Rorate Caeli

The next pope and the Latin Mass

Out of the 118 (117 on February 28, date of the vacant see) cardinal-electors (cardinals under 80), 12 of these men have offered the traditional Latin Mass following the introduction of the novus ordo.  This group ranges from cardinals who offered one or two traditional Latin Masses before being named cardinal to Cardinal Burke offering more Pontifical High Masses than we can even keep track of.  Several other cardinals have assisted in some way at traditional Latin Masses without publicly offering one themselves, and several cardinals over 80 have offered traditional Latin Masses.

  
The following is our current list (after much research, but open to corrections) of the cardinal electors who have offered at least one public traditional Latin Mass as a cardinal or bishop in the past four decades. The list does NOT include those who merely attended a traditional Latin Mass, Vespers, Benediction, Te Deum, etc: 

Philippe Cardinal Barbarin
Raymond Cardinal Burke
Carlo Cardinal Caffarra
Antonio Cardinal Cañizares Llovera
Velasio Cardinal De Paolis
George Cardinal Pell
Albert Malcolm Cardinal Ranjith
Jean-Pierre Cardinal Ricard
Franc Cardinal Rodé
Juan Cardinal Sandoval Íñiguez
John Cardinal Tong Hon
André Cardinal Vingt-Trois


Pope Benedict XVI, as Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger, was in this category during the 2005 conclave.  Perhaps Benedict XVII, or even Pius XIII, is one of the above 12 to continue the liturgical restoration.

Note (NC): This is not a list of "trad Cardinals", nor a list of "trad-friendly" Cardinals, as it was mistakenly presented in some venues, as Le Forum Catholique. It is simply a list of the current electors who have, to the author's knowledge, publicly celebrated the Traditional Mass following the introduction of the Novus Ordo (or ever, for those ordained after it). This is why Cardinals Betori - who celebrated a Te Deum in Gricigliano, but no Mass - and Antonelli are not part of the list, for instance. 

64 comments:

  1. My money is on "Benedict XVII." I think it'd be a bit odd if the pope didn't take the name of the living ex-pope.

    Let's just hope for no "Paul VII"....

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  2. From what I understand Cdl Arinze is no friend to Tradition or the Holy Mass.

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  3. Both of these cardinals are from the USA correct? No way will they be elected Pope, nor should they be. Nor should any Bishop or Cardinal in the Church today. Not ONE acknowledges a severe CRISIS or would do anything about it! Cardinals want to save the Church? Appoint Bishop Fellay and watch the faith return by millions! The truth is infectious.

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  4. Forgive me if this is a stupid question, but it might put my mind at ease:

    Can my local Ordinary, on Feb 28 at 8:01pm (Rome time) decree that Summorum Pontificum (and Universae Ecclesiae) no longer have any force of law in his Diocese since the highest authority of these documents is only "motu proprio" from a person who is no longer Pope?

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  5. Yes, I am blessed to have assisted at Holy Mass offered by Cardinal Pell here in Ireland and have a video of it. Wouldn't it be wonderful if this number could be doubled in the years to come...

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  6. To Marko:

    A Motu proprio is called 'motu proprio' because it is written on the pope's own initiative ('motus'), not as a result of a petition.

    It is, like all papal documents, valid until the pope of the day decides differently.

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  7. Card. Di Nardo is another not on your list here.

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  8. @Marko: Interesting question

    Universæ Ecclesiæ wasn't a motu proprio; it was an instruction from Ecclesia Dei with Pope Benedict XVI's approval.

    Also, no pope can abrogate what Tradition has passed onto us.

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  9. Marko, my understanding of litterae apostolicae such as Summorum Pontificum and UE is that they do not contain expiration dates and, as such, require a contrary act issued by a competent authority to revoke them. So a subsequent pope would have to issue a similar letter or action stating that SP and UE are no longer good law or something to that effect.

    So to answer your question, no. It's the same reason JPII's letters on the TLM weren't null upon his death.

