Rorate Caeli

The TLM in German-speaking lands: statistics since 2007

While much attention is being focused on the news that the Archdiocese of Berlin is undergoing "significant restructuring" (a euphemism for 105 parishes being scheduled for reduction to 30 parishes by 2020), it might be instructive to take a look as well at how Summorum Pontificum is faring in Germany, as well as in Austria and Switzerland. The following statistics of canonically-regular Traditional Latin Masses (i.e. those under diocesan auspices and not including those of the SSPX) are from the website of Pro Missa Tridentina

AS OF JANUARY 16, 2013:

Germany -  152 locations with the Traditional Latin Mass:
                 -- 53 every Sunday (of which 32 also have them on Holy Days of obligation) 
                 -- 27 one to three Sundays per month
                 -- 72 on weekdays only

Austria -  33 locations with the Traditional Mass:
               -- 11 every Sunday (of which 8 also have them on Holy Days of obligation) 
               -- 5 one or two Sundays per month
               -- 17 on weekdays only

Switzerland - 39 locations with the Traditional Latin Mass:
                   -- 22 every Sunday (of which 12 also have them on Holy Days of obligation) 
                   -- 4 one or two Sundays per month
                   -- 13 on weekdays only


AS OF MARCH 24, 2012:

Germany -  148 locations with the Traditional Latin Mass:
                 -- 53 every Sunday (of which 28 also have them on Holy Days of obligation) 
                 -- 26 one to three Sundays per month
                 -- 69 on weekdays only

Austria -  32 locations with the Traditional Mass:
               -- 12 every Sunday (of which 7 also have them on Holy Days of obligation) 
               -- 4 one or two Sundays per month
               -- 16 on weekdays only

Switzerland - 41 locations with the Traditional Latin Mass:
                   -- 23 every Sunday (of which 12 also have them on Holy Days of obligation) 
                   -- 4 one or two Sundays per month
                   -- 14 on weekdays only

Germany -  148 locations with the Traditional Latin Mass:
                 -- 52 every Sunday (of which 28 also have them on Holy Days of obligation) 
                 -- 31 one to three Sundays per month
                 -- 65 on weekdays only

Austria -  31 locations with the Traditional Mass:
               -- 12 every Sunday (of which 7 also have them on Holy Days of obligation) 
               -- 4 one or two Sundays per month
               -- 15 on weekdays only

Switzerland - 41 locations with the Traditional Latin Mass:
                   -- 23 every Sunday (of which 14 also have them on Holy Days of obligation) 
                   -- 5 one or two Sundays per month
                   -- 13 on weekdays only
            


Germany -  137 locations with the Traditional Latin Mass:
                 -- 49 every Sunday (of which 23 also have them on Holy Days of obligation) 
                 -- 27 one to three Sundays per month
                 -- 60 on weekdays only 

Austria -  27 locations with the Traditional Mass:
               -- 11 every Sunday (of which 7 also have them on Holy Days of obligation) 
               -- 3 one or two Sundays per month
               -- 13 on weekdays only

Switzerland - 37 locations with the Traditional Latin Mass:
                   -- 21 every Sunday (of which 12 also have them on Holy Days of obligation) 
                   -- 4 one or two Sundays per month
                   -- 12 on weekdays only

"On weekdays only" encompasses Mass sites ranging from those with a Traditional Latin Mass one weekday per quarter to those that have it on one or more days in the course of a week.

The statistics for Switzerland include the whole country, and not just the German-speaking areas.

According to a press release published by Pro Missa Tridentina in 2008, the situation in Germany before and immediately after Summorum Pontificum was as follows:

February 15, 2008 - 90 locations 
End of December 2007 - 78 locations (more than double in less than half a year!)
July 2007 (just before Summorum Pontificum) - 35 locations
1997 - 23 locations with the Traditional Latin Mass (monthly, weekly, weekdays, etc.)

It is evident that between Feb. 2008 and Feb. 2010, the number of Traditional Latin Mass locations increased from 90 to 137 in Germany. 

13 comments:

R said...

Why did Austria lose 1 weekly Sunday Mass since 2012?

Matt said...

105 parishes being pared down to 30?! Mind-boggling. A Catholic version of a mega-parish I suppose.

Can we presumed the TLMs are said in those parishes being down-sized? Can it be said those bishops have found a way to eliminate those pesky Traditionalists?

It gives credence to ++Gomez of Los Angeles' statement, at least, Tradition must be a part of the New Evangelization.

Konstantin said...

