Rorate Caeli

Benedict XVI versus the "call to disobedience" as well as the "fossilization of traditions"

The following passage us from the Pope's Chrism Mass homily today, April 5, 2012. Emphases mine:


...We need, I need, not to claim my life as my own, but to place it at the disposal of another – of Christ. I should be asking not what I stand to gain, but what I can give for him and so for others. Or to put it more specifically, this configuration to Christ, who came not to be served but to serve, who does not take, but rather gives – what form does it take in the often dramatic situation of the Church today? Recently a group of priests from a European country issued a summons to disobedience, and at the same time gave concrete examples of the forms this disobedience might take, even to the point of disregarding definitive decisions of the Church’s Magisterium, such as the question of women’s ordination, for which Blessed Pope John Paul II stated irrevocably that the Church has received no authority from the Lord. Is disobedience a path of renewal for the Church? We would like to believe that the authors of this summons are motivated by concern for the Church, that they are convinced that the slow pace of institutions has to be overcome by drastic measures, in order to open up new paths and to bring the Church up to date. But is disobedience really a way to do this? Do we sense here anything of that configuration to Christ which is the precondition for all true renewal, or do we merely sense a desperate push to do something to change the Church in accordance with one’s own preferences and ideas?

But let us not oversimplify matters. Surely Christ himself corrected human traditions which threatened to stifle the word and the will of God? Indeed he did, so as to rekindle obedience to the true will of God, to his ever enduring word. His concern was for true obedience, as opposed to human caprice. Nor must we forget: he was the Son, possessed of singular authority and responsibility to reveal the authentic will of God, so as to open up the path for God’s word to the world of the nations. And finally: he lived out his task with obedience and humility all the way to the Cross, and so gave credibility to his mission. Not my will, but thine be done: these words reveal to us the Son, in his humility and his divinity, and they show us the true path.

Let us ask again: do not such reflections serve simply to defend inertia, the fossilization of traditions? No. Anyone who considers the history of the post-conciliar era can recognize the process of true renewal, which often took unexpected forms in living movements and made almost tangible the inexhaustible vitality of holy Church, the presence and effectiveness of the Holy Spirit. And if we look at the people from whom these fresh currents of life burst forth and continue to burst forth, then we see that this new fruitfulness requires being filled with the joy of faith, the radicalism of obedience, the dynamic of hope and the power of love.

41 comments:

OutsideObserver said...

Interesting. The Pope lashes out against Liberals and Traditionalists.

This will be an interesting year.

Francis said...

"No. Anyone who considers the history of the post-conciliar era can recognize the process of true renewal, which often took unexpected forms in living movements and made almost tangible the inexhaustible vitality of holy Church, the presence and effectiveness of the Holy Spirit".

What renewal Holy Father? What vitality? Sadly the Holy Father, as a peritus and an apologist at and of Vatican II, will never see clearly enough the destruction the Second Vatican Council, and its "spirit" has done to Holy Mother Church.

Long-Skirts said...

The Pope said:

"Anyone who considers the history of the post-conciliar era can recognize the process of true renewal..."

Oh, Holy Father...

BLACK
HOLES

Disco-decayed
They cancelled all color
Sanctuaries stripped
First Communions were duller.

No crinoline whites
Pale hues they stressed
Only pearled-Pharisees
Are ever so dressed.

Roses, carnations,
Flowers, all manners
Left just to wither
‘Gainst assertives’ beige banners.

Pillars of marble
Corinthian styles
They decided to paint
Like pink bathroom tiles.

Cassocks of red
Habits blue, white,
Robes of distinction
Extinct over night.

Missals with pages
Embossed in gloss-gold
Latin in tint
English-black often bold.

Even the ribbons
To mark scriptural prayers
Were of green, yellow, silvers
So to keep us from errors.

The soft votive flames
The red opaque glass
Gave an aura of stillness
Like time could not pass.

Yet time it passed
Vividness drained
And populations without color
Cannot be sustained.

So those underground
With red blood in blue veins
Birthed knowledge, the arts
Great virtues we've gained.

They did not decay-
God’s colors kept green
For the day up above
Once again to be seen.

Except for those beige
Banner-like-blind…
Gray fertility fades
In their black open minds.

Trouble Maker said...