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  10. Okay okay... we've got a 1 in 10 shot at this folks

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  11. Ken has conducted extensive research, Alan. That other list has many errors or wishful-thinking exaggerations. And it includes those who were merely PRESENT at celebrations (which is pretty good, but not what this list is about).

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  12. Alan Aversa -- the Acción Litúrgica list seems to include any cardinal in the neighborhood during a traditional Latin Mass. I wish even half of the American cardinals listed there actually offered a TLM. Ken

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  13. RE: Sandra P.
    You said "From what I understand Cdl Arinze is no friend to Tradition or the Holy Mass."

    I am not sure that this is correct. The Cardinal celebrated the TLM at my parish a year or so ago and he indicated that he had an appreciation of the Mass stemming back to his early days as a priest. Furthermore, Cardinal Arinze turned 80 on November 1, 2012 and thus will not be allowed to vote for the next Pope.

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  14. We removed Cardinal Arinze from the earlier list of 12, now 11. Sorry about that -- the cardinal does not look 80! Ken

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  15. IMHO, I understand that a papal decree "moto proprio" is an exercise of the Ordinary Magisterium of the Church - and therefore infallible, irreformable teaching.

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  16. Dear thouArt,

    I remember during the waning years of the John Paul II pontificate that it was said there would never be a German or American elected pope.

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  17. Marko asked, "Can my local Ordinary, on Feb 28 at 8:01pm (Rome time), decree that Summorum Pontificum (and Universae Ecclesiae) no longer have any force of law in his Diocese since the highest authority of these documents is only "motu proprio" from a person who is no longer Pope?"

    Marko, no, your Ordinary is incorrect. As Lautensack said above, until a succeeding Pope decrees otherwise, all Motu Proprios are Papal Prerogatives and become the force of law and no one in the Church has the right or the ability to decide otherwise whether or not the decreeing Pope "disappears from the scene."

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  18. Is it correct to say Cañizares is the only real possibility from that list?

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  19. As will be brought out more extensively in the future, the grave injury that the SSPX have caused the Holy Pontiff was a significant factor in his decision to resign. The wound the SSPX inflicted ran very deep, and most certainly took a great toll on his health.

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  20. This is not a list of "trad Cardinals", nor a list of "trad-friendly" Cardinals, as it was mistakenly presented in some venues, as Le Forum Catholique - by those who clearly have reading comprehension problems and cannot understand a simple, plain, objective, and non-editorial text in English. It is simply a list of the current electors who have, to our knowledge, publicly CELEBRATED the Traditional Mass following the introduction of the Novus Ordo (or ever, for those ordained after it).

    NC

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  21. FWIW, I would think calling oneself "Benedict XVII" while Benedict XVI is still alive would be awkward.

    Were the next pope to take "John Paul III" or "Paul VII" or "John XXIV" might be seen as a commentary on Benedict; I doubt any would do that.

    So I expect someone to do as Benedict did: dust off a name not used in awhile. How about Gregory (not sure of the number)? Or how about Marcellinus II (after the last pope to be martyred)? Or Clement? Get the Jesuits worried.

    As far as the motu proprio: I wouldn't worry about the next pope suppressing it or interfering with it. Even if he doesn't like Summorum Pontificum, it would be needless trouble to mess with it. He will simply ignore it.

    That's why I think SP will prove to be Benedict's greatest legacy; he has already set in motion a significant change in the Church, but it won't happen overnight; it will happen over time. And it's already in motion, and would be a headache to stop.

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  22. tom :

    I think it'd be a bit odd if the pope didn't take the name of the living ex-pope

    Not a single case of a successor taking the same name as the abdicant Pope can be found.

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  23. How favorable is Cardinal Bertone to the TLM? Because this will determine what you're likely to see when he becomes Pope.

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  24. Every single Cardinal in the Church today, without exception, attended the Latin Mass at least through high school. Most of them offered the Latin Mass as younger priests up until the age of 35 or so.
    As priests, they clearly understood all of implications involved in changing over 70% of the Mass.

