Rorate Caeli

Vatican II at 50: Note on the "Year of Faith", in "continuity with the whole Tradition"


CONGREGATION FOR THE DOCTRINE OF THE FAITH

Note with pastoral recommendations for the Year of Faith

Introduction


With the Apostolic Letter of 11 October 2011, Porta fidei, Pope Benedict XVI declared a Year of Faith. This year will begin on 11 October 2012, on the 50th anniversary of the opening of the Second Ecumenical Vatican Council, and will conclude on 24 November 2013, the Solemnity of our Lord Jesus Christ, Universal King.

This year will be a propitious occasion for the faithful to understand more profoundly that the foundation of Christian faith is "the encounter with an event, a person, which gives life a new horizon and a decisive direction."1 Founded on the encounter with the Risen Christ, faith can be rediscovered in its wholeness and all its splendor. "In our days too faith is a gift to rediscover, to cultivate and to bear witness to" because the Lord "grants each one of us to live the beauty and joy of being Christians."2
The beginning of the Year of Faith coincides with the anniversaries of two great events which have marked the life of the Church in our days: the fiftieth anniversary of the opening of the Second Vatican Council, called by Blessed Pope John XXIII (11 October 1962), and the twentieth of the promulgation of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, given to the Church by Blessed Pope John Paul II (11 October 1992).
The Council, according to Pope John XXIII, wanted "to transmit doctrine, pure and whole, without attenuations or misrepresentations," in such a way that "this sure and immutable teaching, which must be respected faithfully, is elaborated and presented in a way which corresponds to the needs of our time."3 In this regard, the opening words of the Dogmatic Constitution Lumen gentium remain of primary importance: "Christ is the Light of nations. Because this is so, this Sacred Synod gathered together in the Holy Spirit eagerly desires, by proclaiming the Gospel to every creature, (cfr. Mk 16:15) to bring the light of Christ to all men, a light brightly visible on the countenance of the Church."4 Beginning with the light of Christ, which purifies, illuminates and sanctifies in the celebration of the sacred liturgy (cfr. Constitution, Sacrosanctum Concilium) and with His divine word (cfr. Dogmatic Constitution, Dei Verbum), the Council wanted to elaborate on the intimate nature of the Church (cfr. Dogmatic Constitution, Lumen gentium) and its relationship with the contemporary world (cfr. Pastoral Constitution, Gaudium et spes). Around these four Constitutions, the true pillars of the Council, are arranged the Declarations and Decrees which address some of the major challenges of the day.
After the Council the Church – under the sure guidance of the Magisterium and in continuity with the whole Tradition – set about ensuring the reception and application of the teaching of the Council in all its richness. To assist in the correct reception of the Council, the Popes have frequently convoked the Synod of Bishops,5 first instituted by the Servant of God, Paul VI, in 1965, providing the Church with clear guidance through the various post-Synodal Apostolic Exhortations. The next General Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, to be held in October 2012, will have as its theme: The New Evangelization for the Transmission of the Christian Faith.
From the beginning of his pontificate, Pope Benedict XVI has worked decisively for a correct understanding of the Council, rejecting as erroneous the so-called "hermeneutic of discontinuity and rupture" and promoting what he himself has termed "the ‘hermeneutic of reform’, of renewal in the continuity of the one subject-Church which the Lord has given to us. She is a subject which increases in time and develops, yet always remaining the same, the one subject of the journeying People of God."6
The Catechism of the Catholic Church, in this same vein, is both an "authentic fruit of Vatican Council II"7 and a tool for aiding in its reception. The Extraordinary Synod of Bishops of 1985, convoked on the occasion of the twentieth anniversary of the closing of the Second Vatican Council and to measure its reception, suggested the preparation of a Catechism in order to offer the People of God a compendium of all Catholic doctrine and a sure point of reference for local catechisms. Pope John Paul II accepted this proposal as a desire which "fully responds to a real need of the universal Church and of the particular Churches."8 Compiled in collaboration with the entire Episcopate of the Catholic Church, this Catechism "truly expresses what could be called the symphony of the faith."9
The Catechism includes "the new and the old (cfr. Mt 13:52), because the faith is always the same yet the source of ever new light. To respond to this twofold demand, the Catechism of the Catholic Church on the one hand repeats the old, traditional order already followed by the Catechism of St Pius V, arranging the material in four parts: the Creed, the Sacred Liturgy, with pride of place given to the sacraments, the Christian way of life, explained beginning with the Ten Commandments, and finally, Christian prayer. At the same time, however, the contents are often expressed in a new way in order to respond to the questions of our age."10 This Catechism is "a valid and legitimate instrument for ecclesial communion and a sure norm for teaching the faith."11 The content of faith finds " its systematic and organic synthesis in the Catechism of the Catholic Church. Here, in fact, we see the wealth of teaching that the Church has received, safeguarded and proposed in her two thousand years of history. From Sacred Scripture to the Fathers of the Church, from theological masters to the saints across the centuries, the Catechism provides a permanent record of the many ways in which the Church has meditated on the faith and made progress in doctrine so as to offer certitude to believers in their lives of faith."12
The Year of Faith is intended to contribute to a renewed conversion to the Lord Jesus and to the rediscovery of faith, so that the members of the Church will be credible and joy-filled witnesses to the Risen Lord in the world of today - capable of leading those many people who are seeking it to the "door of faith." This "door" opens wide man’s gaze to Jesus Christ, present among us "always, until the end of the age" (Mt 28:20). He shows us how "the art of living" is learned "in an intense relationship with him."13 "Through his love, Jesus Christ attracts to himself the people of every generation: in every age he convokes the Church, entrusting her with the proclamation of the Gospel by a mandate that is ever new. Today too, there is a need for stronger ecclesial commitment to new evangelization in order to rediscover the joy of believing and the enthusiasm for communicating the faith."14
At the invitation of Pope Benedict XVI,15 the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, in consultation with the competent Dicasteries of the Holy See and with the contribution of the Committee for the Preparation of the Year of Faith,16 has drawn up this Note, with some recommendations for living this time of grace, without precluding other initiatives which the Holy Spirit will inspire among Pastors and faithful in various parts of the world.

Recommendations

"I know him in whom I have believed" (2 Tm 1:12). These words of St Paul help us to understand that faith is "first of all a personal adherence of man to God. At the same time, and inseparably, it is a free assent to the whole truth that God has revealed."17 Faith which is a personal trust in the Lord and the faith which we profess in the Creed are inseparable; they focus on each other and they require each other. There exists a profound bond between the lived faith and its contents. The faith of the Witnesses and Confessors is also the faith of the Apostles and Doctors of the Church.
Thus, the following recommendations for the Year of Faith desire to aid both the encounter with Christ through authentic witnesses to faith, and the ever-greater understanding of its contents. These proposals are intended as examples to encourage a ready response to the invitation of the Holy Father to live fully this Year as a special "time of grace."18 The joyous rediscovery of faith can also contribute to consolidate the unity and communion among the different bodies that make up the wider family of the Church.