With all due respect, the Holy Father can't have it both ways. What he seems to be saying is change he doesn't like is unacceptable, while change he likes is acceptable and challenges to those latter changes are unacceptable.

If the pronouncement by the Vatican in the 1950s by Cardinal Ottaviani and, by extended implication, Pope Pius XII regarding what was claimed to be immutable teaching on the Catholic State can be tossed out a mere 12 years later, hard to see what argument is to be used against today's dissenters regarding JPII's pronouncement on ordination. Today's dissenters can always claim that a future pope may come along who agrees with them, just as our 1950s dissenters didn't have to line up with Pope Pius XII but could bide their time and wait for Paul VI.

Ioannes said...

Sadly the Holy Father, as a peritus and an apologist at and of Vatican II, will never see clearly enough the destruction the Second Vatican Council, and its "spirit" has done to Holy Mother Church.

Yes because as we all know the Church existed in perfect harmony prior to Vatican II.

Tony said...

Until the Holy Father actually does something like excommunicating these heretical Austrian "priests" the rebellion will continue, in Austria and elsewhere.

John said...

Instead of putting the poor-mouth on the Holy Father, try to internalize what he has said. No good man could rightly deny that his call to the Radicalism of Obedience is salutary to the souls of us all. Obedience unto death, even death upon a cross!

W.C. Hoag said...

I would not be so quick to read here that our Holy Father is criticising traditionalists in general. Perhaps some but not all.

Think for a moment...Yes, there are some 1950s-style traditionalists (most common in anglo-saxon countries) who live in a milieu that leads to "the fossilization of traditions."

Yet most traditionalists and, especially, traditional religious communities reflect "the process of true renewal, which often took unexpected forms in living movements and made almost tangible the inexhaustible vitality of holy Church... [where] ...fresh currents of life burst forth and continue to burst forth...being filled with the joy of faith, the radicalism of obedience, the dynamic of hope and the power of love."

Tawser said...

And until a few years ago, one of those "living movements" that offered witness to "true renewal" would have been the Legionaries. Enough said.

Jonvilas said...

One should also notice one more sentence from the pope's homily. It goes as follows:
The saints show us how renewal works and how we can place ourselves at its service. And they help us realize that God is not concerned so much with great numbers and with outward successes, but achieves his victories under the humble sign of the mustard seed.

I.e. he explains quite well what he had in mind. Saints are the ones who make renewal, not the disobedient ones.

Frustrated Catholic said...

"Anyone who considers the history of the post-conciliar era can recognize the process of true renewal, which often took unexpected forms in living movements and made almost tangible the inexhaustible vitality of holy Church..."

Yeah right, like the heretical Neocatechumenal Way for instance?!

@Tony,
You're right, not only should those apostate "priests" be excommunicated but their like minded Archbishop also...Christoph Schonborn.

Bernonensis said...

I read the last two paragraphs of this piece quite differently. It seems to me that the Holy Father is saying that we should not seek to overturn traditions; Christ did it, but he is God, we're not. Far from being a lifeless relic of the past, the traditions of the Church make us a living organism and its fruits can be seen in the true renewal found in places where the traditions are honored and upheld, like, for example, Le Barroux, the FSSP and dare I say it, the SSPX.

Anonymous said...

Folks, we know this is disappointing. We know, once again, it feels like someone just punched you in the gut, that we've taken one step forward and 100 steps back, and any other metaphor we can mix in.

We will allow criticism of the Holy Father on the matter. However, we will not, ever, allow criticism of the person of the Holy Father, on his character or on his motives.

If anything, during this Holy Week, DOUBLE YOUR PRAYERS FOR HIM.

He's only human, and he needs them. The devil is strong and persistent, and there's no man on earth the devil has set his sights on, more than the Holy Father. The pressure we feel is nothing compared to the barrage of attacks our Holy Father undergoes every day.

Jordanes551 said...

. . . I have long ceased to take seriously whatever Benedict has to say. (emphasis added)

Taken literally, this means you have ceased to be meaningfully Catholic, or even meaningfully Christian.

Barona said...

So many posts have just confirmed the Holy Father's words on "fossilization of traditions".

St. Peter's little friend said...

We behold in the words of our Vicar of Christ the revelation of the spiritual journey the Holy Father is trodding:"...(Christ)lived out His task with obedience and humility all the way to the Cross, and so gave credibility to His mission. Not My will, but thine be done: these words reveal to us the Son, in His humility and His divinity, and they show us the true path."

