Rorate Caeli

Ad multos annos!
Going forward with certainty


16. Apr. MCMXXVII

On the same day I was born, thanks to my parent’s concern, I was also reborn through water and the Holy Spirit ... . First, there is the gift of life that my parents gave me in very difficult times, and for which I thank them. But it cannot be taken for granted that human life in itself is a gift. Can it really be a beautiful gift? Do we know what will befall man in the dark days ahead — or in the brighter days that could come? Can we foresee to what troubles, what terrible events he might be exposed? Is it right to simply give life like this? Is it responsible or too uncertain? It is a problematic gift, if it is left to itself. Biological life is in itself a gift, but it is surrounded by a great question. It becomes a true gift only if, along with it, we are given a promise that is stronger than any evil that could threaten us, if it is immersed in a power that ensures that it is good to be human, that there will be good for this person no matter what the future brings. Thus, with birth is associated rebirth, the certitude that, truly, it is good to be alive, because the promise is stronger than evil. This is the meaning of rebirth by water and the Holy Spirit: to be immersed in the promise that only God can make — it is good that you exist, and you can be certain of that whatever comes. With this assurance I was able to live, reborn by water and the Holy Spirit. Nicodemus asks the Lord: “How can an old man possibly be reborn?”. Now, rebirth is given to us in Baptism, but we must continually grow in it, we must always let ourselves be immersed by God in his promise, in order to be truly reborn in the great, new family of God which is stronger than every weakness and than any negative power that threatens us. Therefore, this is a day of great thanksgiving.

The day I was baptized, as I said, was Holy Saturday. Then it was still customary to anticipate the Easter Vigil in the morning, which would still be followed by the darkness of Holy Saturday, without the Alleluia. It seems to me that this singular paradox, this singular anticipation of light in a day of darkness, could almost be an image of the history of our times. On the one hand, there is still the silence of God and his absence, but in the Resurrection of Christ there is already the anticipation of the “yes” of God, and on the basis of this anticipation we live and, through the silence of God, we hear him speak, and through the darkness of his absence we glimpse his light. The anticipation of the Resurrection in the middle of an evolving history is the power that points out the way to us and helps us to go forward.

Let us thank the good Lord for he has given us this light and let us pray to him so that it might endure forever. And on this day I have special cause to thank him and all those who have ever anew made me perceive the presence of the Lord, who have accompanied me so that I might never lose the light.

I am now facing the last chapter of my life and I do not know what awaits me. I know, however, that the light of God exists, that he is Risen, that his light is stronger than any darkness, that the goodness of God is stronger than any evil in this world. And this helps me to go forward with certainty. May this help us to go forward, and at this moment I wholeheartedly thank all those who have continually helped me to perceive the “yes” of God through their faith.
Benedict XVI
Mass on the occasion of the 85th birthday
April 16, 2012

10 comments:

blindfella said...

Not surprisingly, those were beautiful and highly quotable comments. May God reward Pope Benedict.

RipK said...

Ad multos annos! Εις πολλά έτη Δέσποτα!
We terribly miss you.

I know some of you will enjoy this a lot (courtesy of ORBIS CATHOLICVS SECVNDVS, Thank you John Sonnen!)
http://orbiscatholicussecundus.blogspot.com/2013/04/for-your-enjoyment.html

Uncle Claibourne said...

We miss you, Papa. We miss you....

Michael Ortiz said...

May the Risen One bless richly this good, holy priest, bishop, and Holy Father!

Send us more shepherds like him!

Chateaubriand said...

Pulchrum

John Fisher said...

We love you Pope Benedict! May we all meet in heaven!

Osusanna said...

I love and miss you Pope Benedict. Happy birthday and many, more.

Katalina said...

Contrary to a false press rumor from El Mundo the Pope Emeritus does not have a terminal or serious illness and is NOT dying as some have tried to say. He is however slowing down because he is getting old turning 86 today. He is in the "golden years" of his life and today we should all be praying for him thinking about him and above all thanking God for the gift of the 8 years he gave to us and the Church

Unknown said...

A most holy and beautiful man of God. I miss him at the helm too but he has more time to pray for us now. Easy to find his address at C. Gandalfo and send him a greeting card as a tangible token. Beannacht De Papa a stoir!.

NBW said...

May God Bless him! I miss you Pope Benedict.