I. On the level of the Universal Church

1. The main ecclesial event at the beginning of the Year of Faith will be the XIII General Assembly of the Ordinary Synod of Bishops, convoked by Pope Benedict XVI in October 2012, dedicated to The New Evangelization for the Transmission of the Christian Faith. During this Synod, on 11 October 2012, there will be a solemn celebration of the beginning of the Year of Faith, in remembrance of the fiftieth anniversary of the opening of the Second Vatican Council.
2. In the Year of Faith pilgrimages of the faithful to the See of Peter are to be encouraged, to profess faith in God the Father, Son and Holy Spirit, in unity with him who today is called to confirm his brothers and sisters in the faith (cfr. Lk 22:32). It is also important to promote pilgrimages to the Holy Land, the place which first saw the presence of Jesus, the Savior, and Mary, his Mother.
3. During this Year, it will be helpful to invite the faithful to turn with particular devotion to Mary, model of the Church, who "shines forth to the whole community of the elect as the model of virtues."19 Therefore, every initiative that helps the faithful to recognize the special role of Mary in the mystery of salvation, love her and follow her as a model of faith and virtue is to be encouraged. To this end it would be proper to organize pilgrimages, celebrations and gatherings at the major Marian shrines.
4. The next World Youth Day, in Rio de Janeiro in July 2013, will offer a special occasion for the young to experience the joy which comes from faith in the Lord Jesus and communion with the Holy Father, in the greater family of the Church.
5. It is hoped that many symposia, conferences and large gatherings will be held, even at the international level, to encourage encounters with authentic witness to the faith and to promote understanding of the contents of Catholic doctrine. Noting how, still today, the Word of God continues to grow and spread, it will be important to give witness that "all the anguish and all the longing of the human heart finds fulfilment"20 in Christ Jesus and that faith "becomes a new criterion of understanding and action that changes the whole of man’s life."21Some conferences should be particularly dedicated to the rediscovery of the teachings of Vatican Council II.
6. The Year of Faith will offer a special opportunity for all believers to deepen their knowledge of the primary documents of the Second Vatican Council and their study of the Catechism of the Catholic Church. This is especially true for candidates for priesthood, particularly during the propedeutic year or in their first years of theological studies, for novices in Institutes of Consecrated Life and Societies of Apostolic Life, as well as for those in a period of discernment for joining an Ecclesial Association or Movement.
7. This Year will provide an auspicious time for a more attentive reception of the homilies, catechesis, addresses and other speeches and documents of the Holy Father. Pastors, consecrated persons and the lay faithful are invited to renew their efforts in effective and heart-felt adherence to the teaching of the Successor of Peter.
8. During the Year of Faith, in cooperation with the Pontifical Council for the Promotion of Christian Unity, various ecumenical initiatives are to be planned, aimed at "the restoration of unity among all Christians" which "is one of the principal concerns of the Second Vatican Council."22 In particular, there will be a solemn ecumenical celebration in which all of the baptized will reaffirm their faith in Christ.
9. A Secretariat to coordinate all of the different initiatives promoted by various Dicasteries of the Holy See, or other events relevant to the Universal Church, will be established within the Pontifical Council for the Promotion of the New Evangelization. This Secretariatshould be informed timely of the main events and can also suggest appropriate initiatives. The Secretariat will open a dedicated website with the goal of making available useful information regarding living out the Year of Faith more effectively.
10. At the conclusion of this Year, on the Solemnity of Our Lord Jesus Christ, Universal King, there will be a Eucharist celebrated by the Holy Father, in which a solemn renewal of the profession of faith will take place.

II. On the level of Episcopal Conferences23
1. Episcopal Conferences, in light of the specific mission of the Bishops as teachers and "heralds of the faith,"24 can dedicate a day of study to the topic of faith, its personal witness and its transmission to new generations.
2. The republication in paperback and economical editions of the Documents of Vatican Council II, the Catechism of the Catholic Churchand its Compendium is to be promoted, as is the wider distribution of these texts through electronic means and modern technologies.
3. A renewed effort to translate the documents of Vatican Council II and the Catechism of the Catholic Church into languages which lack a translation is desirable. Initiatives of charitable support to enable translations into the local languages of mission countries, where the local Churches cannot afford the expense, are to be encouraged. This should be done under the guidance of the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples.
4. Pastors should work to promote television and radio transmissions, films and publications focusing on the faith, its principles and content, as well as on the ecclesial significance of the Second Vatican Council. This should be done using the new styles of communication, especially on the popular level, making these things available to a wider public.
5. The Saints and the Blessed are the authentic witnesses of the faith.25 It is, therefore, opportune that Episcopal Conferences work toward the dissemination of a knowledge of the local Saints of their territory, also by modern means of social communication.
6. The contemporary world is sensitive to the relationship between faith and art. It is, therefore, recommended that Episcopal Conferences maximize the catechetical potential – possibly with ecumenical cooperation – of the artistic patrimony of the region entrusted to their pastoral care.
7. Educators in centers of theological studies, seminaries and Catholic universities should be encouraged in their teaching to demonstrate the relevance within their various disciplines of the contents of the Catechism of the Catholic Church and of the implications derived from them.
8. It would be useful to arrange for the preparation of pamphlets and leaflets of an apologetic nature (cfr. 1 Pt 3:15), which should be done with the help of theologians and authors. Every member of the faithful would then be enabled to respond better to the questions which arise in difficult contexts – whether to do with sects, or the problems related to secularism and relativism, or to questions "arising from a changed mentality which, especially today, limits the field of rational certainties to that of scientific and technological discoveries,"26 or to other specific issues.
9. It is hoped that local catechisms and various catechetical supplements in use in the particular Churches would be examined to ensure their complete conformity with the Catechism of the Catholic Church.27 Should a catechism or supplement be found to be not totally in accord with the Catechism, or should some lacunae be discovered, new ones should be developed, following the example of those Conferences which have already done so.
10. The Year of Faith will also be an appropriate time to examine, in collaboration with the Congregation for Catholic Education, theRatio of formation for future priests, ensuring that the contents of the Catechism for the Catholic Church are present in their theological studies.

III. At the Diocesan level

1. It is hoped that each particular Church would have a celebration of the opening of the Year of Faith and a solemn conclusion to it, in which to "profess our faith in the Risen Lord in our cathedrals and in the churches of the whole world."28
2. It would be desirable that each Diocese in the world organize a study day on the Catechism of the Catholic Church, particularly for its priests, consecrated persons and catechists. On this occasion, for example, the Eastern Catholic Eparchies could hold a meeting with their priests to give witness to their specific experience and liturgical tradition in the one faith in Christ. Also, in this way, young particular Churches in mission territories would be able to give renewed witness to that joy of faith which is so often particular to them.
3. Each Bishop could devote a pastoral letter of his own to the topic of faith, keeping in mind the specific pastoral circumstances of the portion of the faithful entrusted to him, reminding them of the importance of the Second Vatican Council and of the Catechism of the Catholic Church.
4. It is hoped that in each Diocese, under the leadership of the Bishop, catechetical events will be organized, especially for the youth and those searching for a sense of life, helping them to discover the beauty of ecclesial faith, promoting encounters with meaningful witnesses to the faith.
5. It would be appropriate for each particular Church to review the reception of Vatican Council II and the Catechism of the Catholic Church in its own life and mission, particularly in the realm of catechesis. This would provide the opportunity for a renewal of commitment on the part of the catechetical offices of the Dioceses which - supported by the Commissions for Catechesis of the Episcopal Conferences – have the duty to care for the theological formation of catechists.
6. The continuing education of the clergy can be focused during this Year of Faith on the documents of Vatican Council II and on theCatechism of the Catholic Church, treating such themes as "the proclamation of the Risen Christ", "the Church - sacrament of salvation", "the mission of evangelization in the world today", "faith and disbelief", "faith, ecumenism and inter-religious dialogue", "faith and eternal life", "the hermeneutic of reform in continuity" and "the Catechism in ordinary pastoral care."
7. Bishops are invited to organize penitential celebrations, particularly during Lent, in which all can ask for God’s forgiveness, especially for sins against faith. This Year also provides an appropriate occasion in which all can approach the Sacrament of Penance with greater faith and more frequently.
8. It is hoped that there will be a renewed creative dialogue between faith and reason in the academic and artistic communities, through symposia, meetings and days of study, especially at Catholic universities, in order to demonstrate that "there cannot be any conflict between faith and genuine science, because both, albeit via different routes, tend towards the truth."29
9. It is also important to promote encounters with those persons who, "while not claiming to have the gift of faith, are nevertheless sincerely searching for the ultimate meaning and definitive truth of their lives and of the world,"30 taking as an example the dialogues of the Courtyard of the Gentiles, sponsored by the Pontifical Council for Culture.
10. The Year of Faith can be an opportunity to pay greater attention to Catholic schools, which are a perfect place to offer to students a living witness to the Lord and to nurture their faith. This can be done by making use of good catechetical tools, like the Compendium of the Catechism of the Catholic Church and Youcat.

