Rorate Caeli

The Zapatero Government:
A horror story that never ends

Cerro de los Ángeles, Province of Madrid, 1936

After the approval of laws legalizing "express divorce" and abortion as a "right", on demand, and regardless of parental notification, the current Socialist government of Spain has urgent priorities (and, no, they are not new measures to rescue the Spanish Treasury from the brink of bankruptcy). Libertad Digital reports this Sunday:
... the Government has leaked to daily El País the draft of the Religious Liberty bill. ... It contains a total of 37 articles, among which are those related to several bans, selected by El País. According to this information, "religious symbols must not be displayed in public establishments and buildings, unless they are of artistic-historic, architectural, or cultural worth." ... "This means that, for instance, crucifixes will be removed from all public schools ... and from public buildings."

"Official acts and celebrations will not include religious ceremonies."
This Sunday, the Belgian elections should be a sign of the increasing support for independence in Flanders. The former Spanish Netherlands always had only one true unifying principle: a vigorous and firm Catholicism. The attempt to replace it with a mild Secular French identity under a very superficial Catholicity merely fostered resentment among the Dutch-speaking Flemish during the first century of the Belgian state. The vertiginous secularization of Belgian society following the Council has led to the inevitable result: Flemish Nationalism, of course, for, after the demise of their shared Catholic identity, what do Flemish and Walloons have in common? Flanders will in the end become independent - not now, but shortly.

The same will certainly happen in Spain, a diverse nation which was always held together by its festive and colorful, yet stern, Catholic identity. As the remains of Catholicism are expelled from the public square, the Flemish lesson will soon be learned. As the great Menéndez Pelayo famously said, "España será católica, o no será" ("Spain shall be Catholic, or shall not be.").

Spain ya no es, and a glorious chapter of the History of Christendom will soon come to an end.

27 comments:

Adeodatus said...

If it please Almighty God, may the FET y de las JONS somehow return to power in Spain, restoring her Catholic decency and ridding her of the demons of Liberalism and Marxism.

Holy Martyrs of the Spanish Civil War, pray for us.

Jordanes said...

Why is Socialism legal in Spain? When will Spain be healed of its blindness and indolence that allows this cadre of wickedness to destroy a once great kingdom?

John McFarland said...

Adeodatus,

As a historical matter, the "right" and the "left" were originally the two wings of the National Assembly in France -- that is, the two wings of the Revolution; and it has become the universal paradigm in what used to be Christendom.

And since the left is high-octane Revolution and the right low-octane, sooner or later the left gets its way.

I know absolutely nothing about Spanish politics, but I don't have to. I know what's set out in the previous paragraphs; and so I know the game in Spain, and how it will end.

In politics, Catholic traditionalists have two choices: real enemies and false friends.

Unless and until there are enough real Catholics to influence politics, it's a complete sucker game for the likes of us.

In politics as everywhere else, there is only one strategy: seek first the kingdom of heaven and its justice.

Anonymous said...

The photo at top leaves no doubt, "At least the commies know Who they are fighting." Some charitable Catholic should tell them that they cannot win. Unfortunately, it is in our time that Mt 24:12 is too true, " and the charity of many shall grow cold." Catholics are the salt of the earth, but if the salt should lose it's savor, it is good for nothing but to be thrown out and trampled on by men. Which is exactly what is happening. Vive Christo Rey!!! Fight children of Light, Fight!!! (Our Lady of La Salette)

Anonymous said...

Mr. McFarland,

The "FET-JONS", or "Falange Española Tradicionalista y de las Juntas de Ofensiva Nacional-Sindicalista" was a ruling organization uniting all Francoist political forces in Franco's Spain. It was not a political party in the sense of liberal democracy. But it was truly Catholic, to an extent unimaginable today.

"I know absolutely nothing about Spanish politics, but I don't have to."

Of course you don't have to, but I encourage you to investigate the matter of Franco's Spain (and the disastrous effect Vatican II had on it), as it is interesting, instructive and edifying.

Oliver said...

Well, we know the conciliar church has helped to undermine the confessional state everywhere. And now the secular state closes in for the kill. And national hierarchies will assist in their own demise The rot started at the top in Rome. One by one the dominoes are falling.

John McFarland said...

Anonymous 14:35,

It's been many years since I've read Gironella. But when I think of the Falange, I still think of Ignacio Alvear's crack to his Falangist buddy that he's known him for three years and still doesn't understand what a vertical syndicate is.

