 753-756)

In conjunction with the sense of duty, Pietas: Gravitas has larger implications for understanding human experience. For example, in times of war, men in particular feel gravitas when they face battle.

My conclusion: Let the Church restore the virtue of Gravitas among the clergy in official, public & liturgical functions to help rid the the buffoonery that has gained so much acceptance.

Mr. Ortiz said...

...is Eminence Angelo Cardinal Scola, the Patriarch of Venice, who was recently featured on the NLM, will assist pontificaliter at a Holy Mass according to the Extraordinary Form which Fr Konrad zu Löwenstein FSSP will celebrate on Saturday 6 March 2010, at 5.30 p.m. The Mass will be sung in the FSSP church in Venice, San Simeon Piccolo, which has been mentioned repeatedly on the NLM (cf here or here). Apparently this will be the first time that an Italian residential cardinal participates in an usus antiquior Mass."

from an old post from NLM...

A.M. Gerasah said...

papabile?

Kim Andrew D'Souza said...

The two sentences before the one cited by Mr. Ortiz are equally significant: "First of all, the Holy Father is very well and is doing his task in a formidable way, giving us a teaching of the highest level that is arousing enormous and impassioned dialogue throughout the whole world. Second, he is renewing the pastoral work of the Church through rooting it in the liturgy and the sacraments." That Scola sees the liturgy as central to the pastoral renewal of the Church is evidenced by the recent Papal Mass at Aquileia (the historic 'patriarcate' whose title now belongs to Venice), which I think is the best outdoor Mass 'on the road' we've seen yet. As well, in the Cardinal's own ceremonies at San Marco, I notice an improvement every time I see new pictures of the latest events. The photoset of his Corpus Christi procession is at http://angeloscola.it/2011/06/27/corpus-domini-le-immagini-della-celebrazione-e-della-processione-in-piazza-san-marco

J. G. Ratkaj said...

Cardinal Scola is the most optimal prelate, after more than 50 years of deeply unhappy and shady incumbents, for the see of St. Ambrose since the passing of saintly cardinal Ildefonso Schuster in 1954.

Brian said...

Q. What do you see as the main challenges facing the Catholic Church today?

A. I think the principal challenge, which the Church shares with every other social subject in the field, is the interpretation of the post-modern. The question is; have we, or have we not entered the post-modern world?


Can you imagine our Lady appearing and spewing such nonsense?

Anonymous said...

papabile?

You never know. There might be a Pope Scola in our future.

Anonymous said...

I don't know enough about His Eminence to remark on the "papabile" comments.

But I do like his serious look, almost a scowl. If I'm going into battle and the situation in the Church and the world is as dire as it is, I don't want to see one of my generals looking too cheerful.

Jason

Mr. Ortiz said...

Excellent remarks on the virtues of pietas and gravitas.

I cringe when my pastor hits the sanctuary. It's kiddy time, for the most part, though I try to pray for the dear man, he just doesn't get these indispensible virtues.

I am reminded of a prayer of St. Josemaria Escriva: may my young priests have the gravity of a seventy year old man.

Steve said...

I have nothing against the new Archbishop. I simply recall what Our Lady of the Rosary gravely stated in her first visit to Fatima, "Only I can help you".

Anonymous said...

Brian,

What he is 'spouting' is a reflection on the fact that the world (culture, technology, etc.) is changing at an exponential rate and that the Church needs to be prepared to address the issues that will arise.

Anonymous said...

What is it about this man's record and his sanctity that one would think would make him the right man for Milan? Is he essentially a brilliant administrator; a holy inspiration to clergy and laity alike; is he a theologian or is he attached to the beauty of the liturgy as is our Holy Father?

Brian said...

Anonymous 19:10
And this is the main challenge facing the Catholic Church today?

Sounds fine if you are a first year graduate student writing an essay in a modern issues seminar, but please, look around.

Anonymous said...

Anon 14.55 wrote:

"My conclusion: Let the Church restore the virtue of Gravitas among the clergy in official, public & liturgical functions to help rid the the buffoonery that has gained so much acceptance."

I think you are right- Holy Mass in particular would be a very good place to start where the personality of the priest should not be in evidence.

I was told by a good priest Pope Pius XII hardly ever smiled for the reasons the you stated , Anon 14.55.

Barbara

Anonymous said...

Brian,

Certainly you realize that two of the root causes of the problems of the Church today is the development of advanced forms of artificial contraception and the cultural changes of the 20th Century. So, yes, I do think Cardinal Scola is correct in his statement. New challenges, perhaps even greater than those that arose in the 20th Century, are on the near horizon. I'm glad that at least one Church leader is thinking about them.

Brian said...

Oh I see. I guess I am just not intellectual enough to pick up that when Cardinal Scola says “I think the principal challenge, which the Church shares with every other social subject in the field, is the interpretation of the post-modern. The question is; have we, or have we not entered the post-modern world? , what he means is that the "root causes of the problems of the Church today is the development of advanced forms of artificial contraception."

But if contraception is the concern, why didn't Cardinal Scola just say, the main problem of the Church today is that the majority of Catholics disregard Catholic teaching, practice contraception, and are living in an objective state of mortal sin?

Or, if abortion under the guise of contraception is the concern, why did he not say that the majority of American Catholics voted for the most pro-abortion president in history and that bishops did next to nothing and do not have the moral courage to ex-communicate a single pro-abortion "Catholic" politician and that the major Catholic university in American publically honored this advocate for the murder of unborn children and arrested an elderly priest who protested against this scandalous action?

Anonymous said...

Because those are symptoms of an underlying change in philosophy. Ideas do matter.

Brian said...

I agree with you that these are symptoms.

Another symptom of the same disease is that when a Catholic Cardinal is asked:

What do you see as the main challenges facing the Catholic Church today?

He responds:

I think the principal challenge, which the Church shares with every other social subject in the field, is the interpretation of the post-modern. The question is; have we, or have we not entered the post-modern world?

You, of course, may choose to respond, but I do not believe that further discussion will be very productive. So I am finished with this.