Rorate Caeli

Venite et videte opera Domini . . . .

Venite et videte opera Domini, quantas posuerit solitudines in terra,conpescuit bella usque ad extremum terrae. Arcum confringet et concidet hastam plaustra conburet igni.
"Come and behold ye the works of the Lord: what wonders he hath done upon earth, making wars to cease even to the end of the earth. He shall destroy the bow, and break the weapons: and the shield he shall burn in the fire."
Psalm 45:9-10


O God, from whom all holy desires, all right counsels and all just works do proceed, give to Thy servants that peace which the world cannot give, that our hearts may be disposed to obey Thy commandments, and the fear of enemies being removed, our times, by Thy protection, may be peaceful. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, who liveth and reigneth with Thjee in the unity of the Holy Spirit, God, world without end. Amen. -- Collect from the traditional Votive Mass for Peace


Almighty, everlasting God, in whose hand are the power and the government of every nation, look to the help of the Christian people, that the heathen nations, who trust in their own fierceness, may be crushed by the power of Thy right arm. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, who liveth and reigneth with Thee in the unity of the Holy Spirit, God, world without end. Amen. -- Collect from the traditional Votive Mass against the Heathen


-- For the intentions of Christ's Vicar, Pope Francis, for peace in Syria and throughout the Middle East: FULL TEXT OF THE POPE'S HOMILY ON SEPTEMBER 7, IN ENGLISH

5 comments:

Bernardus Stockermans said...

Amen.

Just curious: from what version of the vulgate was that psalm text?

Jordanes551 said...

The one found here:

http://www.latinvulgate.com/

Unfortunately I don't know enough about the versions and recensions of the Vulgata to answer your question more specifically.

Pulex said...

This is neither Vulgate, nor Neovulgate, and neither it is the Roman Psalter. It is the so-called 'juxta hebraeos', probably translated by St. Jerome directly from Hebrew.

Jordanes551 said...

Thanks for the identification.

Reading a little now on the Iuxta Hebraeos Psalter, I see that it was included in a few manuscripts of the Vulgata. Thus, one can say that even the Iuxta Hebraeos is a part of the Vulgata, just not within the main stream of the Vulgate tradition, since the Gallican Psalter is the one that was used liturgical, in particular being the one from whom the Mass Proper chants were derived.

Andris Amoliņš said...

The oldest part of the repertory of Mass proper chants are taken from the Roman psalter which could mean that they antedate the adoption of the Gallican psalter in Rome. For example, Psalm 41 in the Divine Office starts with "Quemadmodum desiderat cervus ..." (Gallican psalter), but the tract of Easter Vigil Mass starts with "Sicut cervus desiderat ..." (Roman psalter).