My own view of the Civil War and thereafter is rather a cynical one. In its characteristic papalist fashion, the Spanish hierarchy yearned for detente with the Reds in accordance with the line established by the Vatican in 1926 with the condemnation of Action Francaise. Father Vallet was effectively run out of Spain, and the boosting of Father Escriva began. It is no accident that Maritain's Integral Humanism grew out of lectures he gave in Spain just as the Civil War was beginning.

Unfortunately, it was initially difficult to achieve detente with those who killed six thousand priests. So the hierarchy didn't have much choice but to go along with Francoism, a military dictatorship cum cult of personalitiy whose leader, although of a liberal family, also saw difficulties in detente with the murderers of six thousand priests.

Franco paid as much attention to the Falange as he found useful. The Falange found it useful to pretend that the Franco regime was built on its principles. Ecen Opus Dei, the laicism to end all laicism, didn't see much choice but to fawn on Franco while pushing for reform behind the scenes. Exactly how Catholic the whole enterprise was I really am in no position to judge, but I am skeptical. That it was superior to priest-murdering anarchy on the road to Sovietization I have no doubt, and am grateful to Franco.

It is certainly right that Vatican II cut the heart out of Catholic Spain. By 1967 Monsignor Escriva, far out on the "right" of the Vatican II supporters, was telling the devotees of his sanctified secularism, and at Mass no less, how he was "passionately in love with the world," and whining about how the government was not financial supporting his University of Navarre despite all the wonderful things it was doing for secular society.

Anonymous said...

Mr. McFarland,

the original Falange movement, which had its unfortunate revolutionary trace, was the "extreme left" wing of FET-JONS. They were not dominant.

Franco of course wasn't a hardliner, and he was ridiculed for being hopelessly soft by Jose Antonio Primo de Rivera, but you can't be a hardliner if you want to unite political forces as different as those who opposed the Communists. And he was doing it with success for nearly 40 years.

Of course the unfortunate trends that have ultimately prevailed were present all the time, but with all its flaws Franco's Spain was a Catholic state beyond doubt. Nearly 90% of schools and nearly 80% of publishing houses were under Church control, not to mention other privileges, like the fact that hierarchs were members of all important state organs or prohibition of public cult of all other religions.

John McFarland said...

Anonymous 20:47,

I think that you're basically right. Whatever his flaws, Franco was part of the solution, not part of the problem. Hence the energetic efforts of the Reds to efface all traces of his regime.

New Catholic said...

Hey, "Belgian", are you a Flemish or a Walloon?... Or a bruxellois francophone?...

Your heated comment will not be posted here, no matter how many times you may try. If you wish to respond to that argument in the post (which is not about Belgium at all, but about what a largely post-Catholic Belgium may teach us about Spain), please do so in a polite and informed manner, and not by saying that "your country" is somewhat off-limits.

NC

Anonymous said...

"Holy Martyrs of the Spanish Civil War, pray for us."

Adeodatus, I am sure you would love to see a new civil war in Spain in order to retain the churchs' privileges, don't you?


"Unless and until there are enough real Catholics to influence politics, it's a complete sucker game for the likes of us."

John McFarland, you are forgetting that Spain's Prime Minister is Catholic and he is received by the pope wearing his stole.

Jordanes said...

Ted Kennedy was a Catholic too, Anonymous. Nancy Pelosi is a Catholic.

If Zapatero is a Catholic, then let him abjure his socialist errors and accept the teachings of the Church, and work to undo the many grievous evils he has introduced over the past few years. Unless he does that, his faith, if he has any, is in vain.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous 14:27 said:
"Franco of course wasn't a hardliner, and he was ridiculed for being hopelessly soft by Jose Antonio Primo de Rivera, but you can't be a hardliner if you want to unite political forces as different as those who opposed the Communists. And he was doing it with success for nearly 40 years."

You seem to ignore that Primo de Rivera was executed by the republicans at the beginning of the Civil War, so he could not have expressed that Franco was soft, except before the Civil War started.
Also the Falange movement that José Antonio promoted was very different from italian fascism, but took that name inspired in a military discipline with the purpose of renewing Spain and was an exclusive national movement.
Primo de Rivera was very highly regarded by Franco, and the proof is that he wanted his tomb to lay beside that of P. de R. when he was interred at the Monument for the Fallen.
Charles

Anonymous said...

"If Zapatero is a Catholic, then let him abjure his socialist errors and accept the teachings of the Church, and work to undo the many grievous evils he has introduced over the past few years. Unless he does that, his faith, if he has any, is in vain."

The pope believes that Zapatero is a Catholic. Whose fault it is?

Adeodatus said...

