Rorate Caeli

Farewell interview

Cardinal Castrillón Hoyos, President of the Pontifical Commission Ecclesia Dei, granted an interview to the largest Colombian daily, El Tiempo, which included the following:

And now, to what do you wish to dedicate yourself?

I will finish a book I have already begun on the ancient Gregorian Rite and the several conferences and seminars regarding this theme. And I will return to parish work, which is most gratifying.

And where will you live?

I will remain here in the Vatican. I remain a Cardinal, what happens is that I no longer have to "clock in". I will remain in Rome, but I will have more time to go to Colombia.

And how do you feel?

I am happy that the Lord has allowed me to reach this age in good health. I feel happy with the projects which I advanced. I do not think about the past quarter hour, I think of the upcoming quarter hour. One never retires who is comitted to Christ.

And what projects were these?

In Ecclesia Dei, I set three goals for myself, and I could accomplish them. First, that all priests of the world could be able to celebrate the Mass freely, that the ancient Rite were freed without opposition to the new one, and not being obligatory. Second, to make the richness of this rite known; and, third, to remove the excommunication of the Lefebvrian bishops, and to bring them closer to the Church once again.

How did the scandal due to this last issue end?

It was temporary, but it caused much damage. They (the Lefebvrians) were excommunicated because they were ordained without an authorization, not fot anything else. When the excommunication was lifted, the declarations, erroneous, of Bishop Williamson, who denied the Nazi Holocaust, appeared. But one thing was unrelated to the other.

It was speculated, at that moment, that the relation with the Pope was fractured...

Not at all! My relationship with the Holy Father has always been very good, and it remains so.


Thank you, dear Cardinal, for your great service to Holy Mother Church!

25 comments:

Peter said...

I set three goals for myself...

All these goals were the same as the SSPX's. Is it a coincidence?

First, that all priests of the world could be able to celebrate the Mass freely, that the ancient Rite were freed without opposition to the new one, and not being obligatory.

Let's hope that the next head of Ecclesia Dei will be at least as successful as Cardinal Hoyos, and as uncompromising as Paul VI.

Prodinoscopus said...

When the excommunication was lifted, the declarations, erroneous, of Bishop Williamson, who denied the Nazi Holocaust, appeared.

With all due respect to the Cardinal, has he researched the issue? On what basis does he DECLARE with certainty that Bishop Williamson's declarations were erroneous?

All fine and well for him to say that the two issues are unrelated, yet Bishop Williamson remains excluded from episcopal ministry because of his opinions regarding a politico-historical question.

It is sad to see Cardinal Castrillón Hoyos tangled up in this web of deceit. May God grant him a respite from the vipers' nest of Vatican politics.

Peter said...

Note "ancient Rite", "new one", instead of ordinary/extraordinary form.

Anonymous said...

Here we go again...

When the excommunication was lifted, the declarations, erroneous, of Bishop Williamson, who denied the Nazi Holocaust, appeared. But one thing was unrelated to the other.

Not even the Cardinal has a clue.

Anonymous said...

I pray his replacement will be just as vigorous and supportive of the 1962 Missal and its' restoration in ordinary parish life as well as a man dedicated to carrting out the Cardinal's dreams of reunification and full communion with the SSPX..Much will depend on style and diplomacy and from Cardinal Hoyos it will be tough to match. I pray for him another 20 healthy years and offer thanks for what he has done to heal the Church.

Anonymous said...

Interesting. The date of the interview is today and yet the departure has not been announced in the V.I.S. for today. He turns 80 tomorrow. There could be an announcement for tomorrow or Monday.

I note that one person who did retire today was Archbishop Francesco Monterisi, Cardinal Re's long-time Secretary of the Congregation of Bishops (for more than ten years). The Cardinal turned 75 in January; Monterisi, only last month. The Pope has not waited long to kick Monterisi upstairs: he has been appointed Archpriest of the Bascilica of St. Paul outside the Walls, a very prestigious honorarium. While his new honour is great, the importance of this change is enormous. The Pope has now appointed his own man, Archbishop Manuel Monteiro de Castro, to this key position, the one in which bishops are vetted for appointment. I would say that this new appointment is a major part of the Pope's refreshing of the curia. Monterisi was at least as important as was Ranjith in the curia.

