Rorate Caeli

Love and Aspersion of Blood

In ashes and in cilice - let us add our little grain of sand on the path  of the Sacred Priestly Sacrifice of the Supreme Priest, His path to Jerusalem, Passion, and Death. Let us empty ourselves of our love for self and join the Love who loved us with His Most Precious Blood, each day present upon the Altar.

A very fruitful Lent to all our readers, especially our dear Priests, who labor so deeply for our salvation. Thank you!

Think of My suffering and that of the saints, and cease complaining. You have not yet resisted to the shedding of blood. What you suffer is very little compared with the great things they suffered who were so strongly tempted, so severely troubled, so tried and tormented in many ways. Well may you remember, therefore, the very painful woes of others, that you may bear your own little ones the more easily. And if they do not seem so small to you, examine if perhaps your impatience is not the cause of their apparent greatness; and whether they are great or small, try to bear them all patiently. The better you dispose yourself to suffer, the more wisely you act and the greater is the reward promised you. Thus you will suffer more easily if your mind and habits are diligently trained to it.

Do not say: "I cannot bear this from such a man, nor should I suffer things of this kind, for he has done me a great wrong. He has accused me of many things of which I never thought. However, from someone else I will gladly suffer as much as I think I should."

Such a thought is foolish, for it does not consider the virtue of patience or the One Who will reward it, but rather weighs the person and the offense committed. The man who will suffer only as much as seems good to him, who will accept suffering only from those from whom he is pleased to accept it, is not truly patient. For the truly patient man does not consider from whom the suffering comes, whether from a superior, an equal, or an inferior, whether from a good and holy person or from a perverse and unworthy one; but no matter how great an adversity befalls him, no matter how often it comes or from whom it comes, he accepts it gratefully from the hand of God, and counts it a great gain. For with God nothing that is suffered for His sake, no matter how small, can pass without reward. Be prepared for the fight, then, if you wish to gain the victory. Without struggle you cannot obtain the crown of patience, and if you refuse to suffer you are refusing the crown. But if you desire to be crowned, fight bravely and bear up patiently. Without labor there is no rest, and without fighting, no victory.
The Imitation of Christ (III, XIX)

1 comment:

Wills said...

Thank you New Catholic, for this post and this excerpt from Imitation of Christ. Another very good short text for the beginning of Lent is St. Alphonsus Liguori's Uniformity With God's Will which contains many similar thoughts.