With humility, let us adore Our Crucified Divine King - the Head of the Mystical Body...the Head of the Catholic Church - and beseech Incarnate Wisdom for the most merciful gift of His Holy Spirit to illumine and STRENGTHEN the priest He has elevated to the very highest position of His Church. Words such as quoted are necessary if Pope Benedict XVI is to then put step by step in His Master's Footprints.

"Veni Sancte Spiritus" for the journey of the Holy Father continues. . .

David said...

Anyone who considers the history of the post-conciliar era can recognize the process of true renewal, which often took unexpected forms in living movements and made almost tangible the inexhaustible vitality of holy Church, the presence and effectiveness of the Holy Spirit.

It's very sad when a Catholic must disagree with a Pope on something so simple as whether the last 45 years have witnessed a renewal in the Church or not.

But I'm afraid that I just don't see what the Holy Father sees. It's like someone telling you that it's a lovely sunny day and you look at the rain streaming down the window.

Adfero is right: we need to pray very much for the Holy Father.

Joan said...

Comment

Thank you for the posting!

This was spoken at the mass for the blessing of the oils to be used for the anointing in the Sacraments of Baptism, Confirmation, Holy Orders and Extreme Unction. So, the Pontiff, leader of the Roman Catholic Church Militant here on earth, in the process of preparing the “armaments” of grace ( if you will even in the making) gives a description of the battle scene now taking place. He is clear, concise and victorious.

He speaks about the individual soul; the actions of combat in the church militant battling selfishness and anarchy. Christ is the Person. He said He will be with us all days...even post Conciliar days.

Don’t think of the dishonorable persons of scandal that was yesterday ...spy Wednesday when Judas left Our Lord. Put this in the proper place in the time of the liturgy and it makes sense.

Grammar note: capitalize proper nouns and all references to God

Athelstane said...

Undoubtedly, the "living movements" that the Holy Father has in mind are the FSSP, the ICK, the Institut du Bon Pasteur, the FFI ...

Well, I joke - a little. There *have* been good things that have happened since 1965, they've just been traditional or very conservative in orientation, and they are, alas, like a few small green shoots in a vast landscape of cold tundra.

At any rate, I don't think the Pope is gunning for traddies here. If anything, he may be denying that traditionalism is fossilized, or is necessarily so. The real fire is aimed at the heretics in Austria (and beyond), and the press will rightly emphasize that. Now we just need disciplinary action to match his words.

It's time to bring these dissenters to heel.

Thinking outside the box said...

It's not what he meant, I suspect, but there's a certain truth to it. There has been renewal: in the several traditional societies that sprang up to defend tradition against the incursions of the modernists. If VII has had any good fruit at all, it is in reaction it inspired.

Peter said...

The kind of 'movements' that the Pope is referring to are "filled with the joy of faith, the radicalism of obedience, the dynamic of hope and the power of love." which certainly DOES NOT characterize the modernist post-conciliar movements but rather others such as Opus Dei, Legionaries of Christ (members not founder), Franciscans of the Immaculate, AND the TRADITIONALIST orders that have sprung up in the Church. These show that 'RADICAL OBEDIENCE'.

apstemp said...

I am truly interested in an objective list denoting the fruits of renewal since Vatican II.

We all know the list of damages, they are stated often enough. I would like to know from which perspective the "Fruits" could be known.

I can imagine, from the liberal perspective, such fruits as a more active role of women in the church, a greater openness and communication with other religions, and a greater recognition of human dignity with communion in the hand, and the limit upon kneeling.

These "Fruits," however, can be reasonably considered a non-fruit, or actually poisonous. Has the increase in women's participation been a positive thing or just the result of driving men out through the tendency demasculinize the liturgy and the priesthood? Has ecumenism resulted in the conversion of non-Catholics? Has it resulted in greater freedom for Catholics? Or has it watered down the faith of Catholics, while providing no benefit to the eternal welfare of other religions? Has the focus on human dignity increased our humane-ness and our compassion and generosity to our fellow man, or has it merely reduced our understanding and reverence for God, the Real Presence, human life, and has it eroded awareness and our horror of sin?

The places where one sees strength is in the more traditional aspects of the church, extraordinary form or not. This is also where the growth is. This is also where the conversions are.