As for Darío Cardinal Castrillón Hoyos, if his retirement is imminent, as the paper suggests, we shall likely see very soon if the Vatican will recognise a status for the S.S.P.X when it subsumes the P.C.E.D. in the C.D.F., something that will almost certainly coincide with the retirement. We might also see if there is some other final 'swan song' for the Cardinal, such as issuance of the clarification of S.P. or a structure for the Sons of the Holy Redeemer.

I thank the moderators of this blog for staying on their toes and finding the interview so quickly.

P.K.T.P.

Anonymous said...

Dear Moderators:

Keep your eyes peeled. I am wondering if the announcement of the subsumption of the P.C.E.D. is coming on a Saturday, when the V.I.S. does not publish.

P.K.T.P.

Anonymous said...

The Cardinal writes:

"third, to remove the excommunication of the Lefebvrian bishops, and to bring them closer to the Church once again."

Please note the conjunction "and" here. His Eminence feels it necessary to tack this on, to add this. In other words, he sought to do more than to lift the excommunications. He sought to "bring them closer to the Church once again".

Why add this unless it signifies something additional? Why tack it on to *complete* his sentence? It suggests to me that something more is coming. And that something must be a recognition or regularisation, at least temporary, of the S.S.P.X. What else could "bring them closer".

Again, the Cardinal will not be replaced. When he retires, his Commission gets subsumed in the C.D.F. What else will be announced on thst day, which now looms? Pray and remain vigilant. This Cardinal is no quitter. I'll let there's more to come.

P.K.T.P.

Anonymous said...

The Cardinal writes:

"third, to remove the excommunication of the Lefebvrian bishops, and to bring them closer to the Church once again."

Please note the conjunction "and" here. His Eminence feels it necessary to tack this on, to add this. In other words, he sought to do more than to lift the excommunications. He sought to "bring them closer to the Church once again".

Why add this unless it signifies something additional? Why tack it on to *complete* his sentence? It suggests to me that something more is coming. And that something must be a recognition or regularisation, at least temporary, of the S.S.P.X. What else could "bring them closer".

Again, the Cardinal will not be replaced. When he retires, his Commission gets subsumed in the C.D.F. What else will be announced on thst day, which now looms? Pray and remain vigilant. This Cardinal is no quitter. I'll let there's more to come.

P.K.T.P.

dcs said...

All fine and well for him to say that the two issues are unrelated, yet Bishop Williamson remains excluded from episcopal ministry because of his opinions regarding a politico-historical question.

Funny, but Bp. Fellay silenced him for the very same reason.

thetimman said...

Considering all the circumstances, Cardinal Castrillon did a fine job. Thanks to him and to all friends of tradition in Rome.

Anonymous said...

Considering all the circumstances, Cardinal Castrillon did a fine job. Thanks to him and to all friends of tradition in Rome.

- I certainly agree.

Congratulations Cardinal Hoyos for a job well done.

Bishop Williamson's statement was the most unfortunate and messed up everything. If only Williamson had not touched on the more controversial issues, then everything would have been more easier. (sigh)

Anonymous said...

Hmm. The new papal encyclical on economics and social justice is due out on 7th July, acording to all the witless pundits in the media; this is also the second anniversary of S.P. This timing is meant to appease B.S., Barry Soetero, alias Barak Obama (B.O.). B.S. will meet the Pope on the 12th.

I am wondering if the impending m.p. will come tomorrow or Monday while everyone is waiting for the economics encyclical. That seems more likely than a date between the 7th and the 12th, when anything on tradition could distract from the visit. And waiting until after the 12th would not make the Cardinal's exist very 'imminent'. We shall see.

P.K.T.P.

Paul Haley said...

Cardinal Hoyos has been a friend of Tradition and has done much for the cause but like P.T.K.P. I am not convinced that he will leave until the SSPX receives some sort of canonical status or, at the very least, temporary faculties. It would leave his assignment unfinished and the man who confronted Pablo Escobar is not a man who would leave this matter hanging. Even if he does leave physically, do not believe that his influence will not continued to be felt.

Thank you, Your Eminence, for all that you have done for us and for Holy Mother Church. Please keep us in your prayers.

Jordanes said...