IV. At the level of the parish/community/association/movement

1. In preparation for the Year of Faith, all of the faithful are invited to read closely and meditate upon Pope Benedict XVI’s Apostolic Letter, Porta fidei.
2. The Year of Faith "will also be a good opportunity to intensify the celebration of the faith in the liturgy, especially in the Eucharist."31In the Eucharist, mystery of faith and source of the new evangelization, the faith of the Church is proclaimed, celebrated and strengthened. All of the faithful are invited to participate in the Eucharist actively, fruitfully and with awareness, in order to be authentic witnesses of the Lord.
3. Priests should devote greater attention to the study of the documents of Vatican Council II and the Catechism of the Catholic Church, drawing from them resources for the pastoral care of their parishes – catechesis, preaching, Sacramental preparation. They should also offer cycles of homilies on the faith or on certain specific aspects such as, for example, "the encounter with Christ", "the fundamental contents of the Creed", and "faith and the Church."32
4. Catechists should hold more firmly to the doctrinal richness of the Catechism of the Catholic Church and, under the direction of their pastors, offer guidance in reading this precious document to groups of faithful, working toward a deeper common understanding thereof, with the goal of creating small communities of faith, and of giving witness to the Lord Jesus.
5. It is hoped that there will be a renewed commitment in parishes to the distribution of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, and of other resources appropriate for families, which are true domestic churches and the primary setting for the transmission of the faith. This might be done, for example, during the blessing of homes, the Baptism of adults, Confirmations and Marriages. This can contribute to the deepening of Catholic teaching "in our homes and among our families, so that everyone may feel a strong need to know better and to transmit to future generations the faith of all times."33
6. The promotion of missions and other popular programs in parishes and in the workplace can help the faithful to rediscover the gift of Baptismal faith and the task of giving witness, knowing that the Christian vocation "by its very nature is also a vocation to the apostolate."34
7. During this time, members of Institutes of Consecrated Life and of Societies of Apostolic Life are asked to work towards the new evangelization with a renewed union to the Lord Jesus, each according to their proper charism, in fidelity to the Holy Father and to sound doctrine.
8. Contemplative communities, during the Year of Faith, should pray specifically for the renewal of the faith among the People of God and for a new impulse for its transmission to the young.
9. Associations and Ecclesial Movements are invited to promote specific initiatives which, through the contribution of their proper charism and in collaboration with their local Pastors, will contribute to the wider experience of the Year of Faith. The new Communities and Ecclesial Movements, in a creative and generous way, will be able to find the most appropriate ways in which to offer their witness to the faith in service to the Church.
10. All of the faithful, called to renew the gift of faith, should try to communicate their own experience of faith and charity35 to their brothers and sisters of other religions, with those who do not believe, and with those who are just indifferent. In this way, it is hoped that the entire Christian people will begin a kind of mission toward those with whom they live and work, knowing that they "have welcomed the news of salvation which is meant for every man."36

Conclusion

Faith "is the lifelong companion that makes it possible to perceive, ever anew, the marvels that God works for us. Intent on gathering the signs of the times in the present of history, faith commits every one of us to become a living sign of the presence of the Risen Lord in the world."37 Faith is both a personal and a communal act: it is a gift from God that is lived in the communion of the Church and must be communicated to the world. Every initiative for the Year of Faith should be designed to aid in the joyous rediscovery of the faith and its renewed transmission. The recommendations provided here have the goal of inviting all of the members of the Church to work so that thisYear may be a special time in which we, as Christians, may share that which is most dear to us: Christ Jesus, the Redeemer of mankind, Universal King, "leader and perfecter of faith" (Hb 12: 2).
Given in Rome, at the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, on 6 January 2012, the Solemnity of the Epiphany of the Lord.

William Cardinal Levada

Prefect


Luis F. Ladaria, S.I.

Titular Archbishop of Thibica
Secretary


____________________________

BENEDICT XVI, Enc. Letter, Deus caritas est, 25 December 2005, n. 1.

2 ID., Homily on the Feast of the Baptism of the Lord, 10 January 2010.

3 JOHN XXIII, Address of the solemn opening of the Ecumenical Vatican Council II, 11 October 1962.

4 CONC. ECUM. VAT. II, Dogmatic Constitution, Lumen gentium, n. 1.

5 The Ordinary Assemblies of the Synod of Bishops have treated the following topics: The preservation and strengthening of the Catholic Faith, its integrity, vigor, development, historical and doctrinal coherence (1967), The ministerial priesthood and justice in the world (1971), Evangelization in the modern world (1974),Catechesis in our time (1977), The Christian Family (1980), Penance and reconciliation in the mission of the Church (1983), The vocation and mission of the laity in the Church and in the world (1987), The formation of priests in actual circumstances (1991), Consecrated life and its mission in the Church and in the world(1994), The Bishop: Servant of the Gospel of Jesus Christ for the hope of the world (2001), The Eucharist: source and summit of the life and mission of the Church (2005), The Word of God in the life and mission of the Church (2008=.
6 BENEDICT XVI, Address to the Roman Curia, 22 December 2005.
7 ID., Porta fidei, n. 4.
8 JOHN PAUL II, Address on the closing of the Second Extraordinary Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, 7 December 1985, n. 6. The same Pope, in the initial phase of this Synod, during the Angelus of 24 November 1985, said: "Fatih is the principal foundation, it is the cornerstone, the essential criterion of the renewal willed by the Council. From faith come custom, the stile of life and practical direction in every circumstance."
9 ID., Apostolic Constitution, Fidei depositum, 11 October 1992, n. 2.
10 Ibid., n. 3.
11 Ibid., n. 4.
12 BENEDICT XVI, Porta fidei, n. 11.
13 ID., Address to the participants in the meeting organized by the Pontifical Council for the Promotion of the New Evangelization, 15 October 2011.
14 ID., Apostolic Letter, Porta fidei, n. 7.
15 Cfr. ibid., n. 12.
17 Catechism of the Catholic Church, n. 150.
18 BENEDICT XVI, Apostolic Letter, Porta fidei, n. 15.
19 CONC. ECUM. VAT. II, Dogmatic Constitution, Lumen gentium, n. 65.
20 BENEDICT XVI, Apostolic Letter, Porta fidei, n. 13.
21 Ibid., n. 6.
22 CONC. ECUM. VAT. II, Decree, Unitatis redintigratio, n. 1.
23 The following recommendations made for Episcopal Conferences are also offered, in an analogous way, to the Synods of Bishops of Patriarchal and Major Archepiscopal Churches, as well as to the Assemblies of Hierarchs of the other Eastern Catholic Churches sui iuris.
24 CONC. ECUM. VAT. II, Dogmatic Constitution, Lumen gentium, n. 25.
25 BENEDICT XVI, Apostolic Letter, Porta fidei, n. 13.
26 Ibid., n. 12.
27 JOHN PAUL II, Apostolic Constitution, Fidei depositum, n. 4.
28 BENEDICT XVI, Apostolic Letter, Porta fidei, n. 8.
29 Ibid., n. 12.
30 Ibid., n. 10.
31 Ibid., n. 9.
32 Cfr., BENEDICT XVI, Apostolic Exhortation, Verbum Domini, 30 September 2010, nn. 59-60, and 74.
33 ID., Apostolic Letter, Porta fidei, n. 8.
34 CONC. ECUM. VAT. II, Decree, Apstolicam actuositatem, n. 2.
35 Cfr. BENEDICT XVI, Apostolic Letter, Porta fidei, n. 14.
36 CONC. ECUM. VAT. II, Pastoral Constitution, Gaudium et spes, n. 1.
37 BENEDICT XVI, Apostolic Letter, Porta fidei, n. 15.
[00005-02.01] [Original text: English]
16 This Committee, formed by the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, according to the mandate of the Holy Father, Benedict XVI, includes among its members: Cardinals William Levada, Francis Arinze, Angelo Bagnasco, Ivan Dias, Francis E. George, Zenon Grocholewski, Marc Ouellet, Mauro Piacenza, Jean-Pierre Ricard, Stanisław Ryłko and Christoph Schönborn; Archbishops Luis F. Ladaria, and Salvatore Fisichella; Bishops Mario Del Valle Moronta Rodríguez, Gerhard Ludwig Müller and Raffaello Martinelli.

67 comments:

New Catholic said...