I really, really want to understand these fruits, even if I don't agree with them. Without any understanding of what fruits they are referring to, these words have no more content than any politician's words. If the hierarchy cannot be clear about their meaning, then how can the faithful participate in this renewal. And, if this talk of fruits is meaningless, and just a CYA statement to cover Vatican II and the current state of the church, then this erodes the respect for the hierarchy of the church, from the parish priest up to the highest levels of Rome.

Are we getting wine or vinegar? And which one are we hoping to get?

Again, if anyone can give examples of the fruits of renewal, I am seriously interested in seeing them.

Dymphna said...

This is a little depressing. It's as if no matter what we do, we are wrong.

Mario Luigi said...

I don't mind him critiquing a "fossilization of traditions" but to hold up those problem ridden movements as a model is bizarre. They only fill a kind of void because of the collapse of regularly available, balanced Catholic life, especially in Europe. Neo Cats? Taize? New and dopey religious communities that pop up constantly with home-made habits while once great orders are so badly in need of reform.

Matt said...

Thinking outside the box said, "It's not what he meant, I suspect, but there's a certain truth to it. There has been renewal: in the several traditional societies that sprang up to defend tradition against the incursions of the modernists. If VII has had any good fruit at all, it is in reaction it inspired."

Good analysis.


OutsideObserver said, "Interesting. The Pope lashes out against Liberals and Traditionalists."

Yes, once again, mixed signals of the Holy Father. Where is he going with this? Are we going to see anything concrete regarding this next week, next month...? He has given so many admonitions since acceeding the Throne but to date... what? In humility let us admit to ourselves the Holy Father is good at the talk, not the walk.

Matt

thomas tucker said...

There is great vitality in the Church and mighty deeds being done even today. The Holy Father is quite correct. If your lips are pursed, your face frowning, and your heart frozen, then you won't see them.

Joaquín said...

Matt said: "In humility let us admit to ourselves the Holy Father is good at the talk, not the walk."

I disagree. In fact, I think is quite the opposite: The Holy Father is good at the walk, not the talk.

If we consider what he says ("the talk"), there's always some ambiguity, and sometimes His analysis of post-conciliar crisis is not what we would hope it would be. Not to mention his declarations concerning contraception last year...

But if we consider what he has done ("the walk"), we have concrete actions taken towards Tradition: the Motu Proprio, the lifting of excommunications of the SSPX, the doctrinal talks, and some others...

Yes, there are also "walks" not so laudatory, like the "approval" of the Neo-cathecumenal Way (which was NOT an approval of their liturgy...)...but, still, this Pope has proven more than any other Pope of the pos-conciliar era to be friendly to Tradition with concrete actions.

And "actions speak louder than words"...

Or, as we say in spanish, "obras son amores y no buenas razones"

Eugene said...

This Lent I've finally returned to the Catholic Church from Eastern Orthodoxy (I'm Russian). I know the Church is in crisis and there are many things at the highest level of the Catholic hierarchy that are out of control. But... but... let's pray for our Holy Father Benedict, "the sweet Christ on earth".

Timothy Mulligan said...

The Holy Father is talking about the "new movements." I am not so sanguine about them. Most if not all of them fall somewhere on the cult scale. Some of them, such as the Neocatechumenal Way, are heterodox (e.g., denying that the Mass is a sacrifice). To me, this bespeaks the predominance of the human element. These movements resort to human expedients to spread, emphasizing fundraising and numerical growth. Their survival mechanism is "radical obedience." The Holy Father sees the Holy Spirit. I see a cancer.

Kevin B. said...

Let's not blow things out of proportion. Yes, it's always disappointing to hear Churchmen - particularly the Holy Father - speak of the "renewal" of Vatican II without irony. Yes, the Holy Father could be doing more - it would be wonderful to hear those glorious words "anathema sit" come thundering forth from the papal throne again.

But in light of everything Pope Benedict has done for Tradition, I'm wiling to give him the benefit of the doubt if he won't speak critically the Council. John Paul the Great? As far as I'm concerned, when the Holy Father goes on to his eternal reward he deserves to be remembered as "Benedict the Great" just for Summorum Pontificum.

Xavier Rynne said...