    Believe it or not, there were many priests who left the priesthood rather than say the English Mass. Then there are the priests who tried to find some accommodation to continue saying the Latin Mass, like Abp. Lefebvre, Father James Wathen, Father Leonard Feeney, Father Malachi Martin, and others.
    These men suffered very much for the Faith. The debt we owe to the priests who kept the Liturgical Tradition alive in the darkest hours is incalculable. They all paid a heavy price.

    The current College of Cardinals had no such pangs of conscience, even being fully aware of the words of St. Pius V (Quo Primum) written in the front of every altar Missal, and comprehending the changes to the Faith the New Mass codified.

    It is completely unrealistic to expect that one single member of this group of men, all in their declining years, would suddenly decide that they were doing the wrong thing for the past 40+ years.

    Promoting a Mass that they all believed to be antiquated and inferior to their new invention would indicate that they didn't do the right thing back in 1969, that the Church didn't do the right thing. It implies that their entire lives have been lived in error. They are NEVER going to do that.

    You might get a small biscuit thrown out once and awhile, but no current member of the clergy is going to encourage a return to Tradition. Traditional anything is viewed as "devisive" by the overwhelming majority of those in power.

    As Father Malachi Martin (a Jesuit in good standing until his death) stated: "all the priests who are conservatives have been outed and ousted."

    It's obvious that it doesn't really matter which of the Cardinals they elect, the overall orientation will remain the same, and the effect on the Liturgy will be minimal.

    Think about it; there are many who consider Pope Benedict to be a conservative. What does that say.

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  25. Ranjith actually ticks a lot of the boxes. He's youngish, has pastoral and diplomatic experience, is fluent in ten languages.

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  26. @ Catherine of Siena:

    Yes, the thought had occurred to me, given the profoundly impressive public defenses of the SSPX position during the discussions, that the wounds might be very deep indeed.

    It must be a terrible thing for a conciliar Father to survey the vineyard at this awful moment.

    May these wounds become efficacious unto the salvation of the soul of the Holy Father, and unto the unity of the Church in Truth.

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  27. Father Fox:

    Thank you for your commentary re: S.P. Your opinion strikes me as being rooted in logic. I take great comfort in the probability of a modernist stirring up a hornet's nest being remote.

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  28. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  29. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  30. I know some sedevacantists who are hoping the next pope will call himself John XXIII or Paul VI ;)

    For candidates, I'm hoping for Burke or Ranjith. I've been looking online to see what languages Burke knows but cannot find out.

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  31. Judith's comment struck a chord in me. It has a lot of truth, if not complete truth. I miss Fr Martin's intelligence and his take on all of these developments. He was a great intellect and servant of God.

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  32. Cardinal Ranjith in my book is the best and perhaps truly only hope for those who love Tradition, and the liturgical direction set out by our current Holy Father. Whoever comes next, unless it is Ranjith, will not likely have the liturgical sensitivity and acumen of Benedict XVI. Maybe Pell would, I don't know. We have lived in a glorious light under Benedict XVI. These have been beautiful days. I pray for the Holy Father and his successor and Mons. Guido Marini, who may or may not have a future in the Vatican, and if not, he may suffer at the hands of the petty and the jealous. He is a hero too.

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  33. Cardinal Arinze is over 80 years old. The next pope will be under the age of 70. If the college wants an African, it will be Cardinal Turkson.

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  34. I've seen in many places this notion put forth that "there won't be an American Pope" without explanation as if it's self evident. The only thing close to an explanation offered is that America, for now, retains the status of super power by virtue of her military and economic strength (waning as it may be by design but that's irrelevant here).

    I'm not saying His Eminence Burke will be our next Pope but I would like to know why the very possibility should be dismissed out of hand.

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  35. Is it ok to post a link to this interesting, and I think, important article here?

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/13/world/europe/constant-drumbeat-hastened-the-popes-exit.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

    ‘Constant Drumbeat’ Sped the Pope’s Exit

    For once, I believe the media, and of all publications, The New York Times, got it 100% right about the Church. And they discuss the real reason why the Pope is abdicating. A great article, I think.