It is still a mystery why the English-speaking members of the Curia decided upon the translation "Year of Faith", instead of "Year of THE Faith". It is not supposed to be a celebration of undefined "Faith" in general, one would suppose, but of The Faith - the same one that the Congregation for the Doctrine of THE Faith was created to defend.

Joshua said...

Some apposite aspirations to keep in one's heart and on one's lips:

Credo, Domine! (St John ix, 38a)
(I believe, Lord!)

[Domine,] Adauge nobis fidem! (St Luke xvii, 5b)
([Lord,] increase our faith!)

Credo, Domine; adjuva incredulitatem meam. (St Mark ix, 23b)
(Lord, I believe; help my unbelief.)

Credo Domine, sed credam firmius. (Pope Clement XI)
(I believe, Lord, but may I believe more firmly.)

O Lord, preserve to us the Faith.

And of course pray and meditate on the Creeds - the Apostles' Creed, the Nicene Creed (especially chanted), the Athanasian Creed, in Latin and the mother tongue – and make frequent Acts of Faith (as Benedict XIV long ago earnestly recommended, alongside Acts of the other theological virtues).

These are simple practical liftings of mind and heart to God. If you do nothing else in the Year of Faith, it will have been well spent; and doing so may well move you to do yet more.

Oremus said...

Perhaps "Year of Faith" points to the same modernist mindset as the "We are Church" crowd.

Doc said...

New Catholic, do you know what the Latin says? Usually the phrase "the faith" refers to the tenets of the Catholic religion, but "faith" refers to the theological virtue. Do you know which was the Holy Father's intent? Given the the contents of this letter and Porta fidei, either would make sense.

As an aside, when was the last time apologetics was explicitly promoted by Rome?

New Catholic said...

Of course either one can be chosen based on Annus fidei - but it is clear that the Year is meant as a celebration of the Faith, the Catholic Faith, which is why it is completely centered on Catechesis, not on faith simply, as if it were a celebration of the virtue (which really is something that cannot be celebrated or taught, but fostered).

Ecclesia Militans said...

Read the part of the post in bold.

History repeats itself, it is similiar to the time of Saint Athanasius.
The Arians also claimed continuity of the "subject-Church" - the institutions were indeed the same, the bishops were the same, the seminaries were the same, but the faith was not the same.
This is what is important.
The faith was a novelty contrary to all of Apostolic Tradition.

So Saint Athanasius said to his fellow Catholics:
"They have the premises – but you have the Apostolic Faith. They can occupy our churches, but they are outside the true Faith."

Let us face the hard truth.
It is not the same Church. We can clearly see how the faith has changed. It is now just an empty shell of the true Church, which you can see by its rapid decay and by the growth of Tradition.
They remain obstinate in their errors, look at the tone of the celebration of the disastrous Council. They refuse to return to Tradition even though they perish.
But where is the true Church then?
Again in the words of Saint Athanasius: "Even if Catholics faithful to Tradition are reduced to a handful, they are the ones who are the true Church of Jesus Christ."

It is time, more than ever, to pray for deliverance.

IRISH said...

The year of faith will be nothing more than a worldwide celebration of Vatican ll the most disasterous council in the history of the Catholic Church.

Supertradmum said...

The Pope leads us in the way of trying to bridge the break with continuity in the past 50 years. I like all of the suggestions here, but do they have teeth? There were visitations of seminaries in the States years ago and in several places, the status quo of a lack of Marian Devotion or the acceptance of homosexuals has continued.

All these guidelines as fine, but these need authority and some type of consequences if not followed. I shall highlight number 8 and note that the two major contemplative orders in my home diocese are not in habits, use an inclusive language Office which is not approved, and hold heretical ideas, such as the promotion of women priests among their numbers. No teeth...

Cibavit said...

My summary of what this document says:

"We shall celebrate the Year of Faith by Doing More of the Same as we've done in the past 40+ years."

My reaction:

YAWN.

Brian said...

Doc,
I am not sure what point you are trying to make.

While it is true that, as New Catholic points out, the general notion of faith can be a merely psychological or even a Protestant notion, the Catholic understanding of the Theological Virtue of Faith cannot be separated from "the Faith," i.e., the dogmas of the Catholic Church.

While it is true that in the Catholic understanding, Faith can be considered both objectively and subjectively, they cannot be separated. As the Catholic Encyclopedia instructs, “objectively, (Faith) stands for the sum of truths revealed by God in Scripture and tradition and which the Church presents to us (in a brief form in her creeds); subjectively, Faith stands for the habit or virtue by which we assent to those truths.”

They are two sides of the very same coin. Translating Annus fidei as "Year of the Faith" would make the connection clear; the translation, "Year of Faith," is as ambiguous as the Spirit of Vatican II, .

Timothy Mulligan said...

"The Faith" connotes an objective content. "Faith," in isolation, stresses the subjective, which, as we all know, is a hallmark of modernism.

An excellent analysis of this kind of pernicious morphing is found in Iota Unum, by Romano Amerio.

New Catholic said...

It should be noted that this translation was chosen in English, but not in other languages. In the de facto language of the Vatican, Italian, the name "Anno di Fede" could have been chosen (as it is used, for instance, in the expression "atto di fede", an act of faith), but the more proper "Anno della Fede" (Year of the Faith) was chosen instead. Similarly in French ("Année de la Foi", not "Année de Foi") Spanish ("Año de la Fe", instead of "Año de Fe") and in Portuguese ("Ano da Fé", instead of "Ano de Fé"), though not in German, where the words were arranged ("Jahr des Glaubens") in pretty much the only reasonable option. The article should not have been left out - once again proving that English has the skeleton of Angles and Saxons, but a heart filled with Romance...

Prof. Basto said...

"She is a subject which increases in time and develops, yet always remaining the same, the one subject of the journeying People of God"

Ah! The continuity of the subject!

What about the Faith of the Church?

Does the Faith of the one subject-Church remains also one and the same in the course of History?

Ted Maysfield said...

Reading the pope's words we see the emphasis on Vatican II as “immutable truth.”

I hope the pope-sifters are paying attention.

The Sovereign Pontiff affirms Vatican II.

Drop your Luther-like opposition and affirm Vatican II in the hermeneutic of continuity.

Enough of schism disguised as super-Catholicism!

Knight of Malta said...

Ecclesia: The faith [of the Arians] was a novelty contrary to all of Apostolic Tradition.

Couldn't agree more that this also describes the current praxis of the Church.

But then those with the keys were the architects of Vatican II (thus "Year of Faith" is predicated on Vatican II, and not a Dogmatic Council, such as Trent).

A Rhanerian might say the Church has "progressed", but in the words of the great theologian Gherardini:

[A] reform is not necessarily a development; it could actually be its opposite.

I'm sure the Arians who controlled the Church thought they were "developing" it, just as the Modernists who control the Church do now; but the opposite is true.

New Catholic said...

Yes! And affirm Nicaea I, Constantinople I, Ephesus, Chalcedon, Constantinople II, Constantinople III, Nicaea II,
Constantinople IV, Lateran I, Lateran II, Lateran III, Lateran IV, Lyon I, Lyon II, Vienne, Constance, Florence, Lateran V, Trent, and Vatican I !

By the way, since we have to affirm every single aspect of Vatican II, even the ones not repeating dogmatic definitions of the past, I gather we have to affirm every single non-dogmatic aspect of every single Council. For instance, "alienations or seizures of ecclesiastical property, which have been made by these schismatics or by lay persons, are to lack all validity and are to return to the church without any burden to it." (Lateran III, Canon 2) Can we please affirm this to the Anglicans? And to the French Republic? And to the other seizers of Catholic property?

Or are you going to stay in Luther-like opposition to Lateran III??? That is intolerable!

Prof. Basto said...

"From the beginning of his pontificate, Pope Benedict XVI has worked decisively for a correct understanding of the Council, rejecting as erroneous the so-called "hermeneutic of discontinuity and rupture" and promoting what he himself has termed "the ‘hermeneutic of reform’, of renewal in the continuity of the one subject-Church which the Lord has given to us.