I think the poor pope is tired. His comment here contradicts his own in the Ratzinger Report that the period following the Council has been "decidedly unfavorable" for the Church. I do think he has a personal investment in trying to see some silver lining in VII and that may be coming to the fore more later in his life. The consequences of admitting that it was a net negative for the Church are probably too much to bear with everything else he has on his plate.

Tradical said...

Hi All,

Just to chime in. I agree that the first highlighted portions are a rebuke to the revolt in Germany etc. I find it odd that the Pope has now been 'forced' to intervene where the local hierarchy has been (from where I sit) ineffective.

However I find the second portion confusing and ambiguous.

"... which often took unexpected forms in living movements ...
requires being filled with the joy of faith, the radicalism of obedience ..."

Fundamentally, the SSPX et al were definitely unexpected results of V2. They also contain radicalised elements with regards to obedience to the pre-V2 teaching of the Church.

The question would be how the Holy Father sees the Traditionalist Congregations - are they fossilised artifacts of the Pre-V2 era or are they full of vitality.

Either way, many prayers and sacrifices are needed as we enter the Triduum.

P^3

I am not Spartacus said...

I don't know how anyone can conclude that our Holy Father was referencing any particular group because he doesn't identify any particular group but I suspect he is in a bit of a quandary because when he was Prefect of The Sacred Congregation of the Doctrine of The Faith he exempted himself, and the entire Catholic Church, from previous Magisterial Decisions taken by Pre-V2 Popes (liberty and ecumenism) and also authoritative decisions taken by the Pontifical Biblical Commission.

When he was the head of the CDF he undermined the very authority he now seeks to defend.

It has to be a very weird experience for him.

And I want to confess that when it comes to Intelligence, knowledge, praxis, holiness, etc etc, Our Holy Father is a Sun and I am, at best, a spark form a flint strike, but the observations I made are not, I think, outside the pale.

This is a very weird time to be alive as a Catholic, especially to be alive as one who was born into the Catholic Church in 1948 and has seen all of these radical changes and introduction of uncountable novelties and yet there is this irrational expectation that I am expected to act as though the Catholic Church I was born into is the same Catholic Church existing today.

It is not; and everybody knows it - from atheists, to Jews, to Protestants, to Catholics born into the Church prior to 1952.

Matt said...

Tradical said, "The question would be how the Holy Father sees the Traditionalist Congregations - are they fossilised artifacts of the Pre-V2 era or are they full of vitality."

Well, we pray it's clear to the Holy Father when he looks at the Traditional communities. Where there is Tradition, there are the vocations, not the measley numbers at the average Diocesan seminaries. The SSPX is vibrant.

Look at here in Los Angeles. In a diocese of estimated 4-4.5 million Catholics and there are only about five or less per year being ordained for the Archdiocese, that alone speaks volumes.

To date, when a diocese embraces Tradition, vocations rise.

As Tradical said, many prayers and sacrifices are needed as we enter the Triduum.

Blessed Holy Thursday to all.

Matt

Kate said...

I think there is some serious misinterpretation of what the Pope is saying going on here.

The homily sets out to demolish a series of propositions often put forward by the liberals/progressives to justify disobedience.

He puts their arguments, then he responds to them.

One of their arguments is that the Church is defending and institutionalizing fossilized traditions. And he firmly rejects that claim.

I see no attack on traditionalists at all in this piece.

True he argues that Vatican II has had some positive effects. It would be surprising indeed if he suddenly took a new line on this!

Rather than seeing this as a potshot at the SSPX, perhaps we should remember that these dissenters are accusing him of 'betraying the vision of the Council' in his insistence that the Council should be interpreted, as far as possible, in the light of tradition, as one of the justifications for their dissent. This is a positioning statement, nothing more.

We should remember too that the Pope's consistent position, starting from that first speech to the Curia at that first Christmastime of his reign, is that the period immediately after a Council inevitably brings a period of confusion and heresy. He pointed to Nicaea, after which virtually all of the bishops in the world became Arians, the very thing the Council had condemned!

Yet in the longer term, once correct discernment and correction had worked their way through the Church, the doctrinal formulas and decisions of Nicaea did prove vital to the safeguarding of the Church.

The positive strands may be difficult to see at this point in history while we are still in the midst of the disarray.

But let's not dismiss the possibility out of hand!

And in the meantime, shouldn't we be focussing on the big positive of this homility: finally a clear cut denunciation of dissent on subjects such as the ordination of women!

Knight of Malta said...

