Rorate Caeli

Time to tell the truth

This is such an astonishing article - and one that would have been impossible to find in a "mainstream Catholic venue" just a few short years ago - that we have to link to it.  From CNA:

August 04, 2011
The liturgical impact of homosexuality in the priesthood
By Louie Verrecchio *
...
"In the Novus Ordo, however, the priest most commonly offers Holy Mass in the vernacular versus populum (facing the people) wherein his personality (and at times his emotional health) is unavoidably on display. Aware of the impact that his liturgical persona can have on the experience of the assembled faithful, the priest often feels tremendous pressure to draw upon his personal resources to “perform” his duties in a compelling way. Even in the best of circumstances, it is quite natural for the priest to feel moved to so meet the expectant eyes and ears of the faithful such as they are ever cast upon him in the newly configured rite.

"For the priest who also struggles with an underlying inclination toward narcissism, the temptation to use the liturgy as a venue for seeking attention and personal gratification can be all but overwhelming. 

"Given the fact that the Council Fathers encouraged neither the dramatic change in the priest’s posture toward the people nor the construction of free-standing altars to accommodate the practice, it is reasonable to wonder what sorts of influences and pressures within the priestly population itself may have allowed for such a radical liturgical innovation to take hold so quickly.

"Now, I don’t propose to offer an exhaustive treatment here, but I would suggest that at least one contributing factor among many may be suggested in the data found in the John Jay Report. ..." [Read whole article.]

13 comments:

Anonymous said...

As I commented over there:

There is truth to this but it would do well to be balanced out by an acknowledgment of the attraction of homosexuals to high ritual and so on as well as classical music and fine art. I would guess that far more gays are attracted to chant and polyphony than to Gather Us In.

Look to the Anglican Church for examples of that - High Church Anglican churches that are practically Tridentine in appearance and practice that are radical in politics and very pro-gay - and probably staffed by gays - male and female.

There were gay priests before Vatican II. The problem is that so many of the straight priests left - leaving the gays predmoninant - which then became a self-fulfilling prophecy as heterosexual men become unwilling to enter into a gay-dominated seminary or religious order environment.

(Waiting for Jim Martin SJ to have vapors over this piece in 3 - 2- 1)

Ellen

New Catholic said...

Ellen, it's one thing to have these kinds of people "attracted" to the aesthetics of Tradition - it is quite another, and that is the author's point, to have their weaknesses INFLUENCE the way liturgy actually plays itself out. That is the power of Tradition - it attracts, but it does not bend to the whims of anyone.


Once the road to "creativity" is "liberated", the influence of all that is evil (including in one's own character) in Sacred Liturgy is unstoppable, and can be irreversible.


Anyway, the matter is naturally debatable, but the terms of the debate are changing, outside the Traditional-minded Catholic world where these discussions have been common for decades. That in itself is quite encouraging.

NC

Malta said...

"Given the fact that the Council Fathers encouraged neither the dramatic change in the priest’s posture toward the people nor the construction of free-standing altars to accommodate the practice..."

Did they discourage it?

Jordanes551 said...

Waiting for Jim Martin SJ to have vapors over this piece in 3 - 2- 1

Why would this piece give him flatulence?

rodrigo said...

A good moment at which to remind ourselves of the words of Pope Benedict XVI:

"Homosexuality is incompatible with the priestly vocation. Otherwise, celibacy itself would lose its meaning as a renunciation. It would be extremely dangerous if celibacy became a sort of pretext for bringing people into the priesthood who don't want to get married anyway. For, in the end, their attitude toward man and woman is somehow distorted, off center, and, in any case, is not within the direction of creation of which we have spoken. The Congregation for Education issued a decision a few years ago to the effect that homosexual candidates cannot become priests because their sexual orientation estranges them from the proper sense of paternity, from the intrinsic nature of priestly being... The greatest attention is needed here in order to prevent the intrusion of this kind of ambiguity and to head off a situation where the celibacy of priests would practically end up being identified with the tendency to homosexuality.

Anonymous said...

No priest who uses the liturgy to play games or the pulpit to promte his own idea of the faith should stay. If the bishop would just remove the erring priest all this would be solved. Unfortunately many of the Bishops themselves are this kind of priest and ignore others indiscretions. They keep ignoring things till the problem which could have been solved instantly is allowed to grow to several priests or more in their diocese.