The examination about whether or not the ecclesiastical praxis of our time is in continuity with tradition, that is, the analysis about whether or not the Church in our time, in our generation, is in continuity of TEACHING, OF DOCRINE, with the Church of generations past, of centuries past, is a matter of factual examination, it deals with FACTS.

Therefore, if the Facts show rupture, a supposed continuity cannot be established by decree (in a kind of "black is white because I say so", fashion)

Rupture exists clearly, for instance, in the field of the Liturgy. The Novus Ordo is not in continuity with the TLM; instead, there was continuity in the Tratidional Form of the Roman Rite until the 1962 Missal; the 1570 and the 1962 Missal are part of the same liturgical continuity, that embraces also the pre-tridentine texts of the Roman Mass. But with the 1970 Missal there was a rupture in this liturgical tradition, with the birth of a new Form of the Mass.

If the 1962 and 1970 Missals were in continuity, then the latest edition would have just replaced the prior one, just like the 1570 edition was replaced by a few subsequent editions until and including the 1962. The fact that the 1962 Missal was officially declared not abrogated, and that the NO and TLM are now considered two different forms of the Roman Rite, shows us that there was liturgical rupture. A fork in the road creating a new path.

Now, the current debate deals with the more important issue of continuity of the DOCTRINE, of the product of the activity of the Magisterium.

The Magisterium as "Teaching Office" is the same, it remains vested in the same organs: the Pope, his Curia, Ecumenical Councils, etc. But the Magisterium as "Teaching", as a product of the office, is it the same? Is it in continuity with tradtion? Is it handing down what was received? Or is it changing the content of the docrine of the Faith?

That the subject Church remains the same is obvious. But the current debate about specific teachings where it appears that rupture took place (such as the teaching on religious liberty; on ecumenism, etc) aims at finding out whether or not DOCTRINAL RUPTURE took place.

The continuity of certain teachings is difficult to demonstrate. The Church hierarchy keeps affirming that there is continuity. If that is so, then the hierarchy should publish a demonstration, explaining how exactly those specific, difficult, teachings do not represent rupture.

If the Church in the end concludes that doctrinal rupture took place, then the question about the weight or force of the different mouthpieces of the Magisterium arises. And then probably the Pastoral council, the documents of which explicitly affirm such pastoral character, should give way to the earlier, dogmatically proclaimed docrine.

Thomas said...

More ink wasted on meaningless words. In other words, it is more of the same: Further "deification" of "The Council" couched in lots of fluffy words.

It's always about "The Council" and how well we poor souls are fulfilling the goals and aspirations of The Council.

Words have meaning! Unless and until the VERY TERM "the council" is banished or falls into disuse, the whole church is doomed to a slow spiral downward.

jasoncpetty said...

LOL, publish one article making the distinction between objectivity and subjectivity and suddenly every Rorate Caeli commenter's an armchair philosopher stoking his pipe and explaining real continuity. (Not saying that article was wrong--it's above my paygrade, as they say--but I love watching the echo-chamber effect.)

Prof. Basto said...

This CDF Document, by reffering to the question of the continuity of the subject (The Church), avoids the all important question, of the continuity of the DOCTRINE handed down by this subject.

Affirmation of the continuity of the subject is not enough! The question of DOCTRINAL CONTINUITY needs to be addressed.

At the end of the Holy See-SSPX docrinal discussion it seems that the Curia is now content with merely proclaiming the continuity of the subject-Church, thus avoiding the question of the objective docrinal continuity or rupture.

By saying that the subject can "develop" the CDF seems even to accept, at least implicitly, the possibility of docrinal rupture, of change in teaching: the subject remains the same, but it "develops" and "increases" its knowledge.

Well, docrinal development is only possible when it deepens knowledge of a truth. If one teaching contradicts a prior teaching, the prior teaching is actually not "developed" or "increased", it is denied.

So the question of docrinal continuity must be faced, and it does not suffice to affirm the continuity of the institution that teaches.

Tradical said...

Hi All,

I was particularly pleased by '...various ecumenical initiatives are to be planned, aimed at "the restoration of unity ... In particular, there will be a solemn ecumenical celebration in which all of the baptized will reaffirm their faith in Christ. ...'

Now is this the Theological Virtue of Faith? Are they going to suddenly start to focus on what is separating the 'separated brethern' from the Church?

Thorin said...

A very useful and welcome document from the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith.

Tradical said...

Hi Ted,

" ... I hope the pope-sifters are paying attention ... Drop your Luther-like opposition and affirm Vatican II in the hermeneutic of continuity."

Thanks for the new moniker - never heard that derisive term before. Obviously you are a V2'er. (sticks and stones)

In the line of 'continuity'. Please demonstrate the doctrinal continuity in the NeoCat Way, Charismatic Movement, Assisi 123?

As long as these are held up for admiration as the 'fruits of V2', what are people who read and believe the Pre-V2 catechisms to do? Hang their heads and keep their mouths shut?

JFM said...

Vatican II was a bungled affair from the word go, which should be apparent to all. In attempting to "Come to terms" with modernity, the Church essentially admitted it sensed a problem, and then fudged or offered half-baked compromises. It left no one happy, by jettisoning what it called a petrified part and halfway flirting with 60s peacenik theologies. And 50 years later, still no one can really clarify with any definition what the outcome was supposed to be. Were we to keep following the wooden scholasticism or Garrigou-Lagrange, or pretend to be helped by the impossibly opaque prose of Rahner and Ratzinger? Neither, apparently, Instead we are to watch parish and school close, on after another, as clerics lecture on community and inspiration, and apologize for hurting the feelings of various groups. But if we dare not rally round the empty papal endorsements of the council sponsored by the same players before their ascendancy, we are schismatic like Luther? Such bogus suggestions reinforce accusations of Catholics as simply temperamental follower-types. "If doesn't matter if you sense a contradiction! The pope gets to say what and what is not contradictory logic. Just shut up and believe." This 1. not at all in keeping with Vatican II, and 2. the cause of our emptying churches.

New Catholic said...

Mr. McFarland, please read my previous comments on the matter one more time: similarities with the English construction exist in the mentioned Romance languages - the only exception, among all languages used by the Vatican in its documents, is German, for reasons proper to that language. In all those languages, if the article had been ommitted (a grammatical possibility), a similar semantic problem would have arisen.

I am not Spartacus said...

The Sovereign Pontiff affirms Vatican II.

Drop your Luther-like opposition and affirm Vatican II in the hermeneutic of continuity.



Dear Mr. Maysfield. Here is V2 on Holy Scripture


Dei Verbum


19. Holy Mother Church has firmly and with absolute constancy held, and continues to hold, that the four Gospels just named, whose historical character the Church unhesitatingly asserts, faithfully hand on what Jesus Christ, while living among men, really did and taught for their eternal salvation until the day He was taken up into heaven (see Acts 1:1). Indeed, after the Ascension of the Lord the Apostles handed on to their hearers what He had said and done. This they did with that clearer understanding which they enjoyed (3) after they had been instructed by the glorious events of Christ's life and taught by the light of the Spirit of truth. (2) The sacred authors wrote the four Gospels, selecting some things from the many which had been handed on by word of mouth or in writing, reducing some of them to a synthesis, explaining some things in view of the situation of their churches and preserving the form of proclamation but always in such fashion that they told us the honest truth about Jesus.(4) For their intention in writing was that either from their own memory and recollections, or from the witness of those who "themselves from the beginning were eyewitnesses and ministers of the Word" we might know "the truth" concerning those matters about which we have been instructed (see Luke 1:2-4).

In the first of his "Jesus of Nazareth" books, Our Holy Father wrote that John was not the author of The Gospel wrongly attributed to him but was instead composed by some anonymous man named John.

So, where is the continuity in just the last 50 years say nothing about the last 2012 years?

Gratias said...

These celebrations of V2 will degenerate into a free-for-all at local and diocesan levels. Not a single word about a more reverent Liturgy. Brace yourselves. At least some mention was made of the Virgin Mary, who is currently essentially ostracized from the American post-V2 Church.

We got Summorum Pontificum but the clock will not be turned back. A pity.

Prof. Basto said...

Fr. Jean-Michel Gleize's article recently published by Rorate Caeli was an eye-opener.