Quoth Anonymous 17:42
"Adeodatus, I am sure you would love to see a new civil war in Spain in order to retain the churchs' privileges, don't you?"

I'd love to see the Marxists give up their evil ideology and follow Christ. Or else that they all be turned into pillars of salt. Or simply be voted out of office. A struggle of arms to end the Satanic evil of abortion in Spain, and the other evils of the Socialists, who appeal to the base and deluded, is a distant fourth. But if it were necessary, then why should any good man in the whole world oppose it?

Or shall Spain become a charnel house of dead babies like so many other lands? You see it is not only the "church's privileges" that I'm advocating... but mankind's.

Viva Cristo Rey!

Jordanes said...

The pope believes that Zapatero is a Catholic. Whose fault it is?

Whose fault is what? Being Catholic is not a fault -- it's exactly the opposite of a fault. Do you mean the pope is mistaken about believing that Zapatero is a baptised Catholic? Or that Zapatero is mistaken about believing that he himself is a baptised Catholic?

Zapatero certainly is at fault for his rejection of of the Church's teachings. The pope could also be faulted for not more forcefully correcting Zapatero for his assaults on the Church and on the people of Spain.

Anonymous said...

"Do you mean the pope is mistaken about believing that Zapatero is a baptised Catholic? Or that Zapatero is mistaken about believing that he himself is a baptised Catholic?"

Both! By the way just because Zapatero was baptized catholic does not mean he believes he is catholic. Zapatero obviously does not like the Church, so I wonder if it is possible to be a catholic and hating the church, millions of catholics hate the Church. Even Joseph Ratzinger is very critical of the Church.

Jordanes said...

Do you have a point, Anonymous?

Anonymous said...

Jordanes, yes is it possible to be a catholic and hate the Church?

shane said...

I almost invariably support separatist movments throughout Europe. And while I believe Flemish independence would be good for the Flemish people, I'm not so sure it would be good for the European Union, which is one of my main concerns. Brussels, which is the capital of the EU, is historically part of Flanders, even though it has a French speaking majority. When, or if, independence happens, there will certainly be a dispute over partition and it could have a hugely destabilizing impact on the EU institutions.

Anonymous said...

The European Union has selected the Tower of Babel as its logo. If that is not a direct challenge to God, what is? The EU will go the way of Babel. "Put not your trust in princes." (Ps. 145:2) http://www.traditioninaction.org/History/G_009_OldNewBabel.html

shane said...

The EU's logo is not the Tower of Babel, though there is an urban legend that the Parliament in Strasbourg was designed according to Pieter Bruegel's painting.

The real EU logo is the Flag, which honours the Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary.

I also don't accept that the EU will be going away anytime soon.

Jordanes said...

Is it possible to be a catholic and hate the Church?

Yes, it is possible -- not a good or faithful Catholic, however.

As I mentioned above, it's meaningless to say "Zapatero is a Catholic and he has met the Pope," since it's clear that Zapatero does not accept the teachings of the Catholic Church.

Criticism of the Church doesn't necessarily indicate hatred of the Church -- but Zapatero's efforts to hinder and harm the Church in Spain go far beyond criticism.

Anonymous said...

"Urban legend"? Just compare them here. http://www.traditioninaction.org/History/G_009_OldNewBabel.html You will also find the poster advertisement for the EU actually showing the Tower and the 11 pentagrams with the words, "EUROPE: MANY TONGUES ONE VOICE".

shane said...

That's just a case of them playing to a long-established myth for promotional purposes. It's not intended to be serious. Likewise the café in the Parliament is called after Babel and some locals informally call it the Tower of Babel, which is its nickname. None of that proves the EU Parliament was actually designed after that painting.

There are other inaccuracies in the TIA article, like blaming the "European Parliament" for "approv[ing] of a law obliging Italy to remove the Crucifix from the walls of its public schools". That was the European Court of Human Rights, an appellate of the Council of Europe (of which Turkey and Russia are members), and it was a judicial ruling, not a 'law'.

Anonymous said...

Yes, it is possible -- not a good or faithful Catholic, however.

Jordanes, to me it is completely incomprehensible that a person could call he or she a catholic and despise or hate the church, but it happens a lot, even among the clergy (bishops and cardinals including). In this case the most honest thing to do would be to recognize that they are not catholic, after all thank God we live in the times when being a catholic does not determine the fate of a person. (Let's give thanks to God for Religious Freedom).

Anonymous said...

shane, Like the Tower of Babel, the EU is being built against the will of God. Any organization which promotes abortion and sodomy as "rights" cannot last. That would include the good old US of A.