Anonymous said...

In an old Homiletic and Pastoral Review (12-07) I found the definitive Thomistic psychological analysis of this liturgical-moral dynamics.

A reprint can be found here:

http://northlandcatholic.blogspot.com/2008/08/liturgical-and-sexual-abuses-how-could.html

LeonG said...

http://www.catholicnewsagency.com/column.php?n=1722

This must be one of the first articles on CNA I have ever felt almost total accord with.
Personally knowing several homosexual clergy & religious including influential ones in Scotland many years ago, made me understand better how the presbyterate has been subverted from its inception by the very liturgy it performs. The NO encourages narcissism and self-preoccupation. It stimulates presbyterial individualisation of the liturgy because it disembodies Roman Catholicism by its very synthetic and linguistically malleable structure. Rubrical comprehension has been relativised & subjectivised by liberal modernist philosophies. In a church where there is little to no discipline such liturgical praxis is immensely dangerous both on the "worship space" and off it. We know this today because, objectively speaking, we can observe the damage being done.

Anonymous said...

Ellen said...

"There is truth to this but it would do well to be balanced out by an acknowledgment of the attraction of homosexuals to high ritual and so on as well as classical music and fine art. I would guess that far more gays are attracted to chant and polyphony than to Gather Us In."

I wouldn't be so sure about that last sentence.

There are two traits of homosexual culture at work here: aethesticism and narcissism. What is not commonly observed is that even though these two traits emphasis emotionalism and performance each in their own way, they are at cross-purposes -- Apollonian versus Dionysian tendencies.

High Anglicanism is a natural haven for the aetheticists. In performance terms, it is Apollonian and orderly.

The narcissistic tendency is Dionysian and ecstatic; it finds its home in the Marty Haugen / "Gather" hymnal crowd. If you look at things like the infamous Youtube videos of LA's Religious-Ed Congress (the gayest thing this side of Castro Street), you won't see them singing Thomas Tallis.

A Canberra Observer said...

New Catholic, while I agree in principle on the difficulty of an individual individualising the EF, this is however possible, especially in places where there is one priest and very little liturgical catechesis or interest. My observation of quite a few years now is that there is ample room for knowing experimentation and/or unknowing non-adherence. And I think it is a given that the EF attracts strong willed characters. NB my points are unrelated to the homosecual debate.

Anonymous said...

Ellen's comments on classical music are completely off. They are a hasty generalisation. I think that inverts are especially attached to the ballet but definitely not opera, for instance. I don't associate them with 'classical' music, esp. when that term refers to the classical period strictly speaking, the age of Haydn and Mozart and Muzio Clementi.

In terms of music, you will find more inverts listening to rock noise than to anything else. In fact, a surprising number of the makers of rock noise are sexual inverts. But I'm told theyn listen to a certain variety of that noise--noise, as it does not qualify as music.

P.K.T.P.

Anonymous said...

In an old Homiletic and Pastoral Review (12-07) I found the definitive Thomistic psychological analysis of this liturgical-moral dynamics.

A reprint can be found here:

http://northlandcatholic.blogspot.com/2008/08/liturgical-and-sexual-abuses-how-could.html

Thanks for the link, the blogger sums it up nicely:

Saturday, August 23, 2008
Liturgical and Sexual Abuses: How could it have gone so wrong?

If you don't ever read any other article, please follow the link and read this one. The history of the Church these past 40+ years has been catastrophic, on the altars, and in the rectories. And those situations are very closely related it turns out. How did that happen?

G.C. Dilsaver wrote this article that was published last December in Homiletic and Pastoral Review. Using Thomistic philosophy and theology that is easy to understand, Dilsaver explains how the rigidity of the older form of a Mass full of reverence abruptly changed to a free form Mass where the focus was on the "presider's" chair, rather than the "Holy of Holies." From there, he explains, it was a very short step for a few priests to begin to explore their personal morality.

Alan Aversa said...

Homosexuality and idolatry are related; see Romans 1. When the mass idolizes people in the place of giving God the worship due to him, homosexuality will abound. It's that simple.