And it does seem that both the 2005 papal adress to the Roman Curia and subsequent magisterial documents dealing with the repudiation of the "hermeneutic of rupture" only focus on the subjective aspect, of the Church being the same Church, because, as the Pope put it in his 2005 Christmas Adress, the Divine Constitution of the Church being unchangeable, the 2nd Vatican Council had no mandate to alter the Church's constitution, to found or re-found the Church established by Jesus Christ.

But if the Church is the same, Her doctrine should also have remained the same. At first, it didn't seem as if the "hermeneutic of renewal in continuity" denied this.

But more and more, in recent documents, such as this one by the CDF, when the ecclesiastical authorities speak of continuity, they do so focusing only the subjective aspect, while avoiding the question of continuity of doctrinal content.

So, yes, we should follow in the footsteps of Fr. Jean-Michel Gleize and insist that the question of the objective continuity of the Doctrine of the Faith be addressed.

Admirer of the Future Pius XIII said...

Let us have faith and hope that 500 years from now, faithful Catholics will be celebrating the 400th anniversary of the nullification of a particular ecumenical council that dare not speak its name.

Prof. Basto said...

Fr. Jean-Michel Gleize's article recently published by Rorate Caeli was an eye-opener.

And it does seem that both the 2005 papal adress to the Roman Curia and subsequent magisterial documents dealing with the repudiation of the "hermeneutic of rupture" only focus on the subjective aspect, of the Church being the same Church, because, as the Pope put it in his 2005 Christmas Adress, the Divine Constitution of the Church being unchangeable, the 2nd Vatican Council had no mandate to alter the Church's constitution, to found or re-found the Church established by Jesus Christ.

But if the Church is the same, Her doctrine should also have remained the same. At first, it didn't seem as if the "hermeneutic of renewal in continuity" denied this.

But more and more, in recent documents, such as this one by the CDF, when the ecclesiastical authorities speak of continuity, they do so focusing only the subjective aspect, while avoiding the question of continuity of doctrinal content.

So, yes, we should follow in the footsteps of Fr. Jean-Michel Gleize and insist that the question of the objective continuity of the Doctrine of the Faith be addressed.

Pertinacious Papist said...

I should hope that in the midst of the all-too-ebullient encomiums that may occasionally mark these anniversary celebrations of Vatican II, the horror of its coincidence with the most destructive iconoclastic movement since either the Reformation or French Revolution shall not be altogether forgotten. I do not remark here upon the possible relationship between the two.

Steve said...

Fatima has been officially relegated to the past. 2012-13 would be an excellent time for Fatima to come roaring back into focus. These are very exciting times!

Long-Skirts said...

Supertradmom said:

"such as the promotion of women priests among their numbers."


Ecclesia Militans said:

"It is now just an empty shell of the true Church, which you can see by its rapid decay "


I Am Not Spartacus said:

"Our Holy Father wrote that John was not the author of The Gospel wrongly attributed to him "

Gratias said:

"the Virgin Mary, who is currently essentially ostracized from the American post-V2 Church."

SODIUM & CHLORIDE

Our leaders don't lead anymore
Our heroes aren't valiant anymore
Our fathers aren't home anymore
Our mothers won't birth anymore

Our churches don't awe anymore
Our futures aren't safe anymore
Our past no roots anymore
Our present not ours anymore

The truth is glossed anymore
But hang a cross anymore
They'll all appear anymore
Outraged at faith anymore

They share their lusts and explore
They're salt of the earth, they implore
They're seasoned whores to the core
They’re Dead Sea’s sodium-souled floor

LeonG said...

Or even the joy of being a Roman Catholic which signifies "The Faith" propagated by The Church.

Gregorian Mass said...

I wish when talking about Continuity with the past and Vatican II they would mention concretely some examples. Someone reading this as is sees "Vatican II" over an over again but no mention of exactly what from the past. Where is the mention of Trent, Lateran IV, etc., in the same sentence. Glaring from the page so to speak. "The Past" is so vague, varied and wide it could mean anything. Why not include some pages from Trent, one of the most important, if not THE most important Council in the history of the Church, in this new "afforable" booklet type thing they want to have put together? They want to give you the documents from Vat II, for you to read exhaustively and then go searching on your own through a myriad of other Councils and Church teachings and documents and decide for yourself what should be in continuity or maybe not. It would be most helpful if they actually laid out some of the most important teachings of each Council, and provided them in the same booklet with Vat II documents for the reader to flip some pages and make comparisons from one to another and draw that continuity. In this format the most important things will be embedded in the brain and hopefully spirit. The way they are encouraging it now again leaves one thinking that Vat II and its' documents are the Super Council and the rest a research lesson or puzzle you must find and put together when and if you have the time.

Irenaeus of New York said...

[---
It is still a mystery why the English-speaking members of the Curia decided upon the translation "Year of Faith", instead of "Year of THE Faith"
---]

Somehow, I think it was the same line of thinking that infected Charles to change his title from "Defender of the Faith" to "Defender of the faiths".

I could be wrong though...

Brian said...

Were we to keep following the wooden scholasticism or Garrigou-Lagrange

Have you ever read Garrigou-Lagrange's writings? They are burning with faith and are focused on mystical transformation in Christ through the Theological Virtues and the supernatural Gifts of the Holy Spirit.

It strikes me that to speak of these writings as wooden may say more about you than they do about Garrigou-Lagrange's scholasticism.

Lee Lovelock-Jemmott said...

@Thomas, I could not agree with thee more. Nothing but vacuous and empty words from clerics who seem to embody the impoverishment of Latin Catholicism. Drives me insane and I wait for the date that most of these clerics are swept far away from the levers of the Faith !!! As to this never-ending episode of leaving things open to The Diktat Conferences is just beggars' belief and another sign of the odious and thoroughly noxious substance called Vatican II !!!

PEH said...

Yesterday I watched the Celebration of the Epiphany on EWTN via Vatican Radio and TV. Pope Benedict XVI was seated in the middle and to his right was Cardinal Bertone and to his left Cardinal Levada. That tells me more than anything else where the Church is headed in this 50th Anniversary of Vatican II.

On top of that two new NO priests were consecrated as bishops and given the title of archbishop. Words mean little at this point; actions are what is important. As long as traditional Catholic groups such as the FSSPX and others classified as independents are denied legitimacy, these words that "Vatican II is in continuity with Tradition" ring hollow.

Now, I don't know if this post will see the light of day since my most recent posts have evidently met the trashcan but, I must say what is in my heart and let the chips fall where they may.

Shane said...

Just curious: did anyone actually read all this? It was a painful exercise. The prose, which is reminiscent of John Paul II's encyclicals, is laden with tired buzzwords (eg. "creative dialogue").

Xavier Rynne said...

I suggest that we begin insisting that Vatican II can only be understood fully in conjunction with Vatican I. This will go a long way to ending the transformation of Vatican II into some kind of stand alone, mega-council.

Long-Skirts said...

Ted Maysfield said:

"Drop your Luther-like opposition and affirm Vatican II in the hermeneutic of continuity...Enough of schism disguised as super-Catholicism!"

The
Loser's
Prayer

The present profound
Given
To thee...
The sacred Mass eternally.

No money, car,
House or thing
Will ever make
Your soul quite sing

The way it does
If rich or poor,
Makes sinners saints
A holy lure.

Will take your tears
You shed in pain
And turn all loss
Into your gain.

Where heavy hearts
They go to pray
At dawn's first light
At break of day.

Where miracles
That never die
Will lighten hearts
So they can fly

Out in the world,
But never of...
Candle light
And rock salt love.

The sacred Mass
Toward rising sun
And sun she scolds...
"He rose, you've won!"

Knight of Malta said...

Pertinacious: "...the horror of its coincidence..."

What of this coincidence:

Novus Ordo Missae
Novus Ordo Seculorum (a Masonic term)

Bugnini was a likely Mason; coincidence?

Delphina said...

Shane wrote:

"Just curious: did anyone actually read all this? It was a painful exercise."

No. It's the same old stuff laden with the same old buzz words and phrases.

Prof. Basto said...