What's sad is that the TLM movement is pretty week in the big(formerly majority) Catholic cities such as Munich and Cologne. Please pray for the Church in Germany!

Fred said...

modest growth, but not enough to save the German speaking people.

Augustinus said...

Konstantin:

According to the statistics of Pro Missa Tridentina, the Archdiocese of Munich has 14 locations with the TLM, 4 of them with the Mass every Sunday, while the Archdiocese of Cologne has 11, 5 of them with the Mass every Sunday. These two archdioceses are, in terms of the presence of the TLM, among the most blessed in the whole world.

Konstantin said...

Augustinus:

What I was trying to get across was the lack of TLM activity in the larger traditionally Catholic cities.

There are quite a number of masses in the respective archdioceses, yet as far as I know the cities of Munich and Cologne only have one Sunday mass in the EF each.

I live in one of the suffragan dioceses of Munich and we have two well attended TLMs that are only about 3-4 miles apart. Both places don't have more than 20.000 inhabitants combined. That's a bit of a stark contrast if you consider that 36,2 % of Munich's 1.4 million inhabitants are Roman Catholics.


God bless!

Richard malcolm said...

The FSSP has 28 mass locations and 10 houses in Germany - its third greatest presence after France and the United States.

They are a big part of this (modest, alas) growth, and it is easy to see why. The harvest is vast but the laborers are few.

LeonG said...

Graphically, the movement is plateauing at present. Once the downsizing takes effect amongst the NO we shall see a renewed rise in Mass centres as the new traditional vocations reach maturity. One hopes that The Holy Mass is being properly said and the rubrics are being respected. This is essential to avoid any novusordoising.

Matt said...

LeonG said, novusordoising.

Well said but what a mouthfull to say. ;-]

Gratias said...

Some bishops will use the FSSP to marginalize development of the EF mass. It is a double-edged sword. We should have Diocesan mass in many parishes, but bishops actively block them. For this reason His Exellency Nuncio Vignanò should only propose names of priests that have offered the TLM in the USA. The EF would spread llke wildfire. OTOH some of the FSSP priests should be appointed Bishops, for example of the Ordinariate rejected by SSPX.

Usus Antiquior said...

"It seems to me that, perhaps, this has been a factor in lessening the appeal of the TLM in Germany. That is to say the fact that, if the Germans were already accustomed to truckloads of vernacular in their sung Masses before Vatican II, then perhaps, at an emotional level, the post-conciliar liturgical dispensation may have been less jarring/differentiated than experienced elsewhere - hence lessening the obvious appeal of the TLM in German lands."

And yet Germany has far more TLM locations, both in terms of raw numbers and per capita, than the vast majority of Catholic countries that did not have traditions of vernacular in the liturgy. In short: there are other, more important factors.

Tony from Oz said...

Usus Antiquior

That's a fair point, as nobody else had raised the per capita base comparison.

Do any German readers have anything to say about the seeming national addiction to singing Bach-esque propers in the vernacular, especially where these are adopted at German TLMs? Or is the incidence of this overstated, or even a furphy?

Tony from Oz

JabbaPapa said...

Inquisitor :

Pope Pius XII : If it [the traditio instrumentorum] was at one time necessary even for validity by the will and command of the Church, every one knows that the Church has the power to change and abrogate what she herself has established.

It strikes me that he is referring to such matters of Church Discipline as Pope Gelasius I formally banning women from being ordained as priests, as the establishment of the deacons both male and female, then the eventual discontinuation of both orders, as the re-establishment of the male deacons in recent years, as the rather numerous changes that have occurred historically in the various orders, clerical, religious, or lay, the minor orders, and so on and so forth -- and such things as the ritual contents of ceremonies signifying religious changes in each particular individual's position in the Church relative to this Discipline and those orders.

It should not be forgotten, too, that each particular Order will have its own Rule, determined not just by the Church, but also by the members of that Order themselves.

It would seem that it is indeed a constant teaching of the Church that in these sorts of matters concerning Holy Orders, the Church does indeed have the power to change and abrogate what she herself has established -- the sole exception in the above list of examples being that Pope Gelasius' ban on the ordination of women is provided with the charism of infallibility -- so that in this particular case, Pope Pius' general statement is overruled by a higher Authority.

This infallible doctrine does not falsify Pope Pius XII's statement -- it qualifies that statement. I am sure that it will not be difficult for you to think of several other infallible doctrines relative to the Sacrament of Holy Orders that would qualify that teaching in some similar or analogous manner or other.