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  36. RC: I'm not the one who wrote the statement below as I have never written about sede-vacantists in such a perjorative manner. To that, since I'm the first Matt on this board, he should designate himself as something else.


    False Matt said, I know some sedevacantists who are hoping the next pope will call himself John XXIII or Paul VI ;)"

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  37. JTLiuzza said, "I'm not saying His Eminence Burke will be our next Pope but I would like to know why the very possibility should be dismissed out of hand."

    JTLiuzza, the reason being is because of the very facts you mentioned above. The body-politic of the Church doesn't want the assocation nor the possible influence (perceived or otherwise) an American Pope would have on the Church, especially in relation to the foreign policy of this country. There it is in a nutshell, albeit a very small one.

    (The Orig Matt, not the one who took a swipe at the sede-vacantists and the nerve to say it was me.)


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  38. I certainly hope since the Electors know when the Holy Father *isn't going to be any longer,* they will be ready to ready to GO on Feb. 28, so that the Interegnum will be as short as possible. Prayers.

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  39. Thanks Matt for responding. My difficulty is in conceding that the election of Pontiff is solely a political decision, which it seems to me the "no American Pope" folks take as a given. I'm not naive enough to think that worldly politics won't have any influence on the coming conclave, but I wonder where the Holy Ghost figures in such thinking and how the foreign policy of the USA can somehow be connected to a Cardinal of the Catholic Church.

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  40. mfg said

    Matt, i.e., the original Matt: it was I.

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  41. Matt (of the strict observance)Wednesday, February 13, 2013 at 6:34:00 AM GMT

    I think Cardinal Burke could be a realistic choice. Once you are elected Pope you get a new nationality.

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  42. Fr Martin Fox said...

    "That's why I think SP will prove to be Benedict's greatest legacy; he has already set in motion a significant change in the Church, but it won't happen overnight; it will happen over time. And it's already in motion, and would be a headache to stop."

    I think the most lasting legacy of PBXVI's pontificate will be his resignation. And I don't say that with disrespect for other accomplishments. It is just something that Benedict XVI has chosen on his own.

    With all due respect Father, but I don't see it as a major accomplishment to grant to the Church that which it has never lost and will always have, the TLM.

    BTW, I am not and have never been a follower of SSPX.

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  43. Is there much reason to believe if the Pope receives an outpouring of requests to remain Pope that he could reverse his decision? And what if the conclave reelects him?

    He could say he was inspired to step aside. But the cardinals could say the Spirit led us to you again. And is it likely you're the only one who is right and all of us and the Spirit wrong? The people also want you to return as Pope.

    Please is there any leader in the Church who could start a total Church effort to plead with the Pope to stay on?

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  44. These were a beautiful eight years. Summorum Pontificum will stay and few good bishops will help create centers liturgical excellence. However, we must be prepared for the pendulum to swing. The TLM might not be viewed by the Conclave as the way to go, as we do. The SSPX fiasco will not be easily forgotten.

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  45. Dear @Frd,

    a motu proprio is, first of all, legislation. It can also contain teaching. If so, it is an exercise of the Ordinary Magisterium of the Church. But by no means infallible; infallible is, within the Ordinary Magisterium, only what the whole episcopal college in at least virtual unison have pronounced as binding.

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  46. I am not crazy about Peter Turkson and maybe this is why:

    Turkson says : "It would certainly mean a lot if I had to be a pope," he said. "If I was elected pope it would signal a lot of [personal] change. Very big change in a lot of regards. I have been an archbishop, which involved a certain amount of leadership and now having to do this on a world level, the dimensions expand almost infinitely.

    "It is going to be a life-changing experience and I think that is what it has been for Benedict and those who have gone before us. The challenge will also be with the individual to want to make his mark, not trying to fit into anybody's shoes but finding his own shoes to wear."


    He seems far from humble.

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  47. judith
    malachi Martin wasn't "a Jesuit in good standing until his death" he left the jesuit order in 1964 released from his vows and moved to new york.

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    Replies
    1. Can you be a "Jesuit" in good standing? Lol.