Shane,

Yes, I've read it. My sensation: nausea. It really makes one want to vomit.

For instance, consider the following passage:

"2. The republication in paperback and economical editions of the Documents of Vatican Council II, the Catechism of the Catholic Churchand its Compendium is to be promoted, as is the wider distribution of these texts through electronic means and modern technologies.
3. A renewed effort to translate the documents of Vatican Council II and the Catechism of the Catholic Church into languages which lack a translation is desirable. Initiatives of charitable support to enable translations into the local languages of mission countries, where the local Churches cannot afford the expense, are to be encouraged. This should be done under the guidance of the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples.
4. Pastors should work to promote television and radio transmissions, films and publications focusing on the faith, its principles and content, as well as on the ecclesial significance of the Second Vatican Council. This should be done using the new styles of communication, especially on the popular level, making these things available to a wider public.


QUESTION: Will this be the Year of the Faith, or the Year of "The Council"? All the events, all the proposals, seem to be about Vatican Council II!

Is the Faith the same thing as Vatican II? 50 years have passed, but the hype continues! As if Vatican II had been the one and only Council, the nucleus of the belief of the Church, or at least of the Church in our days, as if Vatican II were to be, for us, the central point of reference of the whole Faith. Enough, already.

If the Documents of the 2nd Vatican Council are to be printed and distributed anew in economical editions, why not print again the luminous pages of the acts of the First Vatican Ecumenical Council, the Decrees and Canons of the Holy Council of Trent?

CH DUPUY said...

"Just curious: did anyone actually read all this? It was a painful exercise. The prose, which is reminiscent of John Paul II's encyclicals, is laden with tired buzzwords (eg. "creative dialogue")."
!Oh boy¡ I couldn't. Just quit reading halfway.

Gratias said...

Reading this document one sees great emphasis on studying the Catechism of the Catholic Church (in addition to the V2 documents). If you enjoy educational reading, go to Catholic Encyclopedia available online for the pre-V2 teachings. It really is a fabulous resource for all Catholics.

Tom the Milkman said...

Perhaps it's now the Congregation for the Doctrine of faith?...

IRISH said...

Is it not strange that Our Lady of Fatima told Sister Lucia that the Third Secret must be opened and revealed to the world NO LATER THAN 1960 - two years before this disasterous council was to begin.
Pope Paul Vl stated at the council that the smoke of satan had entered the Church, in fact he entered the Church not as a mere observer but to manipulate and control the council and he is still there today. The council was a great victory for satan so what we are really doing this year is celebrating satans victory in causing the greatest destruction of the Catholic Faith in recent times and it is being organised by the very head of the Church itself.

Fr Paul McDonald said...

Has even Paul VI become too traditional (in some respects) for the current "living magisterium"?

I didn't notice any mention of his magnificent Credo of the People of God, which for example *identifies* the Mystical Body of Christ with the Catholic and Roman Church (i.e. no "subsitit" crap), and speaks of the "fires of Purgatory".

Or who taught that the non-Christian religions cannot put a man into the state of grace (Evangelii nuntiandi).

Paul VI called a year of the Faith too in 1968 and it was *not* about celebrating the Council.

How long, o Lord?

ToS said...

Drop your Luther-like opposition and affirm Vatican II in the hermeneutic of continuity.

Drop your sedevacantist attitude that the Popes can do no wrong and accept that the fact that a council can be a failure and full of ambiguity.

Xavier Rynne said...

Excellent point, Father Paul. I had forgotten about the 1968 Credo and just looked at it again. It is superb and yes it equates the Church with the Mystical Body of Christ. No confusing "subsistit" stuff. It's superior in clarity to the Dominus Iesus document I think.

"We believe in one, holy, catholic, and apostolic Church built by Jesus Christ on that rock which is Peter. She is the Mystical Body of Christ; at the same time a visible society instituted with hierarchical organs, and a spiritual community; the Church on earth, the pilgrim People of God here below, and the Church filled with heavenly blessings; the germ and the first fruits of the Kingdom of God, through which the work and the sufferings of Redemption are continued throughout human history, and which looks for its perfect accomplishment beyond time in glory.

I am not Spartacus said...

Dear Jasoncpetty. What to you is laughable is to others a palpable dread.

I remember exactly where I was - on the fifth hole of the Everglades Golf Course driving a golf cart towards the green - and I remember cheering LOUDLY -"YES YES YES" - when my Radio Ear Piece relayed to me news of the result of the conclave.

I was so possessed of a surety that he was the man to correct the heterodox actions of his predecessor that I look back at that time with little wonder because I am so frequently wrong; and, maybe, I am wrong to have let my unease concretise into dread but I can find no reason to pitch my spiritual tent any place other than in the land of temporal dread; although I maingtain total and complete confidence in Jesus and His Catholic Church.

http://www.waragainstbeing.com/parti-article4

There are far too many theological positions he has taken to explain them away or dismiss them.

At best, I have as my Holy Father, a man whom I can not figure out what he truly believes and I am reduced to relying heavily on my friend Dom Prosper Gueranger and the Early Church Fathers because the more I read from my Holy Father the less certain I am that he believes what the Catholic Church has believed for all time.

I can not put into words how troubling it is for me to publicly admit this but for a long long long time I have known that the Catholic Church I was born into in 1948 is not the Catholic Church of today - except in its remnant in the Traditional Orders with its Immemorial Mass - and that I dread that what I was learnt about The Faith is different than what My Holy Father believes about the Faith of all time.

I do not know if the good folks at Rorate will print this but it was necessary for me to confess it publicly.

Mike B. said...

"It would be appropriate for each particular Church to review the reception of Vatican Council II and the Catechism of the Catholic Church in its own life and mission, particularly in the realm of catechesis. This would provide the opportunity for a renewal of commitment on the part of the catechetical offices of the Dioceses which - supported by the Commissions for Catechesis of the Episcopal Conferences – have the duty to care for the theological formation of catechists."

Having noticed current emphasis on 'pastoral' training of catechists and priests, we need to welcome this concise and excellent Introduction for The Faith. It is obvious that the emphasis on the Catechism speaks to THE FAITH.
I for one will distribute copies of this Introduction [highlighting a few appropiate paragraphs], and spread to Parish catechists and priests.

By the way, the United States Catholic Catechism for Adults appears to be authentic to my reading. Perhaps some of the scholars out there disagree.

Michael F Brennan
St Petersburg Florida

Malta said...

Spartacus,

I agree with your assessment vis-a-vis BXVI, but, interestingly, Davies' was a friend, and revered him.

With Summorum Pontificum and the lifting of the excommunications we can at least say things have improved since Paul VI died (leaving a wasteland).

It takes a wide berth to turn a ship around.

But, again, I agree that BXVI is not nearly as conservative as some would brand him. That the Vineyard is so Devastated, with little remedy in sight, is an enigma known only to God.

Erasmus wrote that every evil is only allowed by God to engender a greater good.

So, and this is only my opinion, I think Modernism was festering for so long in the Church (since the eighteenth century, as least), that God allowed the Church to go to sh*t (He gave the Modernists what they wanted--with the Council and with the new mass) in order to preserve what is Right and Good and Beautiful. Ironic, yes, but think about it:

Instead of, say, meddling with the TLM (as Vatican II actually called for) it was preserved inviolate.

And by allowing Modernism run amuck, those with eyes to see are going to appreciate and love Traditionalism all the more.

In other words, by allowing things like Arianism and Modernism to control the Church for a time, God is eventually going to cull more souls to him.

It's a mystery, as is the mystery of iniquity.

Mike B. said...

Corrected attempt at clarity.

"It would be appropriate for each particular Church to review the reception of Vatican Council II and the Catechism of the Catholic Church in its own life and mission, particularly in the realm of catechesis. This would provide the opportunity for a renewal of commitment on the part of the catechetical offices of the Dioceses which - supported by the Commissions for Catechesis of the Episcopal Conferences – have the duty to care for the theological formation of catechists."