What did Vatican II "renew"? Certainly Bugnini (mistakenly) thought the new mass was renewing something lost after the first centuries of the Church; but what, specifically, did Vatican II "renew"?

One can speak of a reformation, or a revolution, but not a renewal, because it renewed nothing.

A renewal is taking, say, a rusted car, and restoring it to new. I can renew my body, in a sense, by stopping the pastries, and working out.

Vatican II was a revolution in the Church; a coup d'état against the vetus ordo in favor of a modernist novus ordo (though I am not speaking strictly of the liturgy of the Church, that is certainly included).

Jan Baker said...

@Kate

"He pointed to Nicaea, after which virtually all of the bishops in the world became Arians, the very thing the Council had condemned!"

Not parallel: Vatican II did not condemn liberalism. The modernism we suffer today was introduced at Vatican II, point for point. The ecumenism comes from the first point highlighted in the Gleize response, that the Church was suddenly only one of others 'subsisting' in something greater, all partaking of the Truth, the Catholic Church admittedly more. That's what VII said. Every ill one could enumerate now, from lack of vocations to the homosexual plague, comes from the language of the Council. That was most certainly not true of Nicea!

Also, this quote from Kate:

"And in the meantime, shouldn't we be focussing on the big positive of this homility: finally a clear cut denunciation of dissent on subjects such as the ordination of women!"

Didn't it strike you in the Holy Father's actual words that in fact he does not give a clear denunciation of dissent on the ordination of women, but rather said the Austrian error was that they did not wish to wait for the usual and normal machinations of time and development--words to that effect, I am afraid I am on a different page now and can't get the actual quote, but I was struck by it first reading the post, that he did not clearly attack the error, but just the timing.

Anyway, sober reflections in this Triduum. The Passiontide psalms and today's lamentations of Jeremias, all so much about the betrayal of Our Lord by one close to Him, one who had broken bread with Him, His friend.

Kate said...

Jan,

Have you actually read the speech?!

What he said on the impossibility of the ordination of women was absolutely clear cut, with no suggestion whatsoever that any 'development' of doctrine or practice was available:

"Recently a group of priests from a European country issued a summons to disobedience, and at the same time gave concrete examples of the forms this disobedience might take, even to the point of disregarding definitive decisions of the Church’s Magisterium, such as the question of women’s ordination, for which Blessed Pope John Paul II stated irrevocably that the Church has received no authority from the Lord."

As for Vatican II and modernism, most people think it was around a lot earlier than VII! That the 'spirit of Vatican IIites' have been given an inch and taken a mile is surely evident by the fact that the erroneous interpretation you cite of 'subsists in' has actually formally been corrected by the Congregation of the Doctrine of the Faith (under then Cardianl Ratzinger!).

The Pope has worked consistently to correct such misinterpretations and we should give him credit for what he has achieved, even if we think he should be going in harder and faster.

Peterman said...

"He's only human, and he needs them. The devil is strong and persistent, and there's no man on earth the devil has set his sights on, more than the Holy Father."
Amen to that. It's Holy Week, lets pray for for the Holy Father .

The world eoonomy is simply too fragile to NOT have social upheavals in the coming years. Those social and societal changes will be reflected in the Church as well. I think Vatican 2 is a renewal of the Church. At the end (there will be an end) of Vatican II I have no doubts the Church will be fully renewed and restored.

Thomas Irenaeus said...

@Kate and @Jan Baker,

I have to agree with Kate on this one. There's a lot of misreading of the Holy Father's words today. Look at the quote:

... even to the point of disregarding "definitive" decisions of the Church’s Magisterium, such as the question of women’s ordination, for which Blessed Pope John Paul II stated irrevocably that the Church has received no authority from the Lord.

and I quote the word "definitive." It's pretty clear that His Holiness is clear, maybe not to everyone's liking, but nevertheless, clear. We should pray for unity so that those who are capable of bringing clarity to Holy Mother Church in these trying times can work from within in order to help this process of returning to our Sacred Tradition.

Ben Vallejo said...

You can't shoehorn Benedict into any liberal or traddie category!

As for WO, Benedict need not say more on what Paul VI and John Paul II have definitely said which should be considered infallible teaching. WO has caused the disintegration of the Anglican Communion and I am sure the Holy Father know it well after being bombarded with requests from distressed Anglicans.