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  48. Raymond Leo XIV Burke for me! And I am no American!

    Éireannach

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  49. Not that he should be added to the list, but Cardinal Allencherry, the Syro-Malabar Major Archbishop, has long been supportive and friendly to adherents of the traditional Roman Rite. Obviously, he belongs to a different Rite himself and thus has not offered Mass in the traditional Roman Rite, but I am hopeful that he will be part of a more tradition-friendly "voting bloc" of cardinals.

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  50. Malachi Martin was a Jesuit in good standing until his death. Father O'Keefe, S.J. stated this upon his death.

    On Turkson, yes I saw that article and it was extremely bad form. He sounded immature. You NEVER campaign for the papacy.

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  51. Tradition will likely suffer, but not be openly attacked, under a new Pope. How a new Pope views Vatican II issues (the understanding of which may be one of the headaches that drove Benedict out), and addresses the SSPX future, are key to understanding how he will view Tradition. The Latin Mass needs to become the central mass of the Church again, as do the Traditional sacraments. Benedict resigning left undone his "reform of the reform" of the liturgy, but it cannot be ignored by the next pontiff. The present circumstances where one nation is different from another, and, in America, one diocese from another, shows the growing reality of two distinct Catholic Churches.

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  52. JB said, "Malachi Martin was a Jesuit in good standing until his death."

    Did Martin leave the priesthood after all or didn't he? If so, how did he remain in good standing?

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  53. Does anyone know what languages Cardinal Burke can speak? It seems that modern popes have set the trend to know quite a few. If Burke only knows English & Latin, he has about zero odds of becoming pope.

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  54. Does anyone know what languages Cardinal Burke can speak? It seems that modern popes have set the trend to know quite a few. If Burke only knows English & Latin, he has about zero odds of becoming pope.

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  55. I should have said remained a priest in good standing. He was never released from his vow of chastity and was permitted to say Mass.

    "In 2004, Father Vincent O'Keefe S.J., former Vicar General of the Society of Jesus and a past President of Fordham University, stated that Martin had never been laicized. O'Keefe stated that Martin had been released as a religious from all his vows—poverty and obedience—save the vow of chastity.[46] Martin no longer was a Jesuit but remained a (secular) priest during the rest of his life."

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  56. As I recall, during an interview for Triumph communications, Fr. Malachi Martin emphaticaly stated that he was Secularized, not Laicized. Being secularized means that he remained a priest, but was released from his vows to the Jesuits, and would hence no longer be a Jesuit, although still a priest.

    Paleothomist

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  57. Keith Cardinal O'Brien has assisted at the first mass of Fr Simon Harkins (FSSP) 5 June 2010 at his own Edinburgh Cathedral.

    (see Transalpine Redemptorists blog for this date with an impressive set of photos)

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  58. Cardinal Burke speaks English, French, Latin and Italian to my knowledge. I don't know of any other languages. Maybe someone else can fill in the gaps

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  59. When I said that Malachi Martin was a "Jesuit in good standing," I intended to highlight the fact that he had Jesuit formation, which is the most rigorous of any religious order. It begins before the novitiate and lasts more than 10 years. At his request, He was releaved of his vows (to God, not to the order) of poverty and obedience. He asked for this specifically because he did not agree with the changes of Vatican II. He continued to offer the Latin Mass daily in his private chapel, heard confessions, and performed marriages until his death. My comments about Father Malachi Martin are quite tangential to the point of my earlier remarks.

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  60. "Keith Cardinal O'Brien has assisted at the first mass of Fr Simon Harkins (FSSP) 5 June 2010 at his own Edinburgh Cathedral."

    How many times do we have to repeat that the list is about those who have PERSONALLY OFFERED the TLM? It is easy enough to simply attend one or two TLM's, or to preside over a short ceremony such as a Te Deum or a Benediction.

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  61. HE Cardinal O'Brien had Edinburghs Cathedral remodeled so that the only entrance is shared with a bistro bar. You couldn't make it up!

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  62. Are there many Catholic Jesuits?

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