Having noticed current emphasis on 'pastoral' training of catechists and priests, we need to welcome this concise and excellent document titled Year of The Faith. It is obvious that the emphasis on the Catechism speaks to THE FAITH.
I for one will distribute copies of this document [highlighting a few appropiate paragraphs], and spread to Parish catechists, Parish groups, and priests. My diocese will ignore this if left to its own devices. Again, the connection to the Catechism is most necessary despite its critics.

By the way, the United States Catholic Catechism for Adults appears to be authentic to my reading. Perhaps some of the scholars out there disagree.

Michael F Brennan
St Petersburg Florida

Mike B. said...

AS THROUGH A DOOR

United States Catholic Catechism for Adults states:
[page 132, Part I: The Creed: The Faith Professed]
"OUTSIDE THE CHURCH THERE IS NO SALVATION"
From the Catechism, nos 846-847:"

"How are we to understand this affirmation, often repeated by the Church Fathers? Re-formulated positively, it means that all salvation comes from Christ the Head through the Church which is the Body: "Basing itself on Scripture and Tradition, the Council teaches that the Church, a pilgrim now on earth, is necessary for salvation: the one Christ is the mediator and the way of salvation; he is present to us in his body which is the Church. He himself explicitly asserted the necessity of faith and Baptism and thereby affirmed at the same time the necessity of the Church which men enter through Baptism as through a door. Hence they could not be saved who, knowing that the Catholic Church was founded as necessary by God through Christ, would refuse either to enter it or to remain in it.' (LG. NO. 14; CF. Mk 16:16; Jn3:5).
"This affirmation is not aimed at those who, through no fault of their own, do not know Christ and his Church:' "Those who, through no fault of their own, do not know the Gospel of Christ or his Church, but who nevertheless seek God with a sincere heart, and, moved by grace, try in their actions to do his will as they know it through the dictates of their conscience-those too may achieve eternal salvation" (LG, no. 16; cf, DS 3866-3872)"

The objective is Faith and Reason which avoids a Donatist illness.

Mike B. said...

AS THROUGH A DOOR
United States Catholic Catechism for Adults states:
[page 132, Part I: The Creed: The Faith Professed]
""OUTSIDE THE CHURCH THERE IS NO SALVATION"
From the Catechism, nos 846-847:"

"How are we to understand this affirmation, often repeated by the Church Fathers? Re-formulated positively, it means that all salvation comes from Christ the Head through the Church which is the Body: "Basing itself on Scripture and Tradition, the Council teaches that the Church, a pilgrim now on earth, is necessary for salvation: the one Christ is the mediator and the way of salvation; he is present to us in his body which is the Church. He himself explicitly asserted the necessity of faith and Baptism and thereby affirmed at the same time the necessity of the Church which men enter through Baptism as through a door. Hence they could not be saved who, knowing that the Catholic Church was founded as necessary by God through Christ, would refuse either to enter it or to remain in it.' (LG. NO. 14; CF. Mk 16:16; Jn3:5).
"This affirmation is not aimed at those who, through no fault of their own, do not know Christ and his Church:' "Those who, through no fault of their own, do not know the Gospel of Christ or his Church, but who nevertheless seek God with a sincere heart, and, moved by grace, try in their actions to do his will as they know it through the dictates of their conscience-those too may achieve eternal salvation" (LG, no. 16; cf, DS 3866-3872)""

The objective is Faith and Reason which avoids The Donatist illness, which absolutely knows the true meaning of scripture and dogma.

Michael F Brennan
St Petersburg, Florida

HSE said...

Year of THE Faith, indeed!

Knight of Malta said...

Mike B, we can quibble all day about EENS, but let's put things in perspective:

Christ came into this world for a reason, and died a very horrific death for a reason.

The Modernists would have us believe solely in the Jesus who culled the children to him (though He was that), and not the Jesus beaten and bleeding on the Cross (which the Modernists deny, since it smack of "Sacrifice", which seems arcane to them).

(Btw: Mass is NOT a meal, it's a Sacrifice!)

Why is the Missionary Spirit in the Church dead after Vatican II? This isn't a question asked just by me, so I will let the great theologian, Gherardini speak:

[After VII] "[A] missionary conception of the Church now freed from any form of or temptation to proselytism...this type of ecumenism, unfortunately, found a license to legitimacy from the spirit of assisi, thanks to the 'multi-religious' meeting celebrated there..."

Did Christ say to preach the Gospel to all nations, or create commissions for inter-religious dialogue and inter-religious prayer-meetings? Would Christ approve Assisi I and II, or throw the heretics out of the Basilica there as He did the Money Changers?

Knight of Malta said...

Btw: I need to expound:

I didn't mean to imply that heretics can come into Catholic worship space to explore our religion. My family who is Protestant does it all the time.

My point was this: Assisi I and II invited heretics to worship their heresy in Catholic space, and on Catholic Altars consecrated to Christ. That is the difference and it is probably the most sacrilegious thing in the Church's history. And it was presided by a "great".

What would Pope Saint Pius X (or any Saint) thought of Hindus and Buddhists invading a Basilica and filling the space with incense to their false gods?

Long-Skirts said...

Knight of Malta said:

"What would Pope Saint Pius X (or any Saint) thought of Hindus and Buddhists invading a Basilica"

MOTHER LIKES
BUDDHA BEST

Oh, to be Buddhist
Sought after most wooedist
By men who excuse
Much that’s lewd.

I’ve only a broodist
Ten souls who aren’t Buddhist
Once again booed, screwed
And tattooed!! ;-)

Guilt by association said...

Thank you for this posting, the discussion certainly makes it plainer to me that V2 can be understood in two ways (one heterodox and the other ambiguous Catholicism) and it is the novel way that is the predominant way of the post V2 church. How can the Pope fix this? I don't think he can on his current trajectory. God help us.

Name withheld to protect the guilty.

Mike B. said...

Knights of Malta,
..'(Btw: Mass is NOT a meal, it's a Sacrifice!)"

The recently corrected Mass translation has priest and faithful stating that this sacrifice be accepted. The 'spirit of vatican II' speaks to a meal, but not the still problematic Novus Ordo that I know of.

Mike B.

Anonymous said...

I'm so glad I don't have to try to determine what is true and what is the Truth from the comments here. I just have to adhere to the teachings of the Roman Catholic Church as pronounced by Christ's Vicar on earth, the Pope, and the Magisterium of the Church. The spotless Bride of Christ will always be preserved from error.

Ecclesia Militans said...

The Spotless Bride of Jesus Christ is the Church.
The Pope is not the Church, he is the helmsman, but any helmsman can steer off course. And if he chooses to listen to the voice of God calling, he can return to the course.

To say that all one needs to do is listen to the Pope, whatever he says or does, is to affirm that he can say and do no wrong. This would practically mean that he is a god, for absolute infallibility is the property only of God.

The Truth is that even a Pope can lead souls to perdition. If he strays from the Course and into certain death, because of his authority many will follow him.

To follow any mere man blindly is to condemn oneself.

"Put not your trust in princes, in the children of men, in whom there is no salvation."
(Ps 146:2-3)
"Thus saith the Lord: Cursed be the man that trusteth in man, and maketh flesh his arm, and whose heart departeth from the Lord." (Jer 17:5)

If any man, including the Pope, should stray from Holy Tradition, we are not to follow him. God never changes and His Tradition, His holy teachings never change. Any spirit of novelty here is not the spirit of God.

“If a future pope teaches anything contrary to the Catholic Faith, do not follow him.”
(Pope Pius IX, Letter to Bishop Brizen)

This is what Saint Catherine of Sienna, known for her devotion to the institution of the pope and her sentence that the pope is "sweet Christ on earth", said when a pope was going astray:

"Alas, Most Holy Father! At times obedience to you leads to eternal damnation."
(Letter to Pope Gregory IX, 1376)

New Catholic said...

Dear "Professor",

Schillebeeckx was a self-declared "Thomist", as well, so we remain unimpressed.

It seems you believe our point was theological. It was not. It naturally has theological implications, as everything involving the Church does, but it is a matter of linguistic clarity and semantics, only that, and in English only. "Modernism" was not even mentioned by ourselves. If there was a preferable translation, it should have been used - or is it not for this reason that your ilk has been hailing the new-new translation of the new-new-new-Missal?

NC