The new papal encyclical on economics and social justice is due out on 7th July, acording to all the witless pundits in the media ***

And also according to the Vatican . . .

Jordanes said...

because of his opinions regarding a politico-historical question. ***

And because of what those opinions say about his fitness for episcopal ministry.

Anonymous said...

Dear Mr. Haley:

I agree with your assessment of Cardinal Castrillón Hoyos. However, sometimes, we reach a point at which we just can't do any more. I'm with you in praying that there is some form of recognition or regularisation coming together with the retirement of the Cardinal, and I do think that the Cardinal at least tried for this. At the same time, however, I have to believe that the retirement is imminent if only owing to the tenor of his answers to El Tiempo. But, of course, it's hard to say what 'imminent' means in Vaticanese. Bishop Fellay indicated on 15th June that the m.p. would, according to officials at the C.D.F., come by 20th June. We have now reached 3rd-4th July and still no m.p.

P.K.T.P.

Oliver said...

Once again, people believe Ecclesia Dei is some device to balance the excesses of the fast deteriorating conciliar church. Nothing of the sort; it is a device to capitalise on traditionalist successes in the world and to reclaim the old Latin Mass as her very own. The career of Hoyos as a Vatican fixer in this respect will fail with the SSPX. He has worked for the modernist agenda and is a creature of its political worldliness.

Anonymous said...

"The Pope has now appointed his own man, Archbishop Manuel Monteiro de Castro, to this key position, the one in which bishops are vetted for appointment. I would say that this new appointment is a major part of the Pope's refreshing of the curia. Monterisi was at least as important as was Ranjith in the curia."

Yes, he is Benedict XVI's appointment. But I also read yesterday something very shocking and horrible about this man, who is 71. Fortunatly he will not be a Cardinal, and this is probably his last posting.
What I read is that he has not spoken out against same-sex unions...but rather has said positive things about them. This is definitly NOT the kind of person that should be brought into the Vatican. He hasn't actually come out in favor of same-sex unions, but issuing any positive comment at all is a disgrace.

Anonymous said...

Today is July 4th, Card. Castrillón is now 80, no longer a Cardinal-elector, and the bolletino contains no mention of the Pope accepting his resignation as head of Ecclesia Dei for having reached the age limit.

Anonymous said...

Does this mean that the former Secretary of the Congregation for Bishops will get a red hat?

Archpriests of papal basilicas usually do.

New Catholic said...

Of course not. The age limit is 75, not 80. There is nothing mandating the retirement of Cardinal Castrillón as President of Ecclesia Dei at this moment; however, the Cardinal himself seems to expect this to happen very soon, as his answers make clear.

Prof. Basto said...

New Catholic,

The age limit for positions in the Roman Curia is 80. At 80, all Curial memberships cease.

Anonymous said...

New Catholic,

Just to clarify.

While Prefects and Presidents of Dicasteries tender their resignations at 75, membership in a Dicastery ceases at 80.

This is prescribed by art. 5 paragraph 2 of the Apostolic Constitution on the Roman Curia "Pastor Bonus".

So, yes, Castrillón tendered his resignation when he was 75 as Cardinal head of the dicastery, and it wasn't accepted yet, but now, having reached 80, Card. Castrillón passed another curial Milestone: the law requires that all his Curial memberships (not only his offices as head of dicastery) cease.

Of course, the Pope can dispense, etc.

§ 2. Once they have completed seventy-five years of age, cardinal prefects are asked to submit their resignation to the Roman Pontiff, who, after considering all factors, will make the decision. Other moderators and secretaries cease from office, having completed seventy-five years of age; members, when they have completed eighty years of age; those who are attached to any dicastery by reason of their office cease to be members when their office ceases.

New Catholic said...

Cardinal Castrillón Hoyos does not fall in any of these categories, since his is not a position of Prefect (though analogous), nor of moderator or secretary; nor of a mere member. He is the president of a Pontifical Commission; which is why several of the previous presidents of Ecclesia Dei did not immediately and automatically cease their functions on their eightieth birthdays, but only when Pope John Paul II accepted their resignations, several months after their birthdays.

As an example, Cardinal Felici's resignation, accepted almost one year after his eightieth birthday: here.

In any event, Pope Benedict should accept his